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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.42513] Need Area: Friends > General
"['Live and let live!' - Freedom from interference by force, coercion or fraud so long as not hurting another's physical person or property:] The Gadsden flag:- The Gadsden flag is a historical American flag with a yellow field depicting a rattlesnake coiled and ready to strike. Positioned below the snake are the words 'DONT TREAD ON ME'. The flag was designed by and is named after American general and statesman Christopher Gadsden. It was also used by the Continental Marines as an early motto flag. Along with the Moultrie Flag, it is iconic as a premier American flag; it was the first flag ever carried into battle by the United States Marine Corps, during the American Revolution. The timber rattlesnake and eastern diamondback rattlesnake both populate the geographical areas of the original thirteen colonies. Their use as a symbol of the American colonies can be traced back to the publications of Benjamin Franklin. In 1751, he made the first reference to the rattlesnake in a satirical commentary published in his Pennsylvania Gazette. It had been the policy of Britain to send convicted criminals to America, so Franklin suggested that they thank the British by sending rattlesnakes to England. Benjamin Franklin's 'Join, or Die' cartoon In 1754, during the French and Indian War, Franklin published his famous woodcut of a snake cut into eight sections. It represented the colonies, with New England joined together as the head and South Carolina as the tail, following their order along the coast. Under the snake was the message 'Join, or Die'. This was the first political cartoon published in an American newspaper. When American colonies came to identify more with their own community and liberty than as vassals of the British empire, icons that were unique to the Americas became increasingly popular. The rattlesnake, like the bald eagle and American Indian, came to symbolize American ideals and society. As the American Revolution grew, the snake began to see more use as a symbol of the colonies. In 1774, Paul Revere added it to the title of his paper, the Massachusetts Spy, as a snake joined to fight a British dragon. In December 1775, Benjamin Franklin published an essay in the Pennsylvania Journal under the pseudonym American Guesser in which he suggested that the rattlesnake was a good symbol for the American spirit: 'I recollected that her eye excelled in brightness, that of any other animal, and that she has no eye-lids —She may therefore be esteemed an emblem of vigilance. —She never begins an attack, nor, when once engaged, ever surrenders: She is therefore an emblem of magnanimity and true courage. —As if anxious to prevent all pretensions of quarreling with her, the weapons with which nature has furnished her, she conceals in the roof of her mouth, so that, to those who are unacquainted with her, she appears to be a most defenseless animal; and even when those weapons are shewn and extended for her defense, they appear weak and contemptible; but their wounds however small, are decisive and fatal:—Conscious of this, she never wounds till she has generously given notice, even to her enemy, and cautioned him against the danger of stepping on her. —Was I wrong, Sir, in thinking this a strong picture of the temper and conduct of America?'" - wikipedia.com
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gadsden_flag ]
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[Quote No.42515] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Freedom, diversity and individualism:] Let one thousand flowers bloom. [This is a quote often used to encourage many ideas from many sources. It is a common misquotation of (Chinese Communist leader) Chairman Mao Zedong's 'Let a hundred flowers blossom'. This slogan was used during the period of approximately six weeks in the summer of 1957 when the Chinese intelligentsia were invited to criticize the political system then obtaining in Communist China. The full quotation, taken from a speech of Mao's in Peking in February 1957, is: 'Letting a hundred flowers blossom and a hundred schools of thought contend is the policy for promoting progress in the arts and the sciences and a flourishing socialist culture in our land.' It is sometimes suggested that the initiative was a deliberate attempt to flush out dissidents by encouraging them to show themselves as critical of the regime. Whether or not it was a deliberate trap isn't clear but it is the case that many of those who put forward views that were unwelcome to Mao were executed.]" - Mao Zedong
[http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/226950.html ]
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[Quote No.42519] Need Area: Friends > General
"Women hold up half the sky." - Chairman Mao Zedong (also transliterated as Mao Tse-tung)
Chinese Communist leader
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[Quote No.42520] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Men and women should never forget that women are just as important as men in the world and have all the same unalienable human rights.] Women hold up half the sky." - Chairman Mao Zedong (also transliterated as Mao Tse-tung)
Chinese Communist leader
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[Quote No.42521] Need Area: Friends > General
"Politics is war without bloodshed, while war is politics with bloodshed." - Chairman Mao Zedong (also transliterated as Mao Tse-tung)
Chinese Communist leader
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[Quote No.42525] Need Area: Friends > General
"[War:] When the enemy advances, withdraw; when he stops, harass; when he tires, strike; when he retreats, pursue." - Mao Tse-Tung (also known as Mao Zedong)
(1893 - 1976), Chinese stateman, the key figure in China in the 20th century.
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[Quote No.42526] Need Area: Friends > General
"Political power [control] grows out of the barrel of a gun [force and coercion]." - Mao Tse-Tung (also known as Mao Zedong)
(1893 - 1976), Chinese Communist stateman, the key figure in China in the 20th century
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[Quote No.42530] Need Area: Friends > General
"Rights are moral (i.e., life-serving) principles specifying an individual’s proper freedom of action in a social context. The basic right, the right to life, is the right to act freely on the judgment of one’s mind; we need this freedom because using reason is our basic means of surviving, producing values, accomplishing goals, and achieving happiness. The right to liberty is the right to be free from physical force by other people; we need this freedom because physical force stops us from acting on our judgment—our basic means of living. The right to property is the right to keep, use, and dispose of the product of one’s effort; we need this freedom so that we can produce and trade according to our judgment—and reap the benefits thereof. The right to the pursuit of happiness is the right to seek the goals and values of one’s choice; we need this freedom because choosing and pursuing our own goals by means of our own judgment is what makes life worth living. And the right to free speech is the right to say or write or otherwise express what one thinks; we need this freedom because expressing our ideas and judging the ideas and actions of other people is part and parcel of using our minds." - Craig Biddle
editor of The Objective Standard (which advocates and applies Objectivism, the philosophy of Ayn Rand, to current cultural and political issues) and author of 'Loving Life: The Morality of Self-Interest and the Facts that Support It'. Quote from his essay, 'Religion vs. Free Speech', published in The Objective Standard, Summer, 2006, Vol.1, No.2 [http://www.theobjectivestandard.com/issues/2006-summer/religion-vs-free-speech.asp ]
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[Quote No.42532] Need Area: Friends > General
"'Equality: The Unknown Ideal'... [There are]...three distinct egalitarian ideals: a 'mainstream' ideal — equality before the law — and two more 'radical' ideals — socioeconomic equality...a socialist or Marxist ideal, and ...equality in authority...an individualist or libertarian [Lockean] ideal... The case against socioeconomically egalitarian legislation is, as I said, an egalitarian one; for such legislation invariably involves the coercive subordination or subjection of dissenting individuals to the taxes and regulations imposed by government decision makers, and thus presupposes an inequality in authority between the former and the latter. As Ludwig von Mises writes: 'It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. The funds that a government spends for whatever purposes are levied by taxation. And taxes are paid because the taxpayers are afraid of offering resistance to the tax gatherers. They know that any disobedience or resistance is hopeless. As long as this is the state of affairs, the government is able to collect the money that it wants to spend. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom.' Nor would an anarchistic version of socialism fare any better; as long as some people are imposing redistributive policies by force or threat of force on unconsenting others, we have inequality in authority between the coercers and the coerced, regardless of whether those doing the coercing are public citizens or private individuals, and regardless of whether they represent a majority or a minority. Nor would a Hobbesian jungle, where anyone is free to impose her will on anyone else, embody equality in authority; for as soon as one person does succeed in subordinating another, an inequality in authority emerges.’ Nor would an anarchistic version of socialism fare any better; as long as some people are imposing redistributive policies by force or threat of force on unconsenting others, we have inequality in authority between the coercers and the coerced, regardless of whether those doing the coercing are public citizens or private individuals, and regardless of whether they represent a majority or a minority. Nor would a Hobbesian jungle, where anyone is free to impose her will on anyone else, embody equality in authority; for as soon as one person does succeed in subordinating another, an inequality in authority emerges. The Hobbesian jungle might represent equal opportunity for authority, but in this context the libertarian favors equality of outcome. (That, incidentally, is why the right to liberty is inalienable.) Only defensive uses of force are justified, since these restore equality in authority rather than violating it. By the same token, an idealized democracy in which every citizen had an equal chance to get into a position of political power would also represent only equal opportunity for authority, not equality of outcome, and so would likewise offend against Lockean equality. To a libertarian, the saying 'anyone can grow up to become president,' if it were true, would have the same cheery ring as 'anyone might be the next person to assault you.' Inequality in authority is far more offensive, from a moral point of view, than mere socioeconomic inequality; hence, whenever the demands of socioeconomic equality conflict with the demands of libertarian equality, which they generally do, preference must be given to the latter... …an effective ban on socioeconomic inequality requires the endorsement of systematic initiatory force on a massive scale... Given the vast inequality in authority between the state apparatus and its subjects — given, for that matter, the vast socioeconomic inequality between them — how is it that so many who think of themselves as dedicated above all to human equality so readily become apologists for the state? Libertarians are often baffled at how those who appear so sensitive to constraints on choice, and to differences in bargaining power, when these derive from market factors, become so amazingly oblivious to the constraint on choice, and differential bargaining power, represented by the armed might of the state, empowered to enforce its demands by legalized violence. The fifth-century B.C. Chinese philosopher Mo-tzu once remarked that if someone can recognize an act of unjust aggression when it is perpetrated by one individual against another, but not when the same act is perpetrated by an organized group of individuals, such a person must be confused about right and wrong.[ Burton Watson, ed. & trans., Mo Tzu: Basic Writings (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963), pp. 50-51.] Socioeconomic egalitarians, then, must likewise be under some sort of confusion. But what, and why? A cynic might respond that socioeconomic egalitarians are not confused at all; their supposed devotion to equality is simply a disguise for powerlust, and they exempt the state from their criticisms because they plan to wield its reins, or at least to get in good with those who do. This strikes me as a fair analysis of some, but only some, socioeconomic egalitarians. Most of the socioeconomic egalitarians I know personally are sincere in their egalitarianism and well-meaning in their statism. I don't mean by this that they are entirely innocent; after all, an innocent statist would have to be one who says: ‘I recognize—as who could not?—that the coercive subordination of individuals to the state by the means of systematic legalized violence and the threat thereof is a great evil. But this evil is, unfortunately, necessary in order to prevent evils still greater.’ A statist who took this point of view could not be cheerful about her statism, but on the contrary would have to conduct herself with the tragic solemnity of Agamemenon sacrificing his daughter to save the fleet. The innocent statist, too, could hardly permit herself to reach this grim conclusion without first investigating possible alternatives—which, for a statist in the academy, would have to involve carefully researching and trying to refute (and desperately hoping to be unable to refute) the wealth of libertarian literature arguing that most of the other evils she cites can be prevented through nonstatist means. By these criteria, few statists qualify as innocent. To seek for alternatives to inequality in authority would be to acknowledge that statism involves such inequality before ascertaining that alternatives are available, and this would force upon the statist an unpleasant choice she prefers to avoid. Hence I regard statism as being, at least in most cases, a moral vice, rather than a mere cognitive mistake, in much the same way that racism and sexism are moral vices, not mere cognitive mistakes. But, again like racism and sexism, statism is the kind of moral vice that tends to enter the soul through self-deception, semi-conscious osmosis, and a kind of Arendtian banality, rather than through a forthright embrace; it is a form of spiritual blindness that can, and does, infect even those who are largely sincere and well-meaning. (Nor do I mean to suggest that libertarians are generally more virtuous than statists. Justice is only one virtue among many, and libertarianism is only one application of justice; so the only self-congratulatory moral we can draw is that we score higher on one aspect of one virtue than our statist colleagues do.) What form does this spiritual blindness take? On the one hand, statist ideology must render the violence of the state invisible, in order to disguise the affront to equality it represents. Hence statists tend to treat governmental edicts as though they were incantations, passing directly from decree to result, without the inconvenience of means; since in the real world the chief means employed by government is violence, threatened and actual, cloaking state decrees and their violent implementation in the garb of incantation disguises both the immorality and the inefficiency of statism by ignoring the messy path from decree to result. Yet on the other hand, the effectiveness of governmental edicts depends precisely on people being all too aware of the force backing up those edicts. Hence statism can maintain its plausibility only by implicitly projecting a kind of grotesque parody of the Catholic doctrine of transubstantiation: just as bread and wine must be transformed in their essence into the body and blood of Christ in order to play their necessary spiritual role, whilst at the same time they must retain the external accidents of bread and wine in order to play their necessary practical role, so the violence of the state, to be justified, must be transubstantiated in its essence into peaceful incantation, yet at the same time, to be effective, it must retain the external accidents of violence. (This sacralization of state violence explains how proponents of gun control, for example, can regard themselves as opponents of violence whilst at the same time threatening massive and systematic violence against peaceful citizens.) But to ignore or mask the violence upon which socioeconomic legislation necessarily rests is to acquiesce in the unconscionable subordination and subjection that such violence embodies. It is to treat those subordinated and subjected as mere means to the ends of those doing the subordinating, and thus to assume a legitimate inequality in power and jurisdiction between the two groups. The libertarian revulsion against such arrogant presumption is ipso facto an egalitarian impulse. Those who feel no such revulsion should not expect their egalitarian credentials to pass unquestioned; they may revere equality in theory, but they fail to recognize it in practice. ‘For as we passed by, and beheld their devotions, we found an altar with this inscription, TO THE UNKNOWN IDEAL. What therefore they ignorantly worship, that declare we unto them.’ For too long, we have allowed our misguided opponents to monopolize the banner of equality. We have more right to that banner than they do. The time has come to seize it back." - Roderick T. Long
a senior fellow of the Mises Institute and a professor of philosophy at Auburn University in Auburn, Alabama, USA. He runs the Molinari Institute and Molinari Society. He is the author of ‘Reason and Value: Aristotle Versus Rand’. Published in the Mises Daily: Tuesday, October 16, 2001. [http://www.mises.org/daily/804 ]
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[Quote No.42541] Need Area: Friends > General
"People always have been the foolish victims of deception and self-deception in politics, and they always will be until they have learnt to seek out the interests of some class or other [group] behind all moral, religious, political and social phrases, declarations and promises." - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
(1870 – 1924), Russian Marxist revolutionary, intellectual and politician who led the October Revolution of 1917. As the leader of the Bolsheviks, he headed the Soviet state during its initial years (1917–1924), as it fought to establish control of Russia in the Russian Civil War and worked to create a socialist economic system. As a politician, Lenin was a persuasive and charismatic orator. As an intellectual his extensive theoretic and philosophical developments of Marxism produced Marxism–Leninism, a pragmatic Russian application of Marxism that emphasized the critical role played by a committed and disciplined political vanguard in the revolutionary process, while defending the possibility of a socialist revolution in less advanced capitalist countries through an alliance of the proletarians with the rural peasantry. Quote from his essay, 'The Three Sources and Three Component Parts of Marxism', 1913. [http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42542] Need Area: Friends > General
"People always have been the foolish victims of deception and self-deception in politics, and they always will be until they have learnt to seek out the interests of some class or other [group] behind all moral, religious, political and social phrases, declarations and promises...And there is only one way of smashing the resistance of those classes, and that is to find, in the very society which surrounds us, the forces which can — and, owing to their social position, must — constitute the power capable of sweeping away the old and creating the new, and to enlighten and organise those forces for the struggle." - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
(1870 – 1924), Russian Marxist revolutionary, intellectual and politician who led the October Revolution of 1917. As the leader of the Bolsheviks, he headed the Soviet state during its initial years (1917–1924), as it fought to establish control of Russia in the Russian Civil War and worked to create a socialist economic system. As a politician, Lenin was a persuasive and charismatic orator. As an intellectual his extensive theoretic and philosophical developments of Marxism produced Marxism–Leninism, a pragmatic Russian application of Marxism that emphasized the critical role played by a committed and disciplined political vanguard in the revolutionary process, while defending the possibility of a socialist revolution in less advanced capitalist countries through an alliance of the proletarians with the rural peasantry. Quote from his essay, 'The Three Sources and Three Component Parts of Marxism', 1913. [http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42543] Need Area: Friends > General
"A standing army and police are the chief instruments of state power." - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
(1870 – 1924), Russian Marxist revolutionary, intellectual and politician who led the October Revolution of 1917. As the leader of the Bolsheviks, he headed the Soviet state during its initial years (1917–1924), as it fought to establish control of Russia in the Russian Civil War and worked to create a socialist economic system. As a politician, Lenin was a persuasive and charismatic orator. As an intellectual his extensive theoretic and philosophical developments of Marxism produced Marxism–Leninism, a pragmatic Russian application of Marxism that emphasized the critical role played by a committed and disciplined political vanguard in the revolutionary process, while defending the possibility of a socialist revolution in less advanced capitalist countries through an alliance of the proletarians with the rural peasantry. Quote from his essay, 'State and Revolution', 1917. [http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42546] Need Area: Friends > General
"[In the 19th and 20th centuries ordinary people expressed desires for a greater say in the political life of their country - for example democracy and the vote for all - and greater freedom and equality. They became the catchcries of many political parties. But equality, in particular, meant different things to different parties, as did the way they wanted to achieve power and implement it. Some meant equality of authority over themselves and equality of legal treatment, some meant equality of opportunity, others equality of outcome, some, as in the following quote, spoke of equality of the 'classes', means of production, labor and wages even followed by equal need satisfaction:] Democracy [as in his words a 'dictatorship of the proletariat' that is the class of wage-earners, especially industrial workers, in a capitalist society, whose only possession of significant material value is their labour] means equality. The great significance of the proletariat's struggle for equality and of equality as a slogan will be clear if we correctly interpret it as meaning the abolition of classes. But democracy means only formal equality. And as soon as equality is achieved for all members of society in relation to ownership of the means of production, that is, equality of labor and wages, humanity will inevitably be confronted with the question of advancing farther, from formal equality to actual equality, i.e., to the operation of the rule [stated by the 'father of Communism', Karl Marx] 'from each according to his ability, to each according to his needs'." - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
[1870 – 1924] a Russian revolutionary, author, lawyer, economic theorist, political philosopher, creator of the Soviet Communist Party, leader of the 1917 October Revolution, and founder of the USSR - United Soviet Socialist Republic. As head of the Bolsheviks (1917–1924) he led the Red Army to victory in the Russian Civil War, before establishing the world's first officially socialist state. As a theorist, his extensive theoretical and philosophical contributions to Marxism produced Leninism. Quote from his essay, 'The State and Revolution - The Economic Basis of the Withering Away of the State', 1917. [ http://www.marxists.org/archive/lenin/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42547] Need Area: Friends > General
"The Soviet [or any country's] bureaucracy [politicians, business people, unions, or social class, including the working class 'proletariat'] is like all ruling classes in that it is ready to shut its eyes to the crudest mistakes of its leaders in the sphere of general politics, provided in return they show an unconditional fidelity in the defense of its privileges. [This lack of intelligent, discretionary judgement leads to less accountability and therefore greater incompetence and widespread lack of transparency, deception and corruption in order for any issue, however necessary and rational, to get done despite the ruling class bias.]" - Leon Trotsky
(1879 – 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronshtein, he was a Russian Marxist revolutionary and theorist, Soviet politician, and the founder and first leader of the Red Army. He joined the Bolsheviks immediately prior to the 1917 October Revolution, and eventually became a leader within the Party. During the early days of the Soviet Union, he served first as People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs and later as the founder and commander of the Red Army as People's Commissar of Military and Naval Affairs. He was a major figure in the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War (1918–20). He was also among the first members of the Politburo. After leading a failed struggle of the Left Opposition against the policies and rise of Joseph Stalin in the 1920s and the increasing role of bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, Trotsky was successively removed from power, expelled from the Communist Party, deported from the Soviet Union and assassinated on Stalin's orders. An early advocate of Red Army intervention against European fascism, Trotsky also opposed Stalin's non-aggression pact with Adolf Hitler in the late 1930s. As the head of the Fourth International, Trotsky continued in exile to oppose the Stalinist bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, and was eventually assassinated in Mexico, by Ramón Mercader, a Spanish-born Soviet agent. Trotsky's ideas form the basis of Trotskyism, a major school of Marxist thought that is opposed to the theories of Stalinism. Quote from his work, 'Revolution Betrayed - Chapter 11: Whither the Soviet Union?', published 1936. [http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42548] Need Area: Friends > General
"If the [political] leaders seek only to preserve themselves, that is what they become; preserves, dried preserves." - Leon Trotsky
(1879 – 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronshtein, he was a Russian Marxist revolutionary and theorist, Soviet politician, and the founder and first leader of the Red Army. He joined the Bolsheviks immediately prior to the 1917 October Revolution, and eventually became a leader within the Party. During the early days of the Soviet Union, he served first as People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs and later as the founder and commander of the Red Army as People's Commissar of Military and Naval Affairs. He was a major figure in the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War (1918–20). He was also among the first members of the Politburo. After leading a failed struggle of the Left Opposition against the policies and rise of Joseph Stalin in the 1920s and the increasing role of bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, Trotsky was successively removed from power, expelled from the Communist Party, deported from the Soviet Union and assassinated on Stalin's orders. An early advocate of Red Army intervention against European fascism, Trotsky also opposed Stalin's non-aggression pact with Adolf Hitler in the late 1930s. As the head of the Fourth International, Trotsky continued in exile to oppose the Stalinist bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, and was eventually assassinated in Mexico, by Ramón Mercader, a Spanish-born Soviet agent. Trotsky's ideas form the basis of Trotskyism, a major school of Marxist thought that is opposed to the theories of Stalinism. Quote from his work, ‘Some Questions on American Problems' First published ‘Fourth International’, Vol.1 No.5, October 1940, pp.132-135.. [http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42554] Need Area: Friends > General
"The essence of Marxism [the socio-economic and political philosophy where socialism leads to communism] consists in this, that it approaches society concretely, as a subject for objective research, and analyzes human history as one would a colossal laboratory record. Marxism appraises ideology as a subordinate integral element of the material social structure. Marxism examines the class structure of society as a historically conditioned form of the development of the productive forces; Marxism deduces from the productive forces of society [the ‘means of production’ to meet human needs] the inter-relations between human society and surrounding nature, and these, in turn are determined at each historical stage by man’s technology, his instruments and weapons, his capacities and methods for struggle with nature. Precisely this objective approach [Marxists believe] arms Marxism with the insuperable power of historical foresight." - Leon Trotsky
(1879 – 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronshtein, he was a Russian Marxist revolutionary and theorist, Soviet politician, and the founder and first leader of the Red Army. He joined the Bolsheviks immediately prior to the 1917 October Revolution, and eventually became a leader within the Party. During the early days of the Soviet Union, he served first as People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs and later as the founder and commander of the Red Army as People's Commissar of Military and Naval Affairs. He was a major figure in the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War (1918–20). He was also among the first members of the Politburo. After leading a failed struggle of the Left Opposition against the policies and rise of Joseph Stalin in the 1920s and the increasing role of bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, Trotsky was successively removed from power, expelled from the Communist Party, deported from the Soviet Union and assassinated on Stalin's orders. An early advocate of Red Army intervention against European fascism, Trotsky also opposed Stalin's non-aggression pact with Adolf Hitler in the late 1930s. As the head of the Fourth International, Trotsky continued in exile to oppose the Stalinist bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, and was eventually assassinated in Mexico, by Ramón Mercader, a Spanish-born Soviet agent. Trotsky's ideas form the basis of Trotskyism, a major school of Marxist thought that is opposed to the theories of Stalinism. Quote from his work, ‘Dialectical Materialism and Science’ (1925). [http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42558] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Politics and social organisation: The socio-economic and political philosophies of free-market Capitalism, mixed-market Socialism and planned-economy Communism can be seen on a spectrum from capitalism’s individual citizen’s responsibility to meet their own needs to the degree and in the way that they choose and that suits them within their capacity and Communism’s the state’s, or in other words the citizens’, collective responsibility to meet their collective needs to the degree and in the way that they collectively choose and that suits them within the group’s capacity. Socialism is a mix of the two. They are all different ways of structuring society – the social contract - to allow people to meet their needs and desires within society. They differ though in some ways including the involvement of government and the state and the types of freedom and equality – of authority or outcome - that are supported. The following gives a communist perspective on meeting child education and housekeeping needs:] The workers’ state must become wealthier in order that it may be possible seriously to tackle the public education of children and the releasing of the family from the burden of the kitchen and the laundry. Socialization of family housekeeping and public education of children are unthinkable without a marked improvement in our economics as a whole. We need more socialist economic forms. Only under such conditions can we free the family from the functions and cares that now oppress and disintegrate it. Washing must be done by a public laundry, catering by a public restaurant, sewing by a public workshop. Children must be educated by good public teachers who have a real vocation for the work. Then the bond between husband and wife would be freed from everything external and accidental, and the one would cease to absorb the life of the other. Genuine equality would at last be established... A certain advance towards the new family is possible even now. It is true that the state cannot as yet undertake either the education of children or the establishment of public kitchens that would be an improvement on the family kitchen, or the establishment of public laundries where the clothes would not be torn or stolen. But this does not mean that the more enterprising and progressive families cannot group themselves even now into collective housekeeping units. Experiments of this kind must, of course, be made carefully. [Free-market Capitalism’s individual responsibility and freedom also does not exclude people from freely choosing to work in a co-operative group. It only tries to ensure that it is done freely, that is without force, coercion or fraud, by individuals or groups, including government, whether a democratic majority or not.]" - Leon Trotsky
(1879 – 1940), born Lev Davidovich Bronshtein, he was a Russian Marxist revolutionary and theorist, Soviet politician, and the founder and first leader of the Red Army. He joined the Bolsheviks immediately prior to the 1917 October Revolution, and eventually became a leader within the Party. During the early days of the Soviet Union, he served first as People's Commissar for Foreign Affairs and later as the founder and commander of the Red Army as People's Commissar of Military and Naval Affairs. He was a major figure in the Bolshevik victory in the Russian Civil War (1918–20). He was also among the first members of the Politburo. After leading a failed struggle of the Left Opposition against the policies and rise of Joseph Stalin in the 1920s and the increasing role of bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, Trotsky was successively removed from power, expelled from the Communist Party, deported from the Soviet Union and assassinated on Stalin's orders. An early advocate of Red Army intervention against European fascism, Trotsky also opposed Stalin's non-aggression pact with Adolf Hitler in the late 1930s. As the head of the Fourth International, Trotsky continued in exile to oppose the Stalinist bureaucracy in the Soviet Union, and was eventually assassinated in Mexico, by Ramón Mercader, a Spanish-born Soviet agent. Trotsky's ideas form the basis of Trotskyism, a major school of Marxist thought that is opposed to the theories of Stalinism. Quote from his work, ‘Vodka, the Church and the Cinema (1923). [http://www.marxists.org/archive/trotsky/quotes.htm ]
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[Quote No.42561] Need Area: Friends > General
"Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word, equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude." - Alexis de Tocqueville
(1805 - 1859), French historian and political scientist.
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[Quote No.42562] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Because of the omnipotent, intrusive and unpleasant government interference and force required to overcome unenlightened self-interest] Socialism is workable only in heaven where it isn't needed [because they are enlightened], and in hell where they've got it [and that's why it's Hell]." - Cecil Palmer

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[Quote No.42563] Need Area: Friends > General
"Most people who read 'The Communist Manifesto' probably have no idea that it was written by a couple of young men who had never worked a day in their lives, and who nevertheless spoke boldly in the name of 'the workers'." - Thomas Sowell
(1930 - ), American writer and economist.
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[Quote No.42564] Need Area: Friends > General
"Socialism values equality more than liberty." - Dennis Prager
Radio talk show host, author, lecturer
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[Quote No.42565] Need Area: Friends > General
"Many people consider the things which government does for them to be social progress, but they consider the things government does for others as socialism. [They are both socialism:- the coercive and sometimes violent taking of someone's property and giving it to another that the giver wants to like them as a consequence.]" - Earl Warren
(1891 - 1974), American Republican politician and judge.
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[Quote No.42567] Need Area: Friends > General
"Socialism is a fraud, a comedy, a phantom, a blackmail." - Benito Mussolini
(1883 - 1945), Italian fascist dictator.
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[Quote No.42568] Need Area: Friends > General
"A liberal [socialist or communist] is a person whose interests aren't at stake at the moment." - Willis Player

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[Quote No.42569] Need Area: Friends > General
"All socialism involves slavery [because socialism is about government forcefully taking and redistributing people's assets, property and money and thereby it does not recognise people's unalienable human right to freedom and private property, regardless of what a majority might democratically decide they want to take from you and give to someone else, usually including themselves]. " - Herbert Spencer
(1820 - 1903), British social Philosopher
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[Quote No.42570] Need Area: Friends > General
"A young man who isn't a socialist hasn't got a heart; an old man who is a socialist hasn't got a head." - David Lloyd George
(1863 - 1945), British Prime Minister.
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[Quote No.42573] Need Area: Friends > General
"Any war that requires the suspension of reason as a necessity for support is a bad war." - Norman Mailer

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[Quote No.42575] Need Area: Friends > General
"If there is ever a fascist takeover in America, it will come not in the form of storm troopers kicking down doors but with lawyers and social workers saying. 'I'm from the government and I'm here to help.' " - Jonah Goldberg
Quote from his book, 'Liberal Fascism: The Secret History of the American Left from Mussolini to the Politics of Meaning'.
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[Quote No.42578] Need Area: Friends > General
"Instead of giving a politician the keys to the city, it might be better to change the locks." - Doug Larson

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[Quote No.42579] Need Area: Friends > General
"The way people get their living determines their social outlook." - Karl Marx
The father of communism.
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[Quote No.42581] Need Area: Friends > General
"Socialism needs to pull down wealth; liberalism seeks to raise up poverty. Socialism would destroy private interests, Liberalism would preserve [them] ... by reconciling them with public right. Socialism would kill enterprise; Liberalism would rescue enterprise from the trammels of privilege and preference. Socialism assails the preeminence of the individual; Liberalism seeks ... to build up a minimum standard for the mass. Socialism exalts the rule; Liberalism exalts the man. Socialism attacks capitalism; Liberalism attacks monopoly." - Winston Churchill
British Prime Minister during World War II.
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[Quote No.42582] Need Area: Friends > General
"Crack-brained [political, military, social and economic] meddling by the authorities [can] aggravate an existing crisis." - Karl Marx
The 'Father of Communism'.
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[Quote No.42584] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is not what you can do for your country, but what you can do for all of mankind." - Mike Norton

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[Quote No.42586] Need Area: Friends > General
"It may be said of Socialism, therefore, that its friends recommended it as increasing equality, while its foes resisted it as decreasing liberty..." - G.K. Chesterton
Quote from his book, 'Eugenics and Other Evils: An Argument Against the Scientifically Organized State'.
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[Quote No.42587] Need Area: Friends > General
"I remained a socialist for several years, even after my rejection of Marxism; and if there could be such a thing as socialism combined with individual liberty, I would be a socialist still. For nothing could be better than living a modest, simple, and free life in an egalitarian society. It took some time before I recognized this as no more than a beautiful dream; that freedom is more important than equality; that the attempt to realize equality endangers freedom; and that, if freedom is lost, there will not even be equality among the unfree." - Karl R. Popper
(1902 – 1994), Austro-British philosopher and professor at the London School of Economics. He is generally regarded as one of the greatest philosophers of science of the 20th century; he also wrote extensively on social and political philosophy, including his vigorous defence of liberal democracy and the principles of social criticism that he came to believe made a flourishing 'open society' possible. Quote from his book, 'Unended Quest: An Intellectual Autobiography'.
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[Quote No.42589] Need Area: Friends > General
"Democracy extends the sphere of individual freedom; socialism restricts it. Democracy attaches all possible value to each man; socialism makes each man a mere agent, a mere number. Democracy and socialism have nothing in common but one word: equality. But notice the difference: while democracy seeks equality in liberty, socialism seeks equality in restraint and servitude." - Alexis de Tocqueville

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[Quote No.42591] Need Area: Friends > General
"[In politics] It is deliberate policy to keep even the favoured groups somewhere near the brink of hardship, because a general state of scarcity increases the importance of small privileges and thus magnifies the distinction between one group and another [and the power of the politicians and the government]." - George Orwell

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[Quote No.42593] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Friedrich August Hayek was a Nobel Prize winning economist and philosopher who is perhaps best known for his defense of classical liberalism, including free-market capitalism, where individual freedom is paramount in both economics and politics.] Hayek's is a philosophy that treats individuals as the best judges of their own self-interests, which in turn yields staggering communal cooperation [without force, coercion or fraud. It is one of Humanity's greatest cultural 'inventions'.]" - Jonah Goldberg
Quote from his book, 'The Tyranny of Clichés: How Liberals Cheat in the War of Ideas'.
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[Quote No.42594] Need Area: Friends > General
"[There are times when Karl Marx, the 'Father of Communism', does not sound like he is absolutely against free-market capitalism, private property and individual freedom. Rather he is for it or at least the benefits that it has been subsequently proven to provide better that the state socialism and communism he advocated and the force and loss of personal freedom that that entailed. He just does not want the dehumanising and dangerous working conditions and extreme long hours that were prevalent at the time he developed his ideas and which are a thing of the past today in most enlightened countries. Also he seems to believe that politics and economics in the early 1800's was not addressing these issues quickly enough and therefore he is almost desperately trying to suggest another way to achieve a better quality of life for workers without seeing the full negative ramifications of what his methods of putting material equality before individual freedom would have economically, socially and politically as they neither created the economic abundance, equality or freedom he believed they would for the average person. At least the following quote seems to suggest this although most of the rest of his writing does not. It makes you wonder if he lived today, would he still suggest the same ideas?] We by no means intend to abolish this personal appropriation [collection] of the products of labour [income], an appropriation that is made for the maintenance and reproduction of human life, and that leaves no surplus [savings and capital] wherewith to command the labour of others. All that we want to do away with is the miserable character of this appropriation [work], under which the labourer lives merely to increase capital, and is allowed to live only in so far as the interest of the ruling class requires it." - Karl Marx and Frederick Engels
Quote from the 'Manifesto of the Communist Party', published 1848. [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42595] Need Area: Friends > General
"[In general, socialists and communists do not appear to want a different ultimate result to capitalists or any other socio-economic political philosophy, namely a good life for all, or as many as possible. The philosophies do differ however in what they believe is a good life and how that can best be achieved. Therefore the ultimate end is a starting point for rational discussion, explanation and experimentation and with freedom for all to try what they believe is best, there is a good chance for people to find the way that best suits them and their situations at the time. Where we could have difficulty and therefore must be careful is, should any of us initiate force, coercion or fraud against anyone in the process or if there are scarce resources we cannot find alternative sources for or other sustitutes. So long as we stay tolerant, keep the lines of communication open, keep a willingness to find and try solutions and be patient and persistent, I have every confidence that things will work out well for us all.] And it is not our object to destroy civilization. We do not desire to 'divide up,' as people are in the habit of saying; we do not wish to throw humanity back into barbarism; on the contrary, we desire to lift the whole of humanity to the highest thinkable plane of civilization. We wish every individual without exception to have a share in the means of culture and education according to his capacities and his needs. This is the loftiest ideal that the human race can set before itself; and this ideal is possible today because it is only now that, in consequence of the thousands of years of progress towards civilization and of the tremendous acquisitions which man has gained in this age of culture; because only now are all the means and possibilities given through which we may realize this ideal condition in the way that the majority of men desire to realize it." - August Bebel
Quote from 'Socialism and the Student' (1905). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42596] Need Area: Friends > General
"[As the following two quotes show, Communism wanted freedom, but what that freedom would mean and how to obtain and keep it differed from other socio-economic political philosophies.] 'The popular masses who want peace, freedom and bread must, in this period of dark onrush of events, always hold themselves ready to spring up as one man against every danger...' - Antonio Gramsci, 'The development of fascism' (1921); and - 2) 'When wages have disappeared, when all are upon a basis of economic equality, when the position of manager, director, organiser, etc., brings no material advantage, the desire for it will be less widespread and less keen, and the danger of oppressive action by the management will be largely nullified. Nevertheless, management imposed on unwilling subordinates will not be tolerated; where the organiser has chosen the assistants, the assistants will be free to leave, or change him; where the assistants choose the organiser, they will be free to change him. Co-operation for the common good is necessary, but freedom, not domination, is the goal.' - E. Sylvia Pankhurst, 'Communism and its Tactics', (1921). [This is the continual challenge, how to provide individuals with the social environment they want. Luckily with time and experimentation societies are getting more experience and understanding of ways that meet different needs and how to mix them together. The difficulty however is that we are all different and therefore want slightly different things so individual freedom seems like it will be an important component along with tolerance of others so long as they don't initiate force, coercion or fraud.]" - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
[http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42597] Need Area: Friends > General
"The words Socialism and Communism have the same meaning. They indicate a condition of society in which the wealth of the community: the land and the means of production, distribution and transport are held in common, production being for use and not for profit." - Sylvia Pankhurst
Quote from her essay, 'Future Society', (1923). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42598] Need Area: Friends > General
"[It is without doubt that humans have empathy for others and value freedom for themselves and others. It is also true that people will fight and kill for their freedom. Freedom is a very necessary part of human need and the challenge for a happy world is how to achieve it for us all, peacefully.] All the martyrs of the working class...are victims of the same murderer: international capitalism. And it is always in belief in the liberation of their oppressed brothers, without discrimination as to race or country, that the souls of these martyrs will find supreme consolation. After experiencing these painful lessons, the oppressed people of all countries ought to know on which side their true brothers are, and on which side their enemy." - Ho Chi Minh
(1890 – 1969), Vietnamese Stalinist revolutionary leader who was prime minister (1945–1955) and president (1945–1969) of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (North Vietnam). He was a key figure in the foundation of the Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945, as well as the People's Army of Vietnam (PAVN) and the Viet Cong (NLF or VC) during the Vietnam War. He led the Viet Minh independence movement from 1941 onward, establishing the communist-governed Democratic Republic of Vietnam in 1945 and defeating the French Union in 1954 at Dien Bien Phu. He officially stepped down from power in 1955 due to health problems, but remained a highly visible figurehead and inspiration for Vietnamese fighting for his cause – a united, independent Vietnam – until his death. After the war, Saigon, capital of the Republic of Vietnam, was renamed Ho Chí Minh City in his honor. Quote from his short essay on the death of two comrades, 'Oppression Hits All Races', (1923). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42599] Need Area: Friends > General
"A revolution is not a dinner party, or writing an essay, or painting a picture, or doing embroidery; it cannot be so refined, so leisurely and gentle, so temperate, kind, courteous, restrained and magnanimous. A revolution is an insurrection, an act of violence by which one class overthrows another." - Mao Zedong
Chinese Communist leader. Quote from his, 'Report on an Investigation of the Peasant Movement in Hunan' (1927). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42600] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Equal rights seem to be understandably a universal desire within humans for the sake of justice and dignity:] Workers in the bourgeois countries must fight for equal rights for men and women." - Nadezhda K. Krupskaya
(1869 – 1939), Russian Bolshevik revolutionary and politician. She married the Russian revolutionary leader Vladimir Lenin in 1898. She was deputy minister (Comissar) of Education in 1929–1939, Doctor of Education. Quote from 'Preface to The Emancipation of Women in Writings of V.I. Lenin', (1933). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42601] Need Area: Friends > General
"The seizure of power by armed force, the settlement of the issue by war, is the central task and the highest form of revolution." - Mao Zedong
Chinese Communist leader. Quote from 'Problems of War and Strategy', (1938). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42602] Need Area: Friends > General
"...it is now, more than ever before, the duty of every State and its leaders not to permit actions which are capable of jeopardizing universal peace. That applies with all the more force to the leaders of the Great Powers." - Nikita Khrushchev
(1894, – 1971), he led the Soviet Union during part of the Cold War. He served as First Secretary of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union from 1953 to 1964, and as Chairman of the Council of Ministers, or Premier, from 1958 to 1964. Khrushchev was responsible for the partial de-Stalinization of the Soviet Union, for backing the progress of the early Soviet space program, and for several relatively liberal reforms in areas of domestic policy. Khrushchev's party colleagues removed him from power in 1964, replacing him with Leonid Brezhnev as First Secretary and Alexei Kosygin as Premier. Khrushchev was born in the Russian village of Kalinovka in 1894, close to the present-day border between Russia and Ukraine. He was employed as a metalworker in his youth, and during the Russian Civil War was a political commissar. With the help of Lazar Kaganovich, he worked his way up the Soviet hierarchy. He supported Joseph Stalin's purges, and approved thousands of arrests. In 1939, Stalin sent him to govern Ukraine, and he continued the purges there. In the power struggle triggered by Stalin's death in 1953, Khrushchev, after several years, emerged victorious. On February 25, 1956, at the 20th Party Congress, he delivered the 'Scret Speech,'denouncing Stalin's purges and ushering in a less repressive era in the Soviet Union. His domestic policies, aimed at bettering the lives of ordinary citizens, were often ineffective, especially in the area of agriculture. Hoping eventually to rely on missiles for national defense, Khrushchev ordered major cuts in conventional forces. Despite the cuts, Khrushchev's rule saw the tensest years of the Cold War, culminating in the Cuban Missile Crisis, in 1961, while John F. Kennedy was US President. Quote from 'Of What Freedom Are You Speaking?', (1961). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42603] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Equality along with freedom is something all humans want. What people mean by these terms and how they plan to get and maintain them differs however:] Socialism is not spontaneous. It does not arise of itself. It has abiding principles according to which the major means of production and distribution ought to be socialised if exploitation of the many by the few is to be prevented; if, that is to say, egalitarianism [equality] in the economy is to be protected." - Kwame Nkrumah
(1909 – 1972), leader of Ghana and its predecessor state, the Gold Coast, from 1951 to 1966. Overseeing the nation's independence from British colonial rule in 1957, Nkrumah was the first President of Ghana and the first Prime Minister of Ghana. An influential 20th-century advocate of Pan-Africanism, he was a founding member of the Organization of African Unity and was the winner of the Lenin Peace Prize in 1963. Quote from 'African Socialism Revisited', (1967). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42604] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Methods of political change differ. Some believe in peaceful discussion and voting in democratic elections. Others are prepared to use more force, which would be frowned on by most human rights and freedom respecting individuals, communities and countries.] We are, in principle, in favour of electoral activity but only as a subordinate form of activity, only as an auxiliary to direct working class action, never as an end in itself. We are for workers’ power on the basis of the direct rule of working class organisations, whatever specific form this may take. This involves far, far more elections but on a new basis... ’the abolition of state power is the goal of all socialists, including and above all Marx’... ‘Unless this goal is reached, true democracy, that is equality and freedom is not attainable.’ And the road to the abolition of state power is the road of revolution and the commune-state, not the road of reformist electoralism." - Duncan Hallas
(1925 - 2002), prominent member of the Trotskyist movement and a leading member of the Socialist Workers Party in Great Britain. Quote from 'Marx, Engels and the vote', (1983). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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[Quote No.42605] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Dignity, freedom and equality are universal human needs but what that means and how people plan to get and maintain them differs.] Ending terrorism is our task. It is the task of us who fight for people’s equality, for their rights and dignity. State terrorism will end by overthrowing terrorist states. Non-state terrorism must be eradicated by putting an end to the hardships, discrimination, exploitation and suppression that lead people to desperation and make them fall prey to reactionary and inhuman organisations. It can be eradicated by exposing religion, ethnicism, racism and any reactionary ideology, which has no respect for people. Our response is to fight for the creation of an open, free and equal society in which people, their lives, dignity and well being are valued." - Mansoor Hekmat
(1951 - 2002), original name Zhoobin Razani, he was an Iranian Marxist theorist and leader of the worker-communist movement. He opposed the Shah and, after the Islamic Revolution of 1979, led the Worker-Communist Party of Iran (WPI), which is opposed to the Islamic Republic of Iran. He was the husband of fellow politician Azar Majedi. Born in Tehran, and moved to Shiraz where he graduated in economics, at the University of Shiraz. He moved to London in 1973, where he was introduced to Marxist ideas and became a critic of what he saw as distorted versions of communism, including Russian communism, Chinese communism, the guerrilla warfare movement, social democracy and Trotskyism. He founded the Union of Communist Militants in 1978, then took part in the Iranian Revolution of 1979 – marked by the creation of workers' councils (shoras) — and, unlike the major part of the Iranian left-wing, refused to pay allegiance to Islamism and Supreme Leader Ruhollah Khomeini. He denounced the 'myth of a progressive national bourgeoisie'. Hekmat's views made him seek refuge in Kurdistan (1981); because of mounting repression, Hekmat's Union fused with a Kurdish group of Maoist roots, Komalah - together, they formed the Communist Party of Iran (CPI). Hekmat and a group of other CPI members left the party and, in 1991, founded the WPI. He also helped establish the Worker-Communist Party of Iraq. He died of cancer in his London refuge and was buried in Highgate Cemetery, a few meters away from Karl Marx's grave. Quote from 'Ending Terrorism is Our Task', (2001). [http://www.marxists.org/subject/quotes/miscellaneous.htm ]
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