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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.38530] Need Area: Friends > General
"Trust is like virginity: Once you lose it, it’s gone for good." - Popular Truism

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[Quote No.38536] Need Area: Friends > General
"Never ascribe to malice what can be explained by incompetence." - Gonzalo Lira

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[Quote No.38541] Need Area: Friends > General
"Politics is show business for ugly people." - Paul Begala
(1961 - ), American Journalist
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[Quote No.38560] Need Area: Friends > General
"Make time for your relationships every day, no matter how busy you get." - Brian Tracy
Business advisor
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[Quote No.38569] Need Area: Friends > General
"In my youth I stressed freedom, and in my old age I stress order. I have made the great discovery that liberty is a product of order." - Will Durant
(1885 – 1981), a prolific American writer, historian, and philosopher.
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[Quote No.38584] Need Area: Friends > General
"A shoe that fits one person pinches another; there is no recipe for living that suits all cases. [One size does not fit all and therefore the need for the maximum of individual freedom, to create a life that suits you without hurting others.]" - Carl Gustav Jung

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[Quote No.38586] Need Area: Friends > General
"Charity is no part of the legislative duty of the government." - James Madison

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[Quote No.38588] Need Area: Friends > General
"One thing you can count on is that the government never controls itself. What it does is control its subjects." - Doug Casey

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[Quote No.38590] Need Area: Friends > General
"The government is good at one thing. It knows how to break your legs, and then hand you a crutch and say, 'See if it weren't for the government, you wouldn't be able to walk!' " - Harry Browne

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[Quote No.38592] Need Area: Friends > General
"After all there is but one race - humanity." - George Moore

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[Quote No.38596] Need Area: Friends > General
"Crime generally punishes itself." - Oliver Goldsmith

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[Quote No.38603] Need Area: Friends > General
"History does not long entrust the care of freedom to the weak or the timid." - Dwight D. Eisenhower

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[Quote No.38605] Need Area: Friends > General
"Judge not according to appearance, but judge righteous judgment." - Bible

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[Quote No.38626] Need Area: Friends > General
"Wisdom and goodness are twin-born, one heart must hold both sisters, never seen apart." - William Dean Howells
(1837 - 1920)
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[Quote No.38639] Need Area: Friends > General
"Do unto others 20% better than you would expect them to do unto you, to correct for subjective error." - Linus Pauling
(1901 - 1994), American chemistry professor. He won the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1954 and the Nobel Peace Prize in 1962, one of only four persons to win two Nobel prizes, one of only two to win in two disciplines, and the only person to win two un-shared prizes.
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[Quote No.38640] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Prejudice and discrimination hurt all involved as well as the society.] No matter how big a nation is, it is no stronger that its weakest people, and as long as you keep a person down, some part of you has to be down there to hold him down, so it means you cannot soar as you might otherwise." - Marian Anderson
(1897 - 1993), opera singer
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[Quote No.38641] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Prejudice and discrimination are not logical.] None of us is responsible for the complexion of his skin. This fact of nature offers no clue to the character or quality of the person underneath." - Marian Anderson
(1897 - 1993), opera singer
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[Quote No.38642] Need Area: Friends > General
"The minute a person whose word means a great deal to others dares to [set a good example and] take the open-hearted and courageous way, many others follow." - Marian Anderson
(1897 - 1993), opera singer
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[Quote No.38645] Need Area: Friends > General
"The highest morality may prove also to be the highest wisdom when the half-told story comes to be finished." - Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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[Quote No.38649] Need Area: Friends > General
"We forfeit three-fourths of ourselves in order to be like other people." - Arthur Schopenhauer
(1788 - 1860), philosopher
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[Quote No.38659] Need Area: Friends > General
"What light is to the eyes, what air is to the lungs, what love is to the heart; liberty is to the soul of man." - Robert Green Ingersoll

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[Quote No.38661] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Martial Arts and Self-Defence:] I believe in adequate defense at the coastline and nothing else. If a nation comes over here to fight, then we'll fight. The trouble with America is that when the dollar only earns 6 percent over here, then it gets restless and goes overseas to get 100 percent. Then the flag follows the dollar and the soldiers follow the flag." - Smedley Butler
Major General USMC
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[Quote No.38662] Need Area: Friends > General
"An empire founded by war has to maintain itself by war." - Montesquieu

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[Quote No.38688] Need Area: Friends > General
"As far as we can discern, the sole purpose of human existence is to kindle a light [of hope for happiness and beauty through personal contribution and example] in the darkness of mere being." - Carl Jung
Famous psychiatrist
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[Quote No.38716] Need Area: Friends > General
"All government without the consent of the governed is the very definition of slavery." - Jonathan Swift

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[Quote No.38717] Need Area: Friends > General
"It may be true that you can't fool all the people all the time, but you can fool enough of them to rule a large country." - Will Durant
Famous historian
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[Quote No.38723] Need Area: Friends > General
"The more corrupt the state, the more it legislates." - Tacitus

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[Quote No.38727] Need Area: Friends > General
"We are fast approaching the stage of the ultimate inversion: the stage where the government is free to do anything it pleases, while the citizens may act only by permission; which is the stage of the darkest periods of human history, the stage of rule by brute force." - Ayn Rand
Russian-born author and philosopher
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[Quote No.38728] Need Area: Friends > General
"For every government law hurriedly passed in response to a current or recent crisis, there will be two or more unintended consequences, which will have equal or greater negative effects then the problem it was designed to fix. A corollary is that unelected institutions are at least as bad and possibly worse than elected governments. A further corollary is that laws passed to appease a particular group, whether voters or a particular industry, will have at least three unintended consequences, most of which will eventually have the opposite effect than the intended outcomes and transfer costs to innocent bystanders." - John Mauldin
Financial commentator. [http://www.johnmauldin.com/frontlinethoughts/unintended-consequences1/ ]
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[Quote No.38738] Need Area: Friends > General
"A human being is a deciding being." - Viktor E. Frankl

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[Quote No.38760] Need Area: Friends > General
"Find out just what people will submit to, and you have found out the exact amount of injustice and wrong which will be imposed upon them; ... The limits of tyrants are prescribed by the endurance of those whom they oppress." - Frederick Douglass

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[Quote No.38794] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Contrary to common opinion, the economic philosophies behind different political parties' policies and therefore likely future choices in government differ. These differences can have dramatic long-term effects so it behooves voters to educate themselves on political parties economic philosophies lest they choose 'a path that leads to a destination' that they would never have chosen had they known more. This historical article at least starts that process of self-education. What each person decides in a free democracy is their personal choice along with the personal consequences but to make a democracy really work the choice needs to be informed. That is the individual's responsibility to themselves, their loved ones and fellow citizens and the state. It is the burden of a well-functioning democracy and therefore should be gratefully accepted to enjoy the benefits of this form of government.] 'The Vampire Economy: Italy, Germany, and the US' - What is the link between fascism and socialism? -- They are stages on a continuum of economic control, one that begins in intervention in the free market, moves toward regimentation and greater rigidity, marches toward socialism [communism, statism] as failures increase, and ends in dictatorship. The fascist system, wrote Mises, 'clung first to the same principles of economic policies which all not outright socialist governments have adopted in our day, interventionism [in the capitalist free market]. Then later it turned step by step toward the German system of socialism, i.e., all-round state control of economic activities.'[1] What distinguished the fascist variety of interventionism was its reliance on the idea of stability to justify extending state power. Big business and labor eagerly allied with the state [in a form of 'crony capitalism'] to obtain stability against what Murray Rothbard called business fluctuations, the ups and downs of particular markets that result from shifting consumer demands. They naïvely thought that state power could supplant consumer sovereignty with their own producer sovereignty over their industries while maintaining the greater productivity of the division of labor. At first, the fascists used state spending, mainly for war, to eliminate business fluctuations. Only after they became dependent on the state did the leaders of big business and labor realize that they had merely traded consumer sovereignty for state sovereignty. Soon after they learned which one was the more exacting taskmaster. To extend their control, the fascists bolstered fiscal expenditures with debt and monetary inflation. Not only did they hope thereby to dominate more and more industries with their expenditures, but also to boost public support for their regimes by generating economic prosperity. Instead, their reckless spending and inflating set in motion the boom-bust cycle. They took the depression as an opportunity to extend their power further by socializing investment with regulations while claiming that such measures would stabilize the business cycle. The fascists found a readymade theoretical justification for stabilization policies in the work of John Maynard Keynes.[2] Keynes claimed that the instability of capitalism emanated from the free play the system gave to the 'animal spirits' of investors. Driven by bouts of over-optimism and over-pessimism, investors alternate between bullish spending and bearish hoarding sending the economy into fits of boom and bust. Keynes proposed to eliminate this instability with state control over both sides of the capital markets. A central bank with the power to inflate the money supply through credit expansion would determine the supply of capital funding and fiscal and regulatory policy would socialize the investment of capital. In an open letter to President Roosevelt published in the New York Times on December 31, 1933, Keynes counseled this plan: 'In a field of domestic policy, I put in the forefront, a large volume of loan expenditure under government auspices. I put in the second place the maintenance of cheap and abundant credit. . . . With these . . . I should expect a successful outcome with great confidence. How much that would mean, not only to the material prosperity of the United States and the whole world, but in comfort to men's minds through a restoration of their faith in the wisdom and the power of government.'[3] Keynes was even more enthusiastic for the spread of his faith in Germany. In the preface to the German edition of the General Theory, published in 1936, Keynes wrote: 'The theory of aggregate production, which is the point of the following book, nevertheless can be much easier adapted to the conditions of a totalitarian state than the theory of production and distribution of a given production put forth under conditions of free competition and a large degree of laissez-faire.'[4] State control of money, credit, banking, and investment became the blueprint for fascist stabilization policy. Thus, the expansion of state control under fascism followed a predictable pattern. Debt and monetary inflation paid for state spending. The resulting expansion of credit led to the boom-bust cycle. The financial collapse of the bust resulted in stricter regulation of banking and socialization of investment, which permitted more monetary inflation, credit expansion, debt and spending. The consequent decline in the purchasing power of money justified price and wage controls, which became the focal point of all-around state control. In some cases more slowly and in other cases more rapidly, fascism followed this path toward central planning. Italian Fascism - The Italian Fascists began spending and inflating to co-opt big business soon after the March on Rome in 1922. Industrial profits and production jumped during the consequent boom which lasted until 1926. Protectionist measures were also enacted during the boom to give an added benefit to steel, iron, automobiles, and shipbuilding. Under pressure on the lire to devalue in 1926, the Bank of Italy reversed course and the boom collapsed. By 1927, prices and wages were falling but not sufficiently to prevent widespread bankruptcy and depression. Businesses failed by the thousands in the 1930s. From 1928–1932 production was cut by one-fourth and national income by one-third, and by the end of 1934 one-third of capital capacity sat idle and over one million workers were unemployed. The state progressively intervened to stave off the ill effects of its monetary inflation and extend its control. It bailed out big businesses and banks, fostered mergers and acquisitions, cartelized the remaining, now larger enterprises, and renewed spending, mainly for war. Annual state expenditures in the early 1930s were double their levels of the early years of Fascism. As tax revenues failed to keep pace, deficits ballooned. Banks also combined and associated more closely with big industrial concerns under the supervision of the state. To rescue the big banks, which had accumulated significant holdings of industrial securities during the boom, the state nationalized their holdings in 1931 and issued new securities, backed by the state, to provide a source of new credit for the banks. The state also created new and invigorated old credit institutions outside the banking system to provide added channels for credit. It appointed a majority of the boards of these new credit institutions and provided them with their funds by direct subsidies and by guaranteeing their industrial investments with state bonds. Private parties would invest in the state-guaranteed bonds of these new institutions that would then invest the funds in favored businesses. Although the domestic purchasing power of the lire was rising in the early 1930s, the Italian state still overvalued it in foreign exchange. The resulting trade deficit and gold outflows led the state to limit imports and impose foreign exchange controls. When even the highest tariff rates in the world failed to close the trade deficit the Fascists adopted an import quota system enforced by licensing importers. The burgeoning state control of business swelled the state bureaucracy and led to widespread centralization and corruption. Small businesses were left to fail and have their assets swallowed up by big businesses and big banks. Nearly 100,000 businesses failed from 1926–1935 in Italy, almost fourfold the number that failed in the previous ten years. By 1935, Mussolini boasted that fully three-fourths of Italian businesses rested on the shoulders of the state.[5] The Ethiopian war in 1935 demonstrated the extent of Fascist control.[6] Annual war expenditures were fourteen times larger during the war years than previously. To meet these extraordinary expenditures, the Fascists resorted to monetary inflation and capital confiscation. Beginning in July, the gold reserve against the Bank of Italy's notes was progressively relaxed. Even as the gold reserve sagged, from 5.25 billion lire in June of 1935 to 3.93 billion lire in October, the money stock rose to 15.27 billion lire. In the next few years, monetary inflation accelerated as the Fascists monetized the national debt which stood at 1.8 trillion lire by 1938. To curb the decline in the purchasing power of the lire, the Fascists resorted to price and wage controls which paved the way for all-around planning. Confiscation of capital began in May of 1935, when banks, businesses, and individuals were required to turn all their foreign issued stocks and bonds over to the Bank of Italy. By September, the state had compelled renters in cities and towns over a certain size to buy state bonds in amounts proportionate to their rents, all Italians to exchange their foreign credits for state bonds, businesses to invest all profits in excess of 6% in state securities, and investors holding heavily depreciated state bonds to exchange them plus liquid capital for a new issue of bonds at par value. Carl Schmidt, in 1939, summarized Italian Fascism with these words: 'Fascism rose to power as a preventive reaction, defending the pecuniary and sentimental interests of the propertied and quasi-propertied groups of towns and country from the spectre [sic] of revolution. . . . It not only sought to safeguard existing property rights, but also fostered further industrialization and concentration of business enterprise. . . Yet, Fascism could not solve the basic difficulties of Italian capitalism. The deepening economic crisis in later years forced business enterprise to rest more and more on the support of the State. As the economic role of the State grew, a subtle shift of spirit and purposes took place. Governmental support of the going economic order called for an increasing army of intruding officials, for a bureaucratic formalization of business affairs. And the bureaucracy developed ends of its own, associated with holding and enlarging its security and power. . . . Thus, despite all formal pronouncements . . . Fascism seemed to be evolving into a tyranny over all but a very few of the Italian people.'[7] The Original Vampire Economy - Fascist Italy defined the fascist style of interventionism: state control of the economy by fiscal and monetary policy and regulation. Nazi Germany, in contrast, illustrates not so much the fascist style, but how the fascist episode culminates in all-around state control of the economy. Concerning the socialization of investment under Nazi Germany, Günter Reimann wrote in 1939: 'Backed by the General Staff of the army, Nazi bureaucrats have been able to embark upon schemes which compel the most powerful leaders of business and finance to undertake projects which they consider both risky and unprofitable. The building-up of the German war economy takes precedence over everything, including the opinions of private capitalists and their scientific research staffs. . . . The viewpoint of private investors and industrialists who think of the ultimate safety and soundness of investments has been disregarded. This is particularly true of the big industrialists who earned huge profits from the armament boom and who have large amounts of capital to invest. Their liquid funds do not escape the attention of State commissars, who are searching for means to finance new State-sponsored plants.'[8] Lured by enormous profits in war production, big businessmen in one industry after another came under state control. Neither political connections nor social status protected industrialists from state predation. The Nazis coerced them into investing war profits to build factories for unprofitable projects such as synthetic rubber, low grade iron ore, and other ersatz production. State and Army commissars insisted on rapid expansion of plant capacity, ancillary investments related to war production, and the use of obsolete, discarded machinery.[9] Along with directing investment at the point of bayonet, the Nazis confiscated the profits of industrialists and directed them to new construction. In addition to malinvesting capital, these policies retarded maintenance of existing capital capacity. The state even forbade private investment to increase or replace existing profitable capital capacity. Prohibitions against new entry were enacted as well as closing down existing plants. And in the shrinking realm of private investment, the capriciousness of state bureaucrats could throw investment plans into disarray. The myopia of state planners led to the neglect of investment to maintain and improve what would become important wartime industries like the railroads.[10] Reimann summarizes the situation with these words: 'The flow of capital is no longer regulated by a capital market which directs it into industries that are particularly profitable. The State has supplanted the capital market. It compels private capitalists to make investments in a future wartime economy and creates economic conditions which cause old investments to decline in value.'[11] Faced with the dearth of profitable opportunities in the shrinking market economy, investors turned to what they thought would be safe-havens from state power such as real estate and precious metals and gems. Thus, even the capital not consumed by the state was directed away from the capital structure.[12] As part of the drive to bring capital markets under their control, the Nazis made bankers mere functionaries. Like their counterparts in industry, big bankers eagerly entangled themselves in the web of state power by accepting bailouts to avoid bankruptcy during the banking crisis in 1931. By the time the Nazis came to power, the state owned a majority of the shares of the big banks. In 1933 the state declared its 'control of all credit institutions' and began to license banks, collect information on debtors, and scrutinize banking operations. The state dictated to them what investments they were permitted to recommend to investors, namely government bonds and bonds of the enterprises subsidized by the state. Bankers were forbidden to express less than optimistic assessments of the state's financial condition. For investors who refused such advice and withdrew their capital from banks to invest on their own initiative, bankers were obligated to report their activity to the state. A large bureaucracy was formed to oversee banking, centered in the Reichsbank. By 1935, state spending had ballooned to the point that private investment decisions had been supplanted and banking was under the full sway of the state.[13] State power was extended to the entire economy in the form of price and wage controls. Wage controls were imposed in 1933 with the purpose of holding down labor costs to boost profits during the depression and comprehensive price controls were added in 1936 to hide the effects of monetary inflation. Hans Sennholz reports that by 1945, the Reichsbank's note issue was sixteen times larger than it was in 1933. And bank credit increased nearly sevenfold from July of 1936 to September 1944. By 1939 state debt had risen to 16 billion marks and the deficit had come to exceed the entire funds available in the capital markets. By 1935, war expenditures were more than half the total budget and by 1939 they exceeded 75% of the total. The price and wage controls enacted in response to the decline in the purchasing power of the mark formed an integral part of the Nazi system of total command over the economy.[14] When debt and monetary inflation proved insufficient to feed its spending, the state freed itself from financial limitations by decree. It refused to make payment on its debt [i.e. sovereign debt default], confiscated funds from individuals and groups, cancelled private debts and reduced interest rates on private loans and transferred the resulting funds to the state. As financial pressures from war expenditures mounted during 1938 and investors fled from banks to invest with other financial intermediaries, the state compelled all credit intermediaries, banks, insurance companies, and savings banks as well as municipalities to buy its debt. The stock market, too, was controlled by the state through the dominant position that banks came to hold in it after its collapse during the depression. Reimann estimated that by 1938, 80–90% of new capital was absorbed by the state. Thus, the Nazis built their war economy by consuming the capital stock constructed by preceding generations of German savers and investors.[15] The New Vampire Economy - The fascist form of interventionism in America was built on the rump of state corporatism that emerged during the Progressive Era and the experience of state planning during the First World War.[16] The former culminated in the establishment of the Federal Reserve System to fully centralize state control of banks and monetary inflation and the latter set precedents for New Deal programs. With the Fed in full swing, the Italian pattern during the Great Depression was seen in America, also.[17] Monetary inflation and credit expansion during the 1920s led to the bust which was used to justify greater state control of investment, through fiscal expenditures and regulation. Like Mussolini, Hoover used protectionism to favor certain producers, increased funding for public works programs, and bailed out key businesses. Federal spending more than doubled from 1929 through 1934 and nearly tripled for the decade between 1929 and 1939. From a modest surplus in 1930, the federal budget was in deficit in every one of the next fifteen years. In 1932 the deficit was 142% of tax revenue and in 1933 it was 130%. In four of the five years between 1932 and 1936, the budget deficit was more than 100% of tax revenues.[18] After the stock market crash in October 1929, the Fed[eral Reserve Bank] tried unsuccessfully to re-inflate and to bolster the credit markets. When its effort failed, Hoover strong-armed big banks into establishing the National Credit Corporation to bailout banks. Capitalized with $500 million from the banks and the power to borrow up to $1 billion with Fed assistance, the NCC operated as a stopgap measure until the rebirth of the War Finance Corporation from the First World War as the Reconstruction Finance Corporation. Born in January of 1932, the RFC was chartered to issue $1.5 billion in debt and to lend to distressed businesses. The first $1 billion was dispensed by June and 80% of it went to banks and railroads. In July the RFC was authorized by the Emergency Relief and Construction Act to extend its credit to $3.8 billion and it dispensed $2.3 billion for the year, $300 million of which was lent to the states for their relief programs. Hoover also induced insurance companies to put off foreclosing mortgages by subsidizing them through the Federal Farm Loan Banks. Authorized by the first Glass-Steagall Act in February of 1932, the Fed stepped up its purchases of Treasury securities in what proved to be another vain attempt to re-inflate the economy. Despite a 35% rise in bank reserves during 1932, the money stock fell by $3.5 billion. In July of 1932, Hoover added the Federal Home Loan Bank with $125 million of capital for mortgage loans.[19] At least Hoover did not embrace the Swope Plan, which called for the forced cartelization of the economy under the direction of the federal government; that would have to wait for his successor.[20] While accelerating expansionary fiscal and monetary policy, Roosevelt conducted a regulatory blitz. The Emergency Banking Act of 1933 further cartelized banks, brought them under stricter federal regulation, and provided bailouts. The state eliminated competition among banks and from non-bank institutions by reserving to banks a uniform set of practices. The Banking Act of 1935 insulated the banking cartel by closing entry to unapproved competitors. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation slowed the liquidation process of the depression and froze malinvestments in banking and the capital structure. To pave the way for more monetary inflation, Roosevelt abandoned the gold standard, abrogated gold contracts, and confiscated gold holdings. The Civilian Conservation Corps, the Emergency Relief Act, and the Works Progress Administration subsidized unemployment and misallocation of labor and distorted private charitable efforts. The Agricultural Adjustment Acts put crop planting decisions in the hands of the state and subsidized disinvestment and malinvestment in agricultural production. The Tennessee Valley Authority malinvested capital, destroyed natural resources, and distorted energy markets. The Federal Securities Act put stock markets, the pinnacle of capital allocation in the market, under the regulatory arm of the federal government. The National Industrial Recovery Act cartelized and bureaucratized the economy under federal control. The Home Owners Loan Act, the National Housing Act, and the Rural Electrification Administration malinvested capital in housing and electricity. The National Labor Relations Act and the Fair Labor Standards Act distorted labor costs leading to malinvestments and fostered unemployment. The Social Security Act forced people to 'invest' in federal trust-fund bonds. As the Fascists had done, Roosevelt built public support for state intervention as necessary for stability and made war preparation the main outlet for the state's stabilizing expenditures. While New Deal agencies owed much to First World War predecessors both in form and in personnel it took the Second World War to bring all-around state planning.[21] The Selective Training and Service Act of 1940 empowered Roosevelt to conscript labor and confiscate goods and factors for the war effort. In mid-1940, the Reconstruction Finance Corporation was authorized to issue debt and use it to purchase and operate production facilities, invest in equipment and machinery, and buy land for war production. The First and Second War Powers Acts in 1941 vested broad powers in the President to seize production facilities, regulate industries, purchase goods and factors, stipulate terms of contracts, allocate resources and expanded Fed inflationary potential by authorizing it to purchase debt directly from the Treasury. The Office of Price Administration was charged with setting price and wage controls in the wake of the Fed's massive monetary inflation. Its General Maximum Price Regulation, issued in April of 1942, resulted in widespread shortages and rationing. Not content with the unsystematic application of controls, Roosevelt pushed through the economic Stabilization Act in October of 1942. The Office of Economic Stabilization was charged to develop a 'comprehensive national economic policy relating to control of civilian purchasing power, prices, rents, wages, profits, rationing, subsidies, and all related matters.' From 1940 to 1945 federal expenditures increased nearly tenfold and tax revenue rose nearly sevenfold. By 1942, the budget deficit was more than double all federal expenditures in 1940. In 1943, the deficit was two and a half times the deficit in 1942 and double the amount of 1943 tax revenues. The federal debt rose fivefold during the war and the Fed nearly doubled the money stock.[22] State power was rolled back after the war, federal expenditures were cut in half and many of the agencies were disbanded and some of their functions ceased while others were transferred to remaining agencies, but the state assumed the role of stabilizing the economy. The Employment Act of 1946 pledged the federal government to 'use all practicable means . . . to promote maximum employment, production, and purchasing power' in other words, to prevent downturns.[23] To stabilize the economy, the state has been working to restore the power it exercised during the war. Let's recount how far down the fascist path we have traveled. The Fascists used state spending and regulation to direct investment into state-approved lines of production, war being chief among them. The federal government has 165 primary agencies, 141 of which have a significant affect on investment in the economy. Sixty-six impact investment by fiscal expenditures. The departments of agriculture, commerce, defense, education, energy, health and human services, homeland security, housing and urban development, transportation, and interior are among the major sources of such federal control. In 2005, the federal government spent approximately $1.3 trillion in these areas. And from 1945 to 2005, the federal government has spent $9.5 trillion on defense, $6.5 trillion on health care, $1.4 trillion on education, $1.2 trillion on transportation, $0.8 trillion on energy and natural resources, $0.6 trillion on agriculture, $0.5 trillion on science, space, and technology, $0.33 trillion on community and regional development, and $0.3 trillion on commerce and housing.[24] These expenditures have malinvested entire sections of the capital structure. The other 75 federal agencies that affect investment do so by regulation. Examples here include the departments of labor, justice, and treasury, the environmental protection agency, the federal trade commission, the federal communication commission, the federal deposit insurance corporation, and the federal reserve system. The cost of compliance with federal regulation has been estimated at $1 trillion a year without the Patriot Act and Sarbanes-Oxley.[25] The impact of the federal government's fiscal and regulatory policies is $2.3 trillion this year [2005]. This is nearly 20% of Gross Domestic Product and over 40% of Private Product Remaining. The Fascists used a central bank and cartelized the banking system under its regulation for the purpose of monetizing their debt and expanding the supply of credit. The Fed owns $736 billion of the federal debt and depository institutions own another $1.4 trillion. Together they hold 27% of the $7.9 trillion federal debt. Of the $4.6 trillion of the federal debt owned by the public, depository institutions hold 30%. The fiduciary component of checkable deposits issued by depository institutions is approximately $582 billion, which is 8% of the total credit of $7 trillion intermediated by depository institutions.[26] As Joe Salerno has pointed out, monetary inflation and credit expansion cloak the capital consumption of state intervention and thus quell public outcry against it.[27] The Fascists closed the windows of opportunity for investors to escape state control. As restrictions on banking mounted in the 1960s and 1970s, investors sought alternatives and entrepreneurs provided them. From 1950 to 1980, the share of total assets of all financial intermediaries held by banks fell from 52% to 36%. And the share of the short term credit market held by banks fell from 91% to 71%.[28] In response to the financial services revolution, the federal government moved to consolidate its control over financial intermediaries. The Monetary Control Act of 1980 brought all financial institutions that offer checkable deposits under the regulatory authority of the Fed and imposed on them the uniform practices of all member banks. All depository institutions in America are regulated by three federal agencies, the Fed, the FDIC, and the Comptroller of the Currency. Combined they enforce more than 150 categories of regulations. The Fascists used banks to collect information on clients' financial activity. Since the Bank Secrecy Act of 1970, the federal government has enacted eight additional anti-money laundering laws expanding its power to collect financial information on Americans. Banks must now form financial profiles of their customers and file suspicious activities reports to the state when they deviate from these patterns. The Fascists dictated acceptable lines of investment. The federal government compels banks to make certain types of loans, as with the Community Reinvestment Act [later considered to have partly contributed to a US housing bubble that burst in 2006-11 causing the second greatest global financial crisis since the Great Depression. In the US it was called The Great Recession and elsewhere The Global Financial Crisis], and businesses to make certain types of investments, as with the Americans with Disabilities Act, environmental laws, and Sarbanes-Oxley. In other cases, the federal government coercively changes incentives banks have to lend into certain lines of production, as with the Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The Fascists confiscated capital when fiscal pressures mounted. The confiscatory power of the federal government has been directed at drug war and RICO cases. The Patriot Act increased asset confiscation to abate money laundering and made anti-money laundering measures uniform across financial institutions. Faced with a fiscal crisis and price inflation from their fiscal and monetary policies, the Fascists stepped up dictatorial and confiscatory powers and resorted to price and wage controls. Extraordinary federal expenditures for the Vietnam War and Great Society programs coupled with monetary inflation led to our last imposition of price and wage controls in the early 1970s. Certainly, the federal government will resort to greater dictatorial and confiscatory powers and stricter price and wage controls in the wake of the next fiscal and monetary crisis. [This was prophetic. This article was published in 2005, only two years before the second greatest global financial catastrophe in history.] A political class that is willing to throw $250 billion into rebuilding a single city in the face of massive federal deficits is oblivious to the looming fiscal danger. As always, however, war spending [Iraq War from March 20, 2003 to December 18, 2011; Afghanistan War began October 7, 2001 and is still going in 2012] is the biggest threat to the fiscal integrity of the state. If these fascist trends in America are not checked, they will lead to net capital consumption and the end of economic progress in America not to mention curtailing what remains of our liberties. [1]Ludwig von Mises, 'Human Action', Scholar's Edition (Auburn, Ala.: Mises Institute, 1998), p. 814. [2]John Maynard Keynes, 'The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money' (1936); On Keynes's thought, see Joseph T. Salerno, 'The Development of Keynes's Economics From Marshall to Millennialism,' Review of Austrian Economics, Vol. 6, No. 1 (1992), pp. 3–64. [3]John Maynard Keynes, 'An Open Letter to President Roosevelt,' New York Times, December 31, 1933 in ed. Herman Krooss, Documentary History of Banking and Currency in the United States, Vol. 4 (New York: McGraw Hill, 1969), p. 2788. [4]John Maynard Keynes, 'Forward', 1936 German Edition of 'The General Theory of Employment, Interest, and Money', translated and reprinted in James J. Martin, Revisionist Viewpoints (Colorado Springs: Ralph Myles, 1971), pp. 203–05. [5]Carl Schmidt, 'The Corporate State in Action' (London: Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1939), pp. 153–76. [6]Gaetano Salvemini, 'Italian Fascism' (London: Victor Gollancz Ltd., 1938), pp. 46–56. [7]Schmidt, 'Corporate State', pp. 152–53. [8]Günter Reimann, 'The Vampire Economy: Doing Business under Fascism' (New York: The Vanguard Press, 1939), p. 125. Reimann, who real name was Hans Steinicke, passed away on March 8 of this year at the age of 100. After the war, he founded and operated the prestigious newsletter, 'International Reports on Finance and Currency'. [9]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', pp. 125–36. [10]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', pp. 137–53. [11]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', p. 148. [12]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', p. 153. [13]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', pp. 154–61 [14]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', pp. 170-173; Hans Sennholz, 'Age of Inflation' (Belmont, Mass.: Western Islands, 1979), pp. 88–108. [15]Reimann, 'Vampire Economy', pp. 164–67. [16]On the Progressive Era, see Gabriel Kolko, 'The Triumph of Conservatism' (New York: Free Press, 1963). On the First World War, see Murray Rothbard, 'War Collectivism in World War I,' in Ronald Radosh and Murray Rothbard, eds., 'A New History of Leviathan' (New York: E.P. Dutton and Co., 1972), pp. 66–110. [17]On the Great Depression, see Murray Rothbard, 'America's Great Depression' (Kansas City: Sheed and Ward, 1963). [18]Budget of the United States Government at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html) [19]Rothbard, 'America's Great Depression', pp. 227–81. [20]On the New Deal, see Robert Higgs, 'Crisis and Leviathan' (New York: Oxford University Press, 1987), pp. 159-195. [21]On the war economy of the Second World War, see Higgs, 'Crisis and Leviathan', pp. 196–236. [22]Budget of the United States Government at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html) [23]Higgs, 'Crisis and Leviathan', p. 227. [24]Budget of the United States Government at http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html (http://www.gpoaccess.gov/usbudget/fy05/hist.html) [25]Government Regulatory Cost Compliance Report at http://mwhodges.home.att.net/regulation.htm (http://mwhodges.home.att.net/regulation.htm) [26]St. Louis Fed: Economic Data at http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/ (http://research.stlouisfed.org/fred2/) [27]Joseph Salerno, "From Kennedy's 'New Economics' to Nixon's 'New Economic Policy': Monetary Inflation and the March of Economic Fascism," in John Denson, ed., 'Reassessing the Presidency' (Auburn, Ala.: Mises Institute, 2001), pp. 594–96. [28]James Elliot Mason, 'The Transformation of Commercial Banking in the United States' (New York: Garland Publishing, 1997), p. 8." - Jeffrey M. Herbener
He teaches economics at Grove City College. He delivered this paper at the Mises Institute's 2005 Supporters Summit. Published in the Mises Daily, Thursday, October 13, 2005. [http://mises.org/daily/author/206/Jeffrey-M-Herbener ]
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[Quote No.38797] Need Area: Friends > General
"Only one [presidential] candidate, Ron Paul [the doctor turned Republican Congressman with Libertarian leanings], seems to have grasped the issues and offered the right remedies for the central problems we are facing. From my risk based standpoint, one candidate represents the right policies [regarding addressing deficits, the Federal Reserve, war and economic resilience by allowing Schumpeter's capitalistic creative destruction instead of 'crony capitalism' bailing-out the failured companies in the economy]..." - Nassim Taleb
The very highly regarded Lebanese-American thinker, former hedge fund manager and Wall Street trader, expert on problems of randomness, probability and risk-mamagement and author of best-sellers, 'Fooled By Randomness' and 'The Black Swan'. He is a professor at Polytechnic Institute of New York University and Oxford University. He has also been a practitioner of mathematical finance and is currently a scientific adviser at Universa Investments and the International Monetary Fund. Quote from CNBC interview March 14, 2012. [http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=B6s8a6H7Qts&feature=g-u-u&context=G285b2abFUAAAAAAAFAA ]
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[Quote No.38806] Need Area: Friends > General
"Think 'Win-Win'!!" - Stephen R. Covey

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[Quote No.38815] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is what we make of what we have, not what we are given, that separates one person from another." - Nelson Mandela

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[Quote No.38843] Need Area: Friends > General
"Blessed are those who can give without remembering and take without forgetting." - Princess Bibesco

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[Quote No.38861] Need Area: Friends > General
"The only people with whom you should try to get even are those who have helped you." - John E. Southard

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[Quote No.38934] Need Area: Friends > General
"We look forward to the time when the power to love will replace the love of power. Then will our world know the blessings of peace." - William Ellery Channing
(1780-1842), American moralist, Unitarian Clergyman and Author
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[Quote No.38935] Need Area: Friends > General
"No free government, or the blessings of liberty, can be preserved to any people but by a firm adherence to justice, moderation, temperance, frugality, and virtue; and by a frequent recurrence to fundamental principles." - Patrick Henry
(1736-1799), American Lawyer, patriot, and orator, symbol of the American struggle for liberty.
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[Quote No.38936] Need Area: Friends > General
"Those who expect to reap the blessings of liberty must undergo the fatigues of supporting it." - Thomas Paine
(1737-1809), English born American Writer and political pamphleteer, whose 'Common Sense' and 'Crisis' papers were important influences on the American Revolution.
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[Quote No.39056] Need Area: Friends > General
"There is no greater calling than to serve your fellow men [and women]. There is no greater contribution than to help the weak. There is no greater satisfaction than to have done it well. " - Walter Reuther

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[Quote No.39059] Need Area: Friends > General
"Three conditions are necessary for Penance: contrition, which is sorrow for sin, together with a purpose of amendment; confession of sins without any omission; and satisfaction by means of good works." - Thomas Aquinas

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[Quote No.39103] Need Area: Friends > General
"Peace is not the product of a victory or a command. It has no finishing line, no final deadline, no fixed definition of achievement. Peace is a never-ending process, the work of many decisions." - Oscar Hammerstein II

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[Quote No.39122] Need Area: Friends > General
"Our task must be to free ourselves from this prison by widening our circles of compassion to embrace all living creatures and the whole of nature in its beauty." - Albert Einstein

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[Quote No.39143] Need Area: Friends > General
"You cannot do wrong and feel right. It is impossible!" - Ezra Taft Benson

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[Quote No.39253] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is easy to hate and it is difficult to love. This is how the whole scheme of things works. All good things are difficult to achieve; and bad things are very easy to get." - Rene Descartes

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[Quote No.39277] Need Area: Friends > General
"[In dealing with others, it is important, if we are all to be happy, win-win, that we address all of our needs. To that end, here is a very useful breakdown of our hierarchical human needs according to the very highly regarded psychology researcher and theorist, Abraham Maslow. Keeping these in mind when dealing with others is very helpful:] Maslow's Holistic Dynamic Needs Hierarchy - [in order of the priority of those needs:] - P = Physiological, - S = Safety, - L = Belongingness and Love, - E = Esteem, - SA = Self-Actualization. [What do those mean, in more detail:] --- Physiological Needs - Food, water, oxygen, etc. Anything the physical organism needs to survive. Very fundamental life or death needs. Perhaps because Maslow was well fed, he didn't spend a lot of time on these. "...it seems impossible as well as useless to make any list of fundamental physiological needs, for they can come to almost any number one might wish, depending on the degree of specificity of description.". --- Safety Needs - "If the physiological needs are relatively well gratified, there then emerges a new set of needs, which we may categorize roughly as the safety needs, (security; stability; dependency; protection; freedom from fear, anxiety, and chaos; need for structure, order, law, and limits; strength in the protector; and so on)." --- Belongingness and Love Needs - "If both the physiological and the safety needs are fairly well gratified, there will emerge the love and affection and belongingness needs, and the whole cycle already described will repeat itself with this new center. The love needs involve giving and receiving affection. When they are unsatisfied, a person will feel keenly the absence of friends, mate, or children. Such a person will hunger for relations with people in general - for a place in the group or family - and will strive with great intensity to achieve this goal. Attaining such a place will matter more than anything else in the world and he or she may even forget that once, when hunger was foremost, love seemed unreal, unnecessary, and unimportant. Now the pangs of loneliness, ostracism, rejection, friendlessness, and rootlessness are preeminent." --- Esteem Needs - "All people in our society (with a few pathological exceptions) have a need or desire for a stable, firmly based, usually high evaluation of themselves, for self-respect or self-esteem, and for the esteem of others. These needs may therefore be classified into two subsidiary sets. These are, first, the desire for strength, achievement, adequacy, mastery and competence, confidence in the face of the world, and independence and freedom. Second, we have what we may call the desire for reputation or prestige (defining it as respect or esteem from other people), status, fame and glory, dominance, recognition, attention, importance, dignity, or appreciation." "Satisfaction of the self-esteem need leads to feelings of self-confidence, worth, strength, capability, and adequacy, of being useful and necessary in the world. But thwarting of these needs produces feelings of inferiority, of weakness, and of helplessness." "The most stable and therefore most healthy self-esteem is based on deserved respect from others rather than on external fame or celebrity and unwarranted adulation." --- Self-actualization Need - "Even if all these needs are satisfied, we may still often (if not always) expect that a new discontent and restlessness will soon develop, unless the individual is doing what he or she, individually, is fitted for. Musicians must make music, artists must paint, poets must write if they are to be ultimately at peace with themselves. What humans can be, they must be. They must be true to their own nature. This need we may call self-actualization." (...Maslow later redefined self-actualization as a function of frequency of peak experiences...In Toward a Psychology of Being (1968), Maslow redefined self-actualization as episodic... "In other words, any person in any of the peak experiences takes on temporarily many of the characteristics which I found in self-actualizing individuals. That is, for the time they become self-actualizers. We may think of it as a passing characterological change if we wish, and not just as an emotional-cognitive-expressive state. Not only are these his happiest and most thrilling moments, but they are also moments of greatest maturity, individuation, fulfilment - in a word, his healthiest moments. This makes it possible for us to redefine self-actualization in such a way as to purge it of its static and typological shortcomings, and to make it less a kind of all-or-none pantheon into which some rare people enter at the age of 60. We may define it as an episode, or a spurt in which the powers of the person come together in a particularly efficient and intensely enjoyable way, and in which he is more integrated and less split, more open for experience, more idiosyncratic, more perfectly expressive or spontaneous, or fully functioning, more creative, more humorous, more ego-transcending, more independent of his lower needs, etc. He becomes in these episodes more truly himself, more perfectly actualizing his potentialities, closer to the core of his Being, more fully human. Such states or episodes can, in theory, come at any time in life to any person. What seems to distinguish those individuals I have called self-actualizing people, is that in them these episodes seem to come far more frequently, and intensely and perfectly than in average people. This makes self-actualization a matter of degree and of frequency rather than an all-or-none affair, and thereby makes it more amenable to available research procedures. We need no longer be limited to searching for those rare subjects who may be said to be fulfilling themselves most of the time. In theory at least we may also search any life history for episodes of self-actualization, especially those of artists, intellectuals and other especially creative people, of profoundly religious people, and of people experiencing great insights in psychotherapy, or in other important growth experiences." (Note that when Maslow refers to "especially creative people", that he has a broad definition of creativity where creativity is a quality that can be applied to any task in life. Maslow maintained that a first rate soup is better than a second rate painting. While he seems here to be favouring artists, scholars and saints, I don't think it's his intention to exclude homemakers, carpenters, athletes, etc.)" - Abraham Maslow
(1908 – 1970), a highly respected American professor of psychology at Brandeis University, Brooklyn College, New School for Social Research and Columbia University, famous for creating 'Maslow's hierarchy of needs'. Please note that Abraham Maslow's quotes are found within the body of this excellent text, from the Personality and Consciousness website, which is included to give greater meaning to these important insights. [http://pandc.ca/?cat=abraham_maslow&page=needs_hierarchy ] and [http://pandc.ca/?cat=abraham_maslow&page=episodic_self_actualization ]
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[Quote No.39326] Need Area: Friends > General
"We shall never achieve harmony with land, any more than we shall achieve absolute justice or liberty for people. In these higher aspirations, the important thing is not to achieve but to strive." - Aldo Leopold

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[Quote No.39329] Need Area: Friends > General
"Let us in education [and life] dream of an aristocracy of achievement arising out of a democracy of opportunity [a true meritocracy]." - Thomas Jefferson

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[Quote No.39339] Need Area: Friends > General
"We cannot seek achievement for ourselves and forget about progress and prosperity for our community... Our ambitions must be broad enough to include the aspirations and needs of others, for their sakes and for our own!" - Cesar Chavez

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Imagi-Natives'
Self-Defence
& Fitness Training

because
Everyone deserves
to be
Healthy and Safe!
Ideal for Anyone's Personal Protection Needs
Simple, Fast, Effective!
Maximum Safety - Minimum Force
No Punches, Kicks, Chokes, Pressure Points or Weapons Used
Based on Shaolin Chin-Na Seize and Control Methods
Comprehensively Covers Over 130 Types of Attack
Lavishly Illustrated With Over 1300 illustrations
Accredited Training for Australian Security Qualifications
National Quality Council Approved