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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.43938] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Throughout history the justification for foreign policies of continually expanding power, influence and territory have been remarkably similar:] Here is the classic example of that kind of insincerity in both foreign and domestic affairs which permeates not only avowed motives but also probably the conscious motives of the actors themselves - that of a policy which pretends to aspire to peace but unerringly generates war, the policy of continual preparation for war, the policy of meddlesome interventionism. There was no corner of the known world where some interest was not alleged to be in danger or under actual attack. If the interests were not those of Rome, they were those of Rome's allies; and if Rome had no allies, then allies would be invented. When it was utterly impossible to contrive such an interest - why, then it was the national honour that had been insulted. The fight was always invested with an aura of legality. Rome was always being attacked by evil-minded neighbours, always fighting for a breathing space. The whole world was pervaded by a host of enemies and it was manifestly Rome's duty to guard against their indubitably aggressive designs. They were enemies who only waited to fall on the Roman people...." - Joseph Schumpeter
'The Sociology of Imperialism', 1918.
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[Quote No.43942] Need Area: Friends > General
"You cannot slay other people's dragons, but you can help them prepare for the battle." - Dr. Mardy Grothe

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[Quote No.43973] Need Area: Friends > General
"Fraud is conducted by men [and women] with no convictions [i.e. moral principles], and ignored by those of no conviction [no understanding of the damage it does to the perception of justice and no empathy with those deceived]." - John Ward
[http://hat4uk.wordpress.com/2012/08/10/fraud-is-conducted-by-men-with-no-convictions-and-ignored-by-those-of-no-conviction/ ]
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[Quote No.43974] Need Area: Friends > General
"We believe in the minimum necessary government which defends individual freedom, supports those in real need, takes as little of our money as possible, and doesn't interfere in our lives." - UK Independence Party Creed
[http://globaleconomicanalysis.blogspot.com.au/2012/08/europes-most-dangerous-politicians.html?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed:+MishsGlobalEconomicTrendAnalysis+(Mish's+Global+Economic+Trend+Analysis)]
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[Quote No.44000] Need Area: Friends > General
"Just because you do not take an interest in politics doesn't mean politics won't take an interest in you." - Pericles
430 BC
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[Quote No.44003] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Individual Freedom Versus Mass 'Slavery':] Man in any complex society can have no choice but between adjusting himself to what to him must seem the blind forces of the social [free market] process and obeying the orders of a superior ['master']. So long as he knows only the hard discipline of the market, he may well think the direction by some other intelligent human brain [or brains as in a government by politicians] preferable; but, when he tries it, he soon discovers that the former still leaves him at least some choice, while the latter leaves him none, and that it is better to have a choice between unpleasant alternatives than being coerced into one." - F. A. Hayek
Nobel Prize winning Austrian School economist in his book, 'Individualism: True and False'.
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[Quote No.44004] Need Area: Friends > General
"[There is a great deal of muddled discussion about equality in socio-economic and political discussions ranging from equality of opportunity to equality of socio-economic outcome. This is because people fail to define what they mean by the term ‘equality’. When libertarians, who regard freedom as the most important socio-economic and political value, use the word ‘equality’ or] 'EQUAL LIBERTY', e.g. the insistence on EQUAL IMMUNITY FROM INTERFERENCE by others [is what they mean. This is called a negative human right, which is possible for all as a universal ethic or standard of morality, rather than the EQUAL ABILITY TO DO, HAVE, BE the same as others, called a positive human right, which is not possible for all. In fact for every positive right taken by one individual or group requires the loss of a negative right, to freedom from interference, for another individual or group – so their gain is only at the non-voluntary, and therefore coercive, loss of others. To libertarians this is unequal and immoral.]" - Amartya Sen
‘Inequality Reexamined’ (Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1992), pp. 21-23. [http://mises.org/daily/804 ]
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[Quote No.44005] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is important to remember that government interference always means either violent action or the threat of such action. [Therefore to libertarians, who value freedom and individual voluntary choice as the highest socio-economic and political value, this is immoral.] The funds that a government spends for whatever purposes are levied by taxation. And taxes are paid because the taxpayers are afraid of offering resistance to the tax gatherers. They know that any disobedience or resistance is hopeless. As long as this is the state of affairs, the government is able to collect the money that it wants to spend. Government is in the last resort the employment of armed men, of policemen, gendarmes, soldiers, prison guards, and hangmen. The essential feature of government is the enforcement of its decrees by beating, killing, and imprisoning. Those who are asking for more government interference are asking ultimately for more compulsion and less freedom. " - Ludwig von Mises
Quote from his book, ‘Human Action’ XXVII. 2. [http://mises.org/daily/804 ]
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[Quote No.44006] Need Area: Friends > General
"The fifth-century B.C. Chinese philosopher Mo-tzu once remarked that if someone can recognize an act of unjust aggression when it is perpetrated by one individual against another, but not when the same act is perpetrated by an organized group of individuals [such as a government], such a person must be confused about right and wrong." - Mo-tzu
The fifth-century B.C. Chinese philosopher. Quote from Burton Watson, ed. & trans., ‘Mo Tzu: Basic Writings’ (New York: Columbia University Press, 1963), pp. 50-51. [http://mises.org/daily/804 ]
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[Quote No.44013] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Beware 'power-mad' politicians who believe they are above the legal requirements of the representational democracies they are in and therefore do not need to listen to or get the agreement of their parliaments. For example as stated in the following quote:] Monti: I can understand that they must show consideration for their parliament. But at the end of the day, every country in the European Union has a parliament as well as a constitutional court. And of course each government must orient itself according to decisions made by parliament. But every government also has a duty to educate parliament. If I had stuck to the guidelines of my parliament in an entirely mechanical way, then I wouldn't even have been able to agree to the decisions that were made at the most recent (EU) summit in Brussels. SPIEGEL: Why not? Monti: I was given the task of pushing through euro bonds at the summit. If governments let themselves be fully bound by the decisions of their parliaments without protecting their own freedom to act, a breakup of Europe would be a more probable outcome than deeper integration." - Mario Monti
Italian Prime Minister as quoted in an interview with Germany's 'Der Spiegel', published 8th June, 2012. [http://www.spiegel.de/international/europe/interview-on-the-euro-crisis-with-italian-prime-minister-mario-monti-a-848511.html ]
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[Quote No.44033] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Most wars, in order to win the 'hearts and minds' of the public, are politically started by 'false flag' tactics or by extreme provocation, as well as political opportunism or simply the need to distract the public from political or economic issues at home. U.S. Senator (Kentucky Republican) Paul Rand, in his biographical book, 'The Tea Party Goes to Washington',] ...offers a startling quotation from Gen. Hugh Shelton, former head of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. He reports that a White House official asked him, long before Sept. 11 [2001], if he could float a U-2 plane over Saddam Hussein's military installations so that it could be shot down and precipitate a war [with Iraq]. Shelton declined on grounds that he would not murder an American soldier. [Saddam Hussein was President of Iraq, which the US invaded after the '9-11' terrorist attacks with hijacked passenger planes flying into the World Trade Centre buildings in New York, 11th September, 2001, even though there was no public evidence of Iraqi involvement.]" - Jeffrey Tucker
Published 15th August, 2012. [http://lfb.org/today/rand-pauls-tea-party-manifesto/ ]
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[Quote No.44036] Need Area: Friends > General
"The Myth of [Utilitarianism’s moral ethic of] the Greater Good: In entry-level philosophy class, a professor will often present the a scenario that seems to challenge the students' perspective on morality. The argument runs something as follows: ‘The entire nation of France will drop dead tomorrow unless you kill your neighbor who has only one day to live. What do you do?’ Or ‘You could eliminate cancer by pressing a button that also kills one healthy person. Do you do so?’ The purpose is to create a moral dilemma. The questions pit your moral rejection of murder against your moral guilt for not acting to save millions of lives. In reality, the questions are a sham that cannot be honestly answered. They postulate a parallel world in which the rules of reality, like cause and effect, have been dramatically changed so that pushing a button cures cancer. The postulated world seems to operate more on magic than reality. Because my moral code is based on the reality of the existing world, I don't know what I would do if those rules no longer operated. I presume my morality would be different, so my actions would be as well. As absurd as they are, these are considered to be the ‘tough’ moral questions. In grappling with them, some students come to believe that being true to morality requires the violation of morality in a profound manner; after all, there is no greater violation than the deliberate murder of another human being. But how can the life of one outweigh those of millions in your hands? At this point, morality becomes a numbers game, a matter of cost-benefit analysis, rather than of principle. This is not an expansion of morality, as the professor claims, but the manufacture of a conflict that destroys morality. In its place is left a moral gray zone, a vacuum into which utilitarianism rushes. Suddenly, it becomes obvious that the good of the many outweighs the murder of the one. The collective outweighs the individual. The majority outranks the minority. Hard ‘factual’ utilitarianism is preferable to gray, inconsistent morality. The philosophical questions lead directly into politics because murdering a person for the greater good is not merely a moral question, but also one of individual rights. If you accept the morality of doing so, you have also accepted the political propriety of murdering an innocent human being. Phrased in political terms, non-hypothetical versions of the philosophy question come up often. For example, ‘Should the rich or businessmen (the few) be heavily taxed to provide national health care (for the many)?’ Here, a greater good is pitted against individual rights. But more than this, individual rights of two groups conflict, with the rights of a resisting minority viewed as a barrier to the ‘rights’ or entitlements of ‘the others.’ Businessmen are deemed to have no right to their earnings if it prevents the majority from having health care. This politically manufactured conflict is as absurd as the philosophically manufactured one. The 19th-century British individualist Auberon Herbert addressed the issue of the ‘good of the greatest number.’ He stated, ‘There never was invented a more specious and misleading phrase. The Devil was in his most subtle and ingenious mood when he slipped this phrase into the brains of men. I hold it to be utterly false in essentials.’ Why is it false? Because the phrase assumes as a given that a higher morality requires the violation of individual rights. Or in Herbert's words, ‘It assumes that there are two opposed 'goods,' and that the one good is to be sacrificed to the other good - but in the first place, this is not true, for liberty is the one good, open to all, and requiring no sacrifice of others, and secondly, this false opposition (where no real opposition exists) of two different goods means perpetual war between men.’ Herbert is relying on two intimately related theories: first, ‘the universality of rights’; and, second, ‘a natural harmony of interests.’ The universality of rights means that every individual has the same natural rights to an equal degree. Race, gender, religion or other secondary characteristics do not matter; only the primary characteristic of being human is important. A natural harmony of interests means that the peaceful exercise of one person's individual rights does not harm the similar exercise by any other person. My freedom of conscience or speech does not negate my neighbor's. The peaceful jurisdiction I claim over my own body does not diminish anyone else's claim of self-ownership. Indeed, the more I assert the principle of self-ownership, the stronger and more secure that principle becomes for everyone. Only in a world where rights are not universal, where people's peaceful behavior conflicts, does it make sense to accept the need to sacrifice individuals to a greater good. This is not the real world, but one that has been manufactured for political purposes. Herbert explained a key assumption that underlies this [sophists’] faux world: the acceptance of the ‘greater good’ itself. He asked, ‘Why are two men to be sacrificed to three men? We all agree that the three men are not to be sacrificed to the two men; but why - as a matter of moral right - are we to do what is almost as bad and immoral and short-sighted - sacrifice the two men to the three men? Why sacrifice any one... when liberty does away with all necessity of sacrifice?’ Herbert denied the validity of ‘this law of numbers, which... is what we really mean when we speak of State authority...under which three men are made absolutely supreme, and two men are made absolutely dependent.’ Instead of accepting the law of numbers as an expression of greater good, Herbert viewed it as a convenient social construct, calling it ‘a purely conventional law, a mere rude, half-savage expedient, which cannot stand the criticism of reason, or be defended... by considerations of universal justice. You can only plead expediency of it.’ To whom was the social construct of conflict convenient? Why would a faux world of inherent conflict be created? By solving the manufactured problems, a great deal of power was transferred from individuals to a ruling class. Herbert wrote, ‘The tendency of all great complicated machines is to make a ruling class, for they alone understand the machine, and they alone are skilled in the habit of guiding it; and the tendency of a ruling expert class, when once established, is that at critical moments they do pretty nearly what they like with the nation...’ Rather than solve a social problem, the ruling class had a devastating effect on the welfare of common people, who became ‘a puzzled flock of sheep waiting for the sheepdog to drive us through the gate.’ Ironically, by claiming the collective was greater, the few were able to assume control over the many. The ‘greater good’ devolved to whatever served the interests of the ruling class. But the process can be reversed. It requires ‘individualizing’ the collective and the nation so that ‘will, conscience and judgment’ can return to every person. At that point, society offers people ‘the noblest present’ and the greatest benefit possible - ‘their own personal responsibility.’ " - Wendy McElroy
author, lecturer and freelance writer, and a senior associate of the Laissez Faire Club. [http://lfb.org/today/the-myth-of-the-greater-good/ ]
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[Quote No.44039] Need Area: Friends > General
"Good government is the outcome of private virtue." - John Jay Chapman

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[Quote No.44040] Need Area: Friends > General
"Our goodness comes solely from thinking on goodness; our wickedness from thinking on wickedness. We too are the victims of our own contemplation." - John Jay Chapman

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[Quote No.44042] Need Area: Friends > General
"The question of who is right and who is wrong has seemed to me always too small to be worth a moment's thought, while the question of what is right and what is wrong has seemed all-important." - Albert J. Nock

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[Quote No.44044] Need Area: Friends > General
"Trust everybody, but cut the cards." - Finley Peter Dunne

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[Quote No.44045] Need Area: Friends > General
"There are no friends at cards or world politics." - Finley Peter Dunne

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[Quote No.44056] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Here's a moral metaphor:] It's easier to go down a hill than up it but the view is much better at the top." - Henry Ward Beecher

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[Quote No.44059] Need Area: Friends > General
"Communism, the New Deal, Fascism, Naziism, are merely so many trade-names for collectivist Statism [i.e. big government power and authority reducing individual liberty and reponsibility], like the trade-names for toothpaste which are exactly the same except for the flavoring." - Albert J. Nock

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[Quote No.44064] Need Area: Friends > General
"Little else is requisite to carry a state to the highest degree of opulence from the lowest barbarism, but peace, easy taxes, and a tolerable administration of justice: all the rest being brought about by the natural course of things!" - Adam Smith
(1723-1790) Scottish philosopher and economist. Source: Lecture in 1755, quoted in Dugald Stewart's 'Account Of The Life And Writings Of Adam Smith', Section IV, 25.
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[Quote No.44068] Need Area: Friends > General
"The uniform, constant, and uninterrupted effort of every man to better his condition ... is frequently powerful enough to maintain the natural progress of things toward improvement, in spite of the extravagance of government, and of the greatest errors of administration." - Adam Smith
(1723-1790) Scottish philosopher and economist
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[Quote No.44070] Need Area: Friends > General
"The man of system... seems to imagine that he can arrange the different members of a great society with as much ease as the hand arranges the different pieces upon a chess-board. He does not consider that in the great chess-board of human society, every single piece has a principle of [freedom and] motion of its own, altogether different from that which the legislature might choose to impress [and forcefully impose] upon it." - Adam Smith
(1723-1790) Scottish philosopher and economist. Source: 'The Theory Of Moral Sentiments', Part VI, Section II, Chapter II, pp. 233-4.
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[Quote No.44090] Need Area: Friends > General
"Under what circumstances is it moral for a group to do that which is not moral for a member of the group to do alone?...[This is]...the key question... [a] radical question that strikes to the root of the whole dilemma of government [authority and the individual human right to liberty]." - Robert A. Heinlein
Science fiction writer. Quote from his winner of the Hugo award as the best science fiction novel of 1966, 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress'. Quote from the character Professor Bernardo de la Paz.
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[Quote No.44092] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Libertarian individual liberty and choice:] Anyone who wishes is entitled to make the personal decision of 'better dead than Red' or 'give me liberty or give me death.' What he is not entitled to do is to make these decisions for others, as the pro-war policy of conservatism would do. What conservatives are really saying is: 'Better them dead than Red,' and 'give me liberty or give them death' — which are the battle cries not of noble heroes but of mass murderers." - Murray Rothbard
[1926–1995], an American author and economist of the Austrian School who helped define modern libertarianism. Quote from his book, 'For A New Liberty: The Libertarian Manifesto'
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[Quote No.44096] Need Area: Friends > General
"Kindness makes a fellow feel good whether it's being done to him or by him." - Frank A. Clark

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[Quote No.44098] Need Area: Friends > General
"The drying up a single tear has more of honest fame, than shedding seas of gore." - Lord Byron

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[Quote No.44099] Need Area: Friends > General
"The best revenge is massive success [and/or a happy life]." - Frank Sinatra

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[Quote No.44103] Need Area: Friends > General
"All this [political public relations spin] was inspired by the principle – which is quite true in itself – that in the big lie there is always a certain force of credibility; because the broad masses of a nation are always more easily corrupted in the deeper strata of their emotional nature than consciously or voluntarily; and thus in the primitive simplicity of their minds they more readily fall victims to the big lie than the small lie, since they themselves often tell small lies in little matters but would be ashamed to resort to large - scale falsehoods. It would never come into their heads to fabricate colossal untruths, and they would not believe that others could have the impudence to distort the truth so infamously. Even though the facts which prove this to be so may be brought clearly to their minds, they will still doubt and waver and will continue to think that there may be some other explanation. For the grossly impudent lie always leaves traces behind it, even after it has been nailed down, a fact which is known to all expert liars [and sociopaths] in this world and to all who conspire together in the art of lying." - Adolph Hitler
Quote from his book, 'Mein Kampf'.
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[Quote No.44107] Need Area: Friends > General
"[To keep morale of troops and the general public high...] War is a game that is played with a smile. If you can't smile, grin. If you can't grin, keep out of the way till you can!" - Winston Churchill
Prime Minister of Great Britain during World War II.
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[Quote No.44113] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Most] People travel in the way of least resistance..." - H. Janicki

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[Quote No.44118] Need Area: Friends > General
"Whoever rewards evil for good, evil will not depart from their house." - Bible

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[Quote No.44126] Need Area: Friends > General
"[The Golden Rule of most religions and the basis for most social ethical systems is reciprocity - 'Treat others as you would like to be treated' but also never forget your own 'enlightened self-interst' for...] If I am not for myself, who will be for me?" - Rabbi Hillel

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[Quote No.44129] Need Area: Friends > General
"Revenge has no more quenching effect on emotions than salt water has on thirst." - Walter Weckler

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[Quote No.44132] Need Area: Friends > General
"People who treat other people [racistly and] as less than human must not be surprised when the bread they have cast on the waters comes floating back to them, poisoned." - James Baldwin

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[Quote No.44138] Need Area: Friends > General
"Effective managers [politicians and bureaucrats] live in the present but concentrate on the future. " - James L. Hayes

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[Quote No.44140] Need Area: Friends > General
"The intoxication of anger, like that of the grape, shows us to others, but hides us from ourselves." - Charles Caleb Colton

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[Quote No.44143] Need Area: Friends > General
"Politics is like a race horse. A good jockey must know how to fall with the least possible damage." - Edouard Herriot

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[Quote No.44147] Need Area: Friends > General
"Calamity is the test of integrity [and morality]." - Samuel Richardson

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[Quote No.44148] Need Area: Friends > General
"A man's vanity [self-respect] tells him what is honor; a man's conscience [morality] what is justice." - Walter Savage Landor

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[Quote No.44155] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is the responsibility of our judicial system to protect the public from acts of Congress [government and politicians] which infringe upon constitutional rights." - Katherine B. Forrest
U.S. District Judge. Quote from 'The Freedom 7 Are Beating Obama in Court' by Kelley B. Vlahos, August 14, 2012.
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[Quote No.44156] Need Area: Friends > General
"If the alternative we face is between grappling with market forces and trusting a ruling elite to orchestrate just social outcomes, anyone concerned with autonomy [freedom] and equality [of treatment] should choose the market." - Sheldon Richman
Quote from 'Market, State, and Autonomy'.
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[Quote No.44157] Need Area: Friends > General
"[The right to bear arms and own private weapons for sport, hunting and self-defence:] The most foolish mistake we could possibly make would be to allow the subject races to possess arms. History shows that all conquerors who have allowed their subject races to carry arms have prepared their own downfall by so doing." - Adolph Hitler
Quote from 'Hitler's Secret Conversations', published 1961.
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[Quote No.44183] Need Area: Friends > General
"The best people possess a feeling for beauty, the courage to take risks, the discipline to tell the truth, the capacity for sacrifice. Ironically, their virtues make them vulnerable; they are often wounded, sometimes destroyed." - Ernest Hemingway
(1899-1961), author, journalist and Nobel laureate.
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[Quote No.44192] Need Area: Friends > General
"Peace will come to earth when the people have more to do with each other and governments less." - Richard Cobden
19th century British manufacturer and Liberal statesman, who championed 'laissez-faire' concepts which at the time were called 'Cobdenism'. [http://www.cobdencentre.org/ ]
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[Quote No.44193] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Free trade and no foreign political entanglements:] The great rule of conduct for us in regard to foreign nations is - in extending our commercial relations - to have with them as little political connection as possible." - Richard Cobden
19th century British manufacturer and Liberal statesman, who championed 'laissez-faire' concepts which at the time were called 'Cobdenism'. [refer http://www.cobdencentre.org/ ]
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[Quote No.44194] Need Area: Friends > General
"[The ideas of 19th century British manufacturer and Liberal statesman, Richard Cobden, called 'Cobdenism' and later identified with 'laissez-faire'] ...stand out in almost complete opposition to the 'gospel' according to Marx: Cobden's international ideas were based on patriotism and peace, the harmony of classes, reform by constitutional methods, goodwill among men and nations. Cobden...believed in individual liberty and enterprise, in free markets, freedom of opinion and freedom of trade. [His] whole creed was anathema to Karl Marx. He [Karl Marx] had no sense of patriotism or love of country. He urged what he called 'the proletariat' in all countries to overthrow society by a violent revolution, to destroy the middle classes and all employers of labour, whom he denounced as capitalists and slave drivers. He demanded the confiscation of private property and a new dictatorship, the dictatorship of the proletariat. Just as Cobden interpreted and practised the precepts of Adam Smith, so Lenin interpreted and practised the precepts of Karl Marx. These two great men though dead yet speak. They stand out before the civilised world as protagonists of two systems of political economy, political thought and human society [i.e. free market capitalism versus communism]...when this war is over, we in Britain will certainly have to choose whether our Press and Parliament are to be free, whether we are to be a conscript nation, whether private property and savings are to be secured or confiscated, whether we are to be imprisoned without trial; whether we are again to enjoy the right of buying and selling where and how we please — in short whether were are to be ruled as slaves by the bureaucracy of a Police State or as free men by our chosen representatives. This conflict will be symbolised and personified by Richard Cobden and Karl Marx." - F. W. Hirst
Quote from 1941, during the Second World War, as published in 'Richard Cobden and John Morley. Being the Richard Cobden Lecture for 1941' (The Cobden Club, 1941), pp. 37-38. [refer http://www.cobdencentre.org/ ]
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[Quote No.44216] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Hundreds of years before The United States of America's Declaration of Independence the Scottish declared their independence from England, with a written declaration that included at least two of the same concepts. These were: 1) their belief in 'popular sovereignty' – that government is contractual and that kings can be chosen by the community rather than by God alone and; 2) that they have a right to be free, as the following excerpt shows.] ...But from these countless evils we have been set free, by the help of Him Who though He afflicts yet heals and restores, by our most tireless Prince, King and Lord, the Lord Robert. He, that his people and his heritage might be delivered out of the hands of our enemies, met toil and fatigue, hunger and peril, like another Macabaeus or Joshua and bore them cheerfully. Him, too, divine providence, his right of succession according to or laws and customs which we shall maintain to the death, and the due consent and assent of us all have made our Prince and King. To him, as to the man by whom salvation has been wrought unto our people, we are bound both by law and by his merits that our freedom may be still maintained, and by him, come what may, we mean to stand. Yet if he should give up what he has begun, and agree to make us or our kingdom subject to the King of England or the English, we should exert ourselves at once to drive him out as our enemy and a subverter of his own rights and ours, and make some other man who was well able to defend us our King; for, as long as but a hundred of us remain alive, never will we on any conditions be brought under English rule. It is in truth not for glory, nor riches, nor honours that we are fighting, but for freedom — for that alone, which no honest man gives up but with life itself..." - The Declaration of Arbroath
The Declaration of Arbroath is a declaration of Scottish independence, made in 1320. It is in the form of a letter submitted to Pope John XXII, dated 6 April 1320, intended to confirm Scotland's status as an independent, sovereign state and defending Scotland's right to use military action when unjustly attacked. It is generally believed to have been written in the Arbroath Abbey by Bernard of Kilwinning, then Chancellor of Scotland and Abbot of Arbroath and sealed by fifty-one magnates and nobles.
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[Quote No.44217] Need Area: Friends > General
"Most religions have an ethic or morality based around the idea of reciprocity, often simply referred to as 'The Golden Rule' of social relations namely, 'Treat others as you would like to be treated' [for the way it makes you feel about yourself at the time - your self-respect and self-esteem - and for the way you may be treated by them or others in the future and rewarded or punished after death, as in the Christian concepts of 'Heaven and Hell' and the concept of Karma - 'What goes around comes around' in this and future incarnations - in Jainism, Hinduism and Buddhism.]" - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.44226] Need Area: Friends > General
"If there is to be peace in the world, There must be peace in the nations. If there is to be peace in the nations, There must be peace in the cities. If there is to be peace in the cities, There must be peace between neighbors. If there is to be peace between neighbors, There must be peace in the home. If there is to be peace in the home, There must be peace in the heart." - Lao-Tse

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[Quote No.44227] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Morality and ethics:] The 'Golden Choice', ‘Golden Rule’, ‘Golden Law’ or ‘Ethic of Reciprocity’ is a maxim, ethical code, or voluntary morality that essentially states either of the following: (Positive form): ‘One should freely choose to treat others as one would like others to treat oneself’; (Negative/prohibitive form, also called the ‘Silver Rule’): ‘One should freely choose to not treat others in ways that one would not like to be treated.’ The equivalent of the Golden Rule is found in the scriptures of nearly every religion. It is often regarded as the most concise and general principle of ethics. The following shows a sample of this wisdom expressed in many different religions - BAHAI'I, BUDDHISM, CHRISTIANITY, CONFUCIANISM, HINDUISM, ISLAM [An adherent of Islam is known as a Muslim], JAINISM, JUDAISM, LATTER-DAY SAINTS [Also known as Mormonism], QUAKERISM, SHINTOISM, SIKHISM, SUFISM, TAOISM, UNITARIANISM, ZOROASTRIANISM - belief systems - AFRICAN, EGYPTIAN [ANTIQUITY], GREEK [ANTIQUITY], HUMANISM, LIBERTARIAN, NATIVE AMERICAN, PERSIAN [ANTIQUITY], ROMAN [ANTIQUITY], SCIENTOLOGY, UTILITARIANISM, WICCA, OTHER – and folklore – in the form of ‘the long spoons allegory’ in the cultures of BUDDHISTS, CHRISTIANS, HINDUS, JEWS and ORIENTALS: === RELIGIONS=== --- BAHAI'I: - ‘Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.’ {Bahá'u'lláh, Tablets of Bahá'u'lláh} - ‘Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.’ {Udana-Varga, 5:18} - ‘Oh Son of Being! Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not. This is My command unto thee, do thou observe it.’ {Arabic Hidden Words [I have also seen this attributed to Bahá'u'lláh]} - ‘And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself.’ {Epistle to the Son of the Wolf} - ‘Wish not for others what ye wish not for yourselves.’ {Kitab-I-Aqdas} - ‘Lay not upon any soul a load that you would not wish to be laid upon you, and desire not for anyone the things you would not desire for yourself.’ {Baha'u'llah Gleanings} - ‘He should not wish for others what he does not wish for himself.’ {Baha'u'llah Buddhism} - ‘Is there a deed, Rahula, thou dost wish to do? Then bethink thee thus: Is this deed conducive to my own harm, or to others harm, or to that of both? Then is this a bad deed entailing suffering. Such a deed must thou surely not do.’ {Majjhima Nikaya 1.415} - ‘The Ariyan disciple thus reflects, Here am I, fond of my life, not wanting to die, fond of pleasure and averse from pain. Suppose someone should rob me of my life... it would not be a thing pleasing and delightful to me. If I, in my turn, should rob of his life one fond of his life, not wanting to die, one fond of pleasure and averse to pain, it would not be a thing pleasing or delightful to him. For a state that is not pleasant or delightful to me must also be to him also; and a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, how could I inflict that upon another? As a result of such reflection he himself abstains from taking the life of creatures and he encourages others so to abstain, and speaks in praise of so abstaining.’ {Samyutta Nikaya v.353} - ‘All beings love life. All beings fear death. Knowing this the wise man does not kill nor cause to kill.’ {Dhammapadha} - ‘In five ways should a clansman minister to his friends and familiars, by treating them as he treats himself.’ {Sigalovada Sutta v 31} - ‘Comparing oneself to others in such terms as ‘Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I,’ he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.’ {Sutta Nipata v 705} - ‘Hurt not others in ways that you would find hurtful.’ {Tripitaka Udana-varga 5:18} - ‘...a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, how could I inflict that upon another?’ Samyutta {NIkaya v. 353} - ‘Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.’ {Tripitaka Udana-Varga 5:18} --- BUDDHISM: - ‘All beings love life. All beings fear death. Knowing this the wise man does not kill nor cause to kill.’ {Buddha, Dhammapadha} - ‘Treat not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.’ {Udana-Varga 5.18} - ‘I will act towards others exactly as I would act towards myself.’ {The Siglo-Vada Sutta} - ‘‘The Ariyan disciple thus reflects, ‘Here am I, fond of my life, not wanting to die, fond of pleasure and averse from pain. Suppose someone should rob me of my life... it would not be a thing pleasing and delightful to me. If I, in my turn, should rob of his life one fond of his life, not wanting to die, one fond of pleasure and averse from pain, it would not be a thing pleasing or delightful to him. For a state that is not pleasant or delightful to me must also be to him also; and a state that is not pleasing or delightful to me, how could I inflict that upon another?’ As a result of such reflection he himself abstains from taking the life of creatures and he encourages others so to abstain, and speaks in praise of so abstaining.’’ {Samyutta Nikaya v.353} - ‘One should seek for others the happiness one desires for one's self.’ {Buddhist - unattributed} --- CHRISTIANITY: - ‘Therefore, whatever you want men to do to you, do also to them, for this is the Law and the Prophets.’ {Yahshua, Matthew 7:12} - ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ {Yahshua, Matthew 22:39} - ‘Give to everyone who asks you, and if anyone takes what belongs to you, do not demand it back. Do to others as you would have them do to you.’ {Luke 6.30-31} - ‘And, behold, a certain lawyer stood up, and tempted him, saying, Master, what shall I do to inherit eternal life? He said unto him, What is written in the law? How readest thou? And he answering said, Thou shalt love the Lord thy God with all thy heart, and with all thy soul, and with all thy strength, and with all thy mind; and thy neighbor as thyself. And he said unto him, Thou hast answered right: do this, and thou shalt live.’ {Luke 10:25-28} - ‘Whatever you wish that men would do to you, do so to them.’ {Matthew 7.12} - ‘Teacher, which is the great commandment in the law?’ Jesus said to him, You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind. This is the great and first commandment. And a second is like it, You shall love your neighbor as yourself. On these two commandments depend all the law and the prophets.’ {Matthew 22.36-40} - ‘Owe no man anything, but to love one another: for he that loveth another hath fulfilled the law. For this, Thou shalt not commit adultery, Thou shalt not kill, Thou shalt not steal, Thou shalt not bear false witness, Thou shalt not covet; and if there be any other commandment, it is briefly comprehended in this saying, namely, Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself. Love worketh no ill to his neighbor: therefore love is the fulfilling of the law’ {Romans 13:8-10} - ‘For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.’ {Galatians 5:14} - ‘So in everything, do to others what you would have them do to you, for this sums up the Law and the Prophets.’ {Bible, version unknown.} - ‘Therefore all things whatsoever ye would that men should do to you, do ye even so to them.’ {Matthew 7:12} - ‘...and don't do what you hate...’ {Gospel of Thomas 6} --- CONFUCIANISM: - ‘Do not do to others what you would not like yourself. Then there will be no resentment against you, either in the family or in the state.’ {Analects 12:2} - ‘Do not unto others what you would not have them do unto you.’ {Analects 15:23} - ‘One word which sums up the basis for all good conduct…loving kindness. Do not do unto others what you would not want done to yourself.’ {Analects of Confucius 15.23} - Tse-kung asked, ‘Is there one word that can serve as a principle of conduct for life?’ Confucius replied, ‘It is the word 'shu' - reciprocity.’ {Analects 15.23 or} - ‘Tse-kung asked, 'Is there one word that can serve as a principle of conduct for life?' Confucius replied, 'It is the word 'shu' - reciprocity. Do not impose on others what you yourself do not desire.'‘ {Doctrine of the Mean 13.3} - ‘Do not impose on others what you yourself do not desire.’ {Doctrine of the Mean 13.3} - ‘One should not behave towards others in a way which is disagreeable to oneself.’ {Mencius Vii.A.4} - ‘When one cultivates to the utmost the principles of his nature, and exercises them on the principle of reciprocity, he is not far from the path. What you do not like when done to yourself, do not do to others.’ {Li Ki 28.1.32} - ‘What a man dislikes in his superiors, let him not display in the treatment of his inferiors; what he dislikes in inferiors, let him not display in the service of his superiors; what he hates in those who are before him, let him not therewith precede those who are behind him; what he hates in those who are behind him, let him not therewith follow those who are before him; what he hates to receive on the right, let him not bestow on the left; what he hates to receive on the left, let him not bestow on the right: - this is what is called ‘The principle with which, as with a measuring-square, to regulate one's conduct.’ {The Great Learning 10.2} - ‘Try your best to treat others as you would wish to be treated yourself, and you will find that this is the shortest way to benevolence.’ {Mencius VII.A.4} --- HINDUISM: - ‘This is the sum of duty; do naught onto others what you would not have them do unto you.’ {Mahabharata} - ‘Wound not others, do no one injury by thought or deed, utter no word to pain thy fellow creatures.’ {The Ordinances of Manu} - ‘One should not behave towards others in a way which is disagreeable to oneself. This is the essence of morality. All other activities are due to selfish desire.’ {Mahabharata, Anusasana Parva 113.8} - ‘Do naught to others which, if done to thee, would cause thee pain: this is the sum of duty.’ {Mahabharata, 5.1517 or} - ‘This is the sum of duty: Do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.’ {Mahabharata, 5:1517 or} - ‘This is the sum of the Dharma [duty]: do naught unto others which would cause you pain if done to you.’ {Mahabharata 5:1517} - ‘The true rule of life is to guard and do by the things of others as they do by their own.’ {Hindu – unattributed} --- ISLAM [an adherent of Islam is known as a Muslim also spelled Moslem]: - ‘Not one of you truly believes until you wish for others that which you wish for yourself.’ {The Prophet Mohammed Hadith} - ‘No one of you is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself.’ {Sunnah Islam or} - ‘Not one of you is a believer until he desires for his brother that which he desires for himself.’ {Number 13 of Imam} - ‘Al-Nawawi's Forty Hadiths.’ or ‘None of you [truly] believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.’ {Number 13 of Imam ‘Al-Nawawi's Forty Hadiths’} - ‘Let none of you treat his brother in a way he himself would not like to be treated.’ {Islam - unattributed} --- JAINISM: - ‘In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.’ {Lord Mahavir 24th Tirthankara} - ‘In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self’ Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara - ‘One who you think should be hit is none else but you. One who you think should be governed is none else but you. One who you think should be tortured is none else but you. One who you think should be enslaved is none else but you. One who you think should be killed is none else but you. A sage is ingenuous and leads his life after comprehending the parity of the killed and the killer. Therefore, neither does he cause violence to others nor does he make others do so.’ {Acarangasutra 5.101-2} - ‘Therefore, neither does he [a sage] cause violence to others nor does he make others do so.’ Acarangasutra 5.101-2. - ‘One should treat all beings as he himself would be treated.’ {Agamas Sutrakritanga 1.10.13} - ‘A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.’ {Agamas Sutrakritanga 1.11.33} --- JUDAISM: - ‘You shall not take vengeance, nor bear any grudge against the children of your people, but you shall love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD.’ {YHWH, Leviticus 19:18} - ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ {Leviticus 19.18} ‘Take heed to thyself, my child, in all thy works; and be discreet in all thy behavior. And what thou thyself hatest, do to no man.’ {Tobit 4.14-15} - ‘Whatsoever thou wouldest that men should not do unto thee, do not do that to them.’ {Talmud, Shabbat 31a or} - ‘A certain heathen came to Shammai and said to him, ‘Make me a proselyte, on condition that you teach me the whole Torah while I stand on one foot.’ Thereupon he repulsed him with the rod which was in his hand. When he went to Hillel, he said to him, ‘What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbor: that is the whole Torah; all the rest of it is commentary; go and learn.’ {Talmud, Shabbat 31a or} - ‘What is hateful to you, do not to your fellow man. That is the entire law: all the rest is commentary.’ {Talmud, Shabbat 31a or} - ‘What is hateful to you do not do to your neighbour. This is the whole torah [Law]; all the rest is commentary.’ {Hillel Talmud, Shabbat 31a} - ‘...thou shalt love thy neighbor as thyself.’ {Leviticus 19:18 or} - ‘Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against one of your people, but love your neighbour as yourself.’ {Bible, The New International Version, Leviticus 19:18} --- LATTER-DAY SAINTS [Also known as Mormonism]: - ‘And let every man esteem his brother as himself, and practice virtue and holiness before me.’ {Doctrine and Covenants 38:24} --- QUAKERISM: - ‘Oh, do as you would be done by. And do unto all men as you would have them do unto you, for this is but the law and the prophet.’ {Postscript to the Quaker peace testimony, signed by George Fox} --- SHINTOISM: - ‘Be charitable to all beings, love is the representative of God.’ {Ko-ji-ki Hachiman Kasuga} - ‘The heart of the person before you is a mirror. See there your own form’ --- SIKHISM: - ‘No one is my enemy, none a stranger and everyone is my friend.’ {Guru Arjan Dev} - ‘Do not create enmity with anyone as God is within everyone.’ {Guru Arjan Devji 259. Guru Granth Sahib} - ‘We obtain salvation by loving our fellow man and God.’ {Granth Japji} - ‘Compassion-mercy and religion are the support of the entire world’. {Japji Sahib} - ‘Don't create enmity with anyone as God is within everyone.’ {Guru Arjan Devji 259} --- SUFISM [defined by its adherents as the inner, mystical dimension of Islam]: _ ‘The basis of Sufism is consideration of the hearts and feelings of others. If you haven't the will to gladden someone's heart, then at least beware lest you hurt someone's heart, for on our path, no sin exists but this.’ {Dr. Javad Nurbakhsh, Master of the Nimatullahi Sufi Order} --- TAOISM: - ‘Regard your neighbor's gain as your gain, and your neighbor's loss as your own loss.’ {Tai Shang Kan Yin P'ien} - ‘Recompense injury with kindness.’ ‘To those who are good to me, I am good; to those who are not good to me, I am also good. Thus all get to be good. To those who are sincere with me, I am sincere; to those who are not sincere with me, I am also sincere. Thus all get to be sincere.’ - ‘The sage has no interest of his own, but takes the interests of the people as his own. He is kind to the kind; he is also kind to the unkind: for Virtue is kind. He is faithful to the faithful; he is also faithful to the unfaithful: for Virtue is faithful.’ {Tao Teh Ching, Chapter 49} - ‘Regard your neighbor's gain as your own gain, and your neighbor's loss as your own loss.’ {T'ai Shang Kan Ying P'ien} --- UNITARIANISM: - ‘We affirm and promote respect for the interdependent of all existence of which we are a part.’ {Unitarian principles} --- ZOROASTRIANISM: - ‘That nature alone is good which refrains from doing to another whatsoever is not good for itself.’ {Dadisten-I-dinik, 94,5} - ‘Whatever thou dost not approve for thyself, do not approve for anyone else. When thou hast acted in this manner, thou art righteous.’ - ‘That nature only is good when it shall not do unto another whatever is not good for its own self.’ {Avesta: Dadistan-i-dink 94:5} - ‘When a good man is beaten through malice, the effort of every one should continue just as though it happened to himself.’ - ‘Whatever is disagreeable to yourself do not do unto others.’ {Shayast-na-Shayast 13:29} - ‘Comparing oneself to others in such terms as Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I, he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.’ === BELIEF SYSTEMS=== --- AFRICAN: - ‘One going to take a pointed stick to pinch a baby bird should first try it on himself to feel how it hurts.’ {Yoruba Proverb African Traditional (Nigeria)} --- EGYPTIAN [ANTIQUITY]: - ‘Do for one who may do for you, that you may cause him thus to do.’ {The Tale of the Eloquent Peasant 109 – 110. Translated by R.B. Parkinson. The original dates to 1970 BCE to 1640 BCE and may be the earliest version ever written of the Golden Rule} --- GREEK [ANTIQUITY]: - ‘Do not do to others that which would anger you if others did it to you.’ {Socrates} - ‘May I do to others as I would that they should do unto me’ {Plato} - ‘We should behave to friends as we would wish friends to behave to us.’ {Aristotle} - ‘What you would avoid suffering yourself, seek not to impose upon others.’ {Epictetus} - ‘It is impossible to live a pleasant life without living wisely and well and justly (agreeing 'neither to harm nor be harmed'), and it is impossible to live wisely and well and justly without living a pleasant life.’ – {Epicurus} - ‘Do not to your neighbor what you would take ill from him.’ {Pittacus} ‘Avoid doing what you would blame others for doing.’ {Thales} - ‘What you do not want to happen to you, do not do it yourself either.’ {Sextus, the Pythagorean.} - ‘Do not do to others what would anger you if done to you by others.’ {Isocrates} - ‘Do not that to a neighbor which you shall take ill from him.’ {Ancient Greek - unattributed} --- HUMANISM: - ‘Treat other people as you'd want to be treated in their situation; don't do things you wouldn't want to have done to you.’ {British Humanist Association} - ‘Humanists acknowledge human interdependence, the need for mutual respect and the kinship of all humanity. Humanists affirm that individual and social problems can only be resolved by means of human reason, intelligent effort, critical thinking joined with compassion and a spirit of empathy for all living beings.’ --- LIBERTARIAN: - ‘The non-aggression principle (also called the non-aggression axiom, the anti-coercion principle, the zero aggression principle, the non-initiation of force, ZAP, or NAP) is a moral stance which asserts that aggression is inherently illegitimate. Aggression, for the purposes of the NAP, is defined as the initiation or threatening of violence against a person or legitimately owned property of another. Specifically, any unsolicited actions of others that physically affect an individual’s property or person (which may also be considered that person's property), no matter if the result of those actions is damaging, beneficial, or neutral to the owner, are considered violent or aggressive when they are against the owner’s free will and interfere with his right to self-determination or the principle of self-ownership. Supporters of NAP often use it to demonstrate the immorality of theft, vandalism, assault, and fraud. In contrast to pacifism, the non-aggression principle does not preclude violence used in self-defense or defense of others.’ {Wikipedia.org} - ‘The harm principle holds that the actions of individuals should only be limited to prevent harm to other individuals. John Stuart Mill articulated this principle in ‘On Liberty’, where he argued that ‘the only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others.’ An equivalent was earlier stated in France's ‘Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen’ of 1789 as ‘Liberty consists in the freedom to do everything which injures no one else; hence the exercise of the natural rights of each man has no limits except those which assure to the other members of the society the enjoyment of the same rights.’ {Wikipedia.org} - Historical formulations of the non-aggression principle: ‘Natural justice is a symbol or expression of usefullness, to prevent one person from harming or being harmed by another.’ {300's BC – Epicurus}; ‘Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.’ {20's - 30's AD - Jesus Christ}; ‘Among the absolute duties, i.e., of anybody to anybody, the first place belongs to this one: let no one injure another. For this is the broadest of all duties, embracing all men as such.’ {1682 - Samuel von Pufendorf, in ‘On the Duty of Man and Citizen’.}; ‘Being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions.’ {1689 - John Locke, in ‘Second Treatise on Government’.}; ‘No man can have a right to begin to interrupt the happiness of another.’ This formulation emphasized ‘begin’ to distinguish aggressive disturbances from those in self-defense (‘...yet every man has a right to defend himself and his against violence, to recover what is taken by force from him, and even to make reprisals, by all the means that truth and prudence permit.’) {1722 - William Wollaston, in ‘The Religion of Nature Delineated’.}; ‘The birthright of man ... is such a degree of liberty, civil and religious, as is compatible with the liberty of every other individual with whom he is united in a social compact, and the continued existence of that compact.’ {1790 - Mary Wollstonecraft, in ‘A Vindication of the Rights of Men’.}; ‘Rightful liberty is unobstructed action according to our will within limits drawn around us by the equal rights of others. I do not add 'within the limits of the law', because law is often but the tyrant's will, and always so when it violates the rights of the individual.’ and ‘No man has a natural right to commit aggression on the equal rights of another, and this is all from which the laws ought to restrain him.’ (Thomas Jefferson to Francis Gilmer, 1816); ‘Every man is free to do that which he wills, provided he infringes not the equal freedom of any other man.’ {1851 - Herbert Spencer. This is known as the law of equal freedom. This notion of equal freedom goes back to earlier liberal thought.} ‘The only purpose for which power can be rightfully exercised over any member of a civilized community, against his will, is to prevent harm to others’. {1859 - John Stuart Mill, in ‘On Liberty’, where he formulated this concept called the harm principle.}; ‘The precondition of a civilized society is the barring of physical force from social relationships. ... In a civilized society, force may be used only in retaliation and only against those who initiate its use.’ {1961 - Ayn Rand, in an essay called ‘Man's Rights’ in the book ‘The Virtue of Selfishness’.}; ‘No one may threaten or commit violence ('aggress') against another man's person or property. Violence may be employed only against the man who commits such violence; that is, only defensively against the aggressive violence of another. In short, no violence may be employed against a non-aggressor. Here is the fundamental rule from which can be deduced the entire corpus of libertarian theory.’ {1963 - Murray Rothbard, in ‘War, Peace, and the State’ (1963) which appeared in ‘Egalitarianism as a Revolt Against Nature and Other Essays’.} --- NATIVE AMERICAN: - ‘Respect for all life is the foundation.’ {The Great Law of Peace} - ‘All things are our relatives; what we do to everything, we do to ourselves. All is really One.’ {Black Elk} - ‘We are as much alive as we keep the earth alive.’ {Chief Dan George} - ‘The Spider Grandmother gave two rules: Don't go around hurting people, and Try to understand things.’ {Capo 2nd Hopi Indian culture} - ‘Do not wrong or hate your neighbor. For it is not he who you wrong, but yourself.’ {Pima proverb} - ‘Treat all men alike. Give them all the same law. Give them all an even chance to live and grow.’ {Chief Joseph, Nez Perce} - ‘Our fathers gave us many laws, which they had learned from their fathers. These laws were good. They told us to treat all men as they treated us; that we should never be the first to break a bargain; that it was a disgrace to tell a lie; that we should speak only the truth…’ {Chief Joseph, Nez Perce} --- PERSIAN [ANTIQUITY]: - ‘Do as you would be done by.’ --- ROMAN [ANTIQUITY]: - ‘Treat your inferiors as you would be treated by your superiors.’ {Seneca: Epistle 47:11} - ‘The law imprinted on the hearts of all men is to love the members of society as themselves.’ {Roman Pagan Religion} --- SCIENTOLOGY: - ‘Thus today we have two golden rules for happiness: 1. Be able to experience anything; and 2. Cause only those things which others are able to experience easily.’ {‘Scientology: A New Slant on Life, Two Rules for Happy Living’} --- UTILITARIANISM: - ‘To do as one would be done by, and to love one's neighbor as one's self, constitute the ideal perfection of utilitarian morality.’ {John Stuart Mills} --- WICCA: - ‘An' it harm no one, do what thou wilt’ (i.e. do whatever you want to, as long as it harms nobody, including yourself). {The Wiccan Rede Writers} - ‘Here ye these words and heed them well, the words of Dea, thy Mother Goddess, ‘I command thee thus, O children of the Earth, that that which ye deem harmful unto thyself, the very same shall ye be forbidden from doing unto another, for violence and hatred give rise to the same. My command is thus, that ye shall return all violence and hatred with peacefulness and love, for my Law is love unto all things. Only through love shall ye have peace; yea and verily, only peace and love will cure the world, and subdue all evil.’ {Codex Vias, Part Two} --- OTHER: - ‘We must treat others as we wish others to treat us’ {The ‘Declaration Toward a Global Ethic’ from the Parliament of the World’s Religions (1993) proclaimed the Golden Rule (‘We must treat others as we wish others to treat us’) as the common principle for many religions. The Initial Declaration was signed by 143 respected leaders from all of the world's major faiths, including Baha'i Faith, Brahmanism, Brahma Kumaris, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Indigenous, Interfaith, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Native American, Neo-Pagan, Sikhism, Taoism, Theosophist, Unitarian Universalist and Zoroastrian.} - ‘So act that your principle of action might safely be made a law for the whole world.’ [A morality he called The Principle of Universality.]’ {Immanuel Kant} - ‘Every man takes care that his neighbor does not cheat him. But the day comes when he begins to care that he does not cheat his neighbor. Then all goes well.’ {Ralph Waldo Emerson} - ‘One should be ‘contented with so much liberty against other men, as he would allow against himself.’ {Thomas Hobbes} - ‘You should always ask yourself what would happen if everyone did what you are doing.’ {Jean-Paul Sartre} - ‘It is a very high goal: free and responsible development of the individual, so that he may place his powers freely and gladly in the service of mankind.’ {Albert Einstein} - ‘Neighbors' willingness to act, when needed, for one another's benefit, and particularly for the benefit of one another's children.’ {Dr. Felton Earls, professor of human behavior & development, Harvard School of Public Health} - ‘I am Thou Thou are I He is ours We both are His So may all be for our neighbor. Only he can be just who is able to put himself in the position of others. Only he who can take care of what belongs to others may have his own. Treat Another's as your own and be ye so related. ‘The highest aim and sense of human life is the striving to attain the welfare of one's neighbor,’ and that this is possible exclusively only by the conscious renunciation of one's own.’ {G.I. Gurdjieff} - ‘Look into your own heart, discover what it is that gives you pain and then refuse, under any circumstance whatsoever, to inflict that pain on anybody else.’ {Karen Armstrong} - ‘The Golden Rule would reconcile capital and labor, all political contention and uproar, all selfishness and greed.’ {Joseph Parker} - ‘We have committed the golden rule to memory; let us now commit it to life.’ {Edwin Markham} ‘You reap what you sow.’ [Also known as the principle of Karma.] {Proverb} - ‘Tit for tat’. [Some early incarnations of the Golden Rule, were found in Ancient Babylon in the Code of Hammurabi, (1780 BCE), which dealt with ethical reciprocity in ways, such as by limiting retribution and treatment of others to only that which was equal and equitable. For example, ‘an eye for an eye, a tooth for a tooth’.] {Saying} - ‘A double standard [also known as hypocrisy] is the application of different sets of principles for similar situations, or to different people in the same situation [so there is no reciprocity].’ {dictionary.com} === FOLKLORE === [… in the form of ‘the long spoons allegory’ in the cultures of BUDDHISTS, CHRISTIANS, HINDUS, JEWS and ORIENTALS:] Rabbi Haim of Romshishok was an itinerant preacher. He traveled from town to town delivering religious sermons that stressed the importance of respect for one’s fellow man. He often began his talks with the following story: ‘I once ascended to the firmaments. I first went to see Hell and the sight was horrifying. Row after row of tables were laden with platters of sumptuous food, yet the people seated around the tables were pale and emaciated, moaning in hunger. As I came closer, I understood their predicament. Every person held a full spoon, but both arms were splinted with wooden slats so he could not bend either elbow to bring the food to his mouth. It broke my heart to hear the tortured groans of these poor people as they held their food so near but could not consume it. Next I went to visit Heaven. I was surprised to see the same setting I had witnessed in Hell – row after row of long tables laden with food. But in contrast to Hell, the people here in Heaven were sitting contentedly talking with each other, obviously sated from their sumptuous meal. As I came closer, I was amazed to discover that here, too, each person had his arms splinted on wooden slats that prevented him from bending his elbows. How, then, did they manage to eat? As I watched, a man picked up his spoon and dug it into the dish before him. Then he stretched across the table and fed the person across from him! The recipient of this kindness thanked him and returned the favor by leaning across the table to feed his benefactor. I suddenly understood. Heaven and Hell offer the same circumstances and conditions. The critical difference is in the way the people treat each other. I ran back to Hell to share this solution with the poor souls trapped there. I whispered in the ear of one starving man, ‘You do not have to go hungry. Use your spoon to feed your neighbor, and he will surely return the favor and feed you.’ 'You expect me to feed the detestable man sitting across the table?' said the man angrily. 'I would rather starve than give him the pleasure of eating!' I then understood God’s wisdom in choosing who is worthy to go to Heaven and who deserves to go to Hell.’ {Rabbi, Haim. ‘Narrative of the allegory’} [Also described in a similar fashion in Lord, Shiva. ‘Hindu parable: A Long Handled Spoon’, Horn, Nils. ‘Yoga Basic Knowledge and Exercises’, pp. 30, Peseschkian, Nossrat (1986). ‘Oriental stories as tools in psychotherapy’. Springer-Verlag. pp. 26, Tietze, Harald W. ‘Happyology’. The Pope tells the story of the long spoons. pp. 61, Swami, Vinod (1992). ‘Conflict Mediation Across Cultures’.]" - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
Ideas and quotes collected from the following websites: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Golden_rule , http://www.teachingvalues.com/goldenrule.html , http://www.unification.net/ws/theme015.htm http://www.humanreligions.info/golden.html , http://www.goldenruleproject.org/HTML/more_formulations.htm , http://www.humanismforschools.org.uk/pdfs/the%20golden%20rule.pdf , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Non-aggression_principle , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harm_Principle , http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Allegory_of_the_long_spoons , http://www.goldenrule4everyone.com/
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