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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.52770] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about morality, ethics, 'The Golden Rule' and reciprocity.]

'Nobility'

...

For good lieth not in pursuing,
Nor gaining of great nor of small,
But just in the doing, and doing
As we would be done by, is all.

...

" - Alice Cary
(1820-1871), American poet, whose poetry was admired by Edgar Allen Poe, a leading American author, poet and literary critic.
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[Quote No.52781] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: sometimes published in newspapers January 1st as a New Year's motto]

'The World Needs'

A little more kindness and a little less creed,
A little more giving and a little less greed;
A little more smile and a little less frown,
A little less kicking a man when he's down;
A little more 'we' and a little less 'I,'
A little more laugh and a little less cry;
A few more flowers on the pathway of life,
And fewer on graves at the end of the strife.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.52803] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about helping others, being of service and making a contribution however small]

'Your Mission'

If you cannot on the ocean,
Sail among the swiftest fleet,
Rocking on the highest billows,
Laughing at the storms you meet,

You can stand among the sailors,
Anchored yet within the bay;
You can lend a hand to help them,
As they launch their boats away

If you are too week to journey
Up the mountain, steep and high,
You can stand within the valley,
While the multitude go by.

You can chant in happy measure,
As they slowly pass along;
Though they may forget the singer,
They will not forget the song.

If you have not gold and silver
Ever ready to command,
If you cannot toward the needy
Reach an ever-open hand,

You can visit the afflicted,
O'er the erring you can weep;
You can be a true disciple,
Sitting at the Savior's feet.

If you cannot in a conflict
Prove yourself a soldier true,
If where the fire and smoke are thickest
There's no work for you to do,

When the battle field is silent,
You can go with careful tread;
You can bear away the wounded,
You can cover up the dead.

Do not stand then idly waiting
For some greater work to do;
Fortune is a lazy goddess,
She will never come to you.

Go and toil in any vineyard
Do not fear to do or dare;
If you want a field of labor,
You can find it anywhere.

" - Ellen M. Huntington Gates
(1835 - 1920), writer and poet. [refer http://reelyredd.com/web/index.php?option=com_flexicontent&view=items&id=129:ellen-mh-gates-whos-who-poet ] Ellen M. Huntington Gates
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[Quote No.52829] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:]

'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired')

...

...be at peace with God, whatever you conceive Him to be, and whatever your labors and aspirations, in the noisy confusion of life keep peace with your soul...

" - Max Ehrmann
(1872 – 1945) American writer, poet, and attorney from Terre Haute, Indiana, widely known for his 1927 prose poem 'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired'). He often wrote on spiritual themes. [In 1956, the Reverend Frederick Kates, rector of Saint Paul's Church in Baltimore, Maryland, included 'Desiderata' in a compilation of devotional materials for his congregation. The compilation included the church's foundation date: 'Old Saint Paul's Church, Baltimore A.D. 1692'. Consequently, the date of the text's authorship was (and still is) widely mistaken as 1692, the year of the church's foundation. Refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desiderata ]
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[Quote No.52889] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about the strange theory of reciprocity - 'What you give, you get' and the equally strange theory of expectation as perception - 'What you look for, you see'.]

'The Right Kind of People'

Gone is the city, gone the day,
Yet still the story and the meaning stay:
Once where a prophet in the palm shade basked
A traveler chanced at noon to rest his mules.
‘What sort of people may they be,’ he asked,
‘In this proud city on the plains o’erspread?’
‘Well, friend, what sort of people whence you came?’
‘What sort?’ the packman scowled; ‘why, knaves and fools.’
‘You’ll find the people here the same,’ the wise man said.

Another stranger in the dusk drew near,
And pausing, cried, ‘What sort of people here
In your bright city where yon towers arise?’
‘Well, friend, what sort of people whence you came?’
‘What sort?’ the pilgrim smiled with lifted head;
‘Good, true, and wise.’
‘You’ll find the people here the same,’
The wise man said.

" - Edwin Markham
(1852-1940)
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[Quote No.52893] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about government, laws, constitution and rights]

'The Ship of State'

Sail on, sail on, O Ship of State!
Sail on, O Union, strong and great!
Humanity, with all its fears,
With all the hopes of future years,
Is hanging breathless on thy fate!
We know what Master laid thy keel,
What Workmen wrought thy ribs of steel,
Who made each mast, and sail, and rope;
What anvils rang, what hammers beat,
In what a forge and what a heat
Were forged the anchors of thy hope!
Fear not each sudden sound and shock -
'Tis of the wave, and not the rock;
'Tis but the flapping of the sail,
And not a rent made by the gale!
In spite of rock, and tempest roar,
In spite of false lights on the shore,
Sail on, nor fear to breast the sea!
Our hearts, our hopes, are all with thee.
Our hearts, our hopes, our prayers, our tears,
Our faith, triumphant o'er our fears,
Are all with thee, are all with thee!

" - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow
(1807 - 1882) American poet
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[Quote No.52898] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about leniency and forgiveness]

The quality of mercy is not strain'd;
It droppeth as the gentle rain from Heaven
Upon the place beneath: it is twice bless'd;
It blesseth him that gives, and him that takes:

" - William Shakespeare
(1564-1616), playwright. A quatrain from his play, 'The Merchant of Venice'.
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[Quote No.52936] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about kindness]

'Seeds Of Kindness'

Every seed of kindness
That you plant today
Will one day
Be a bouquet
That they'll lay
Upon your grave
For no one is loved
For the money that they've made
No one is remembered
For the people they've betrayed
It is your thoughtfulness
And kindness
That will live
When you are gone

" - Annabel Cruz
[http://www.poemhunter.com/poem/seeds-of-kindness/ ]
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[Quote No.52948] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the dangers of getting too familiar with immorality and evil, lest you lose your disgust, become intrigued and succumb to temptation, degradation and eventual self-destruction.]

'An Essay on Man: Epistle II'

...

Vice is a monster of so frightful mien,
As, to be hated, needs but to be seen;
Yet seen too oft, familiar with her face,
We first endure, then pity, then embrace.

...

" - Alexander Pope
(1688–1744), English poet
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[Quote No.52955] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: ethics, morality, the 'Golden Rule' and reciprocity - 'life's a boomerang', 'what you usually give you usually get' and 'what goes around, comes around':]

'Life's Mirror'

There are loyal hearts, there are spirits brave,
There are souls that are pure and true,
Then give the world the best you have,
And the best will come back to you.

Give love, and love to your life will flow,
A strength in your utmost need,
Have faith, and a score of hearts will show
Their faith in your word and deed.

Give truth, and your gift will be paid in kind;
And honor will honor meet;
And a smile that is sweet will surely find
A smile that is just as sweet.

Give pity and sorrow to those who mourn,
You will gather in flowers again
The scattered seeds from your thoughts outborne
Though the sowing seemed but vain.

For life is the mirror of king and slave,
'Tis just what we are and do;
Then give to the world the best you have,
And the best will come back to you.

" - Madeline Bridges
(1844 - 1920), pseudonym of Mary Ainge de Vere, American poet.
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[Quote No.52958] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about making the most of your life for the good of all]

'How Do You Live Your Dash?'

I read of a man who stood to speak
At the funeral of a friend.
He referred to the dates on her tombstone,
From the beginning... to the end.

He noted that first came her date of birth
And spoke the following date with tears,
But he said what mattered most of all
Was the dash between those years.

For that dash represents all the time
That she spent alive on earth...
And now only those who loved her
Know what that little line is worth.

For it matters not, how much we own;
The cars...the house...the cash,
What matters is how we live and love
And how we spend our dash.

So think about this long and hard...
Are there things you'd like to change?
For you never know how much time is left,
That can still be rearranged.

If we could just slow down enough
To consider what's true and real,
And always try to understand
The way other people feel.

And be less quick to anger,
And show appreciation more
And love the people in our lives
Like we've never loved before.

If we treat each other with respect,
And more often wear a smile...
Remembering that this special dash
Might only last a little while.

So, when your eulogy's being read
With your lifes actions to rehash...
Would you be proud of the things they say
About how you spent your dash?....

" - Linda Ellis
http://www.linda-ellis.com/
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[Quote No.52974] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about daily kindness, service and trying to make the world even just a little better because of our presence.]

'Morning Prayer'

Let me to-day do something that shall take
A little sadness from the world's vast store,
And may I be so favored as to make
Of joy's too scanty sum a little more.
Let me not hurt, by any selfish deed
Or thoughtless word, the heart of foe or friend;
Nor would I pass, unseeing, worthy need,
Or sin by silence when I should defend.
However meager be my worldly wealth
Let me give something that shall aid my kind,
A word of courage, or a thought of health,
Dropped as I pass for troubled hearts to find.
Let me to-night look back across the span
'Twixt dawn and dark, and to my conscience say --
Because of some good act to beast or man --
'The world is better that I lived to-day.'

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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[Quote No.52984] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:]

Give little bits of kindness,
So we leave joy behind us.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.52995] Need Area: Friends > General
"'Peace Prayer of St. Francis of Assisi'

Lord, make me an instrument of your peace,
Where there is hatred, let me sow love;
where there is injury, pardon;
where there is doubt, faith;
where there is despair, hope;
where there is darkness, light;
where there is sadness, joy;

O Divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek to be consoled as to console;
to be understood as to understand;
to be loved as to love.

For it is in giving that we receive;
it is in pardoning that we are pardoned;
and it is in dying that we are born to eternal life.

" - St. Francis of Assisi

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[Quote No.53000] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about the benefits of ethics, morality, the 'Golden Rule' (treating others as you'd like to be treated in their situation = reciprocity), service, kindness and charity to all concerned]

'The Beggar'

The Day was one of weariness
With no bright interlude;
I was fatigued by homely tasks
Bereft of fortitude.

Night's shadows brought a deeper gloom
And when a sudden knock
Upon the door came startling me,
Trembling, I turned the lock.

There stood a tired, dejected man
Who humbly asked for bread,
And in his countenance there was
No thing to fear or dread.

For meekness and humility
Were stamped upon his face
As though some sorrow's heavy weight
Had passed and left its trace.

Forgetting care, I turned to fetch
A plate of meat and bread;
By serving him somehow my heart
Was strangely comforted.

And evil tales of vagrant folk
All vanished when he said:
'I thank you for this kindly act,'
Then bowed and trudged ahead...

Did he know that I too had begged
But not for earthly bread
That when I gave him food and drink
My spirit had been fed?

" - Margaret E. Bruner

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[Quote No.53001] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about how the world has in it both unspeakable, unadulterated hate and ineffable, pure love.]

'The Hate and the Love of the World'

I have seen men binding their brothers in chains, and crafty traders reaching for the bread that women and children lifted to their mouths;
I have seen suffering go unaided.
I have heard the iron din of war, and have seen the waxen face of early death;
And I have cried in my heart, 'The world is hate!'

I have heard birds calling their mates in the still forests, and insects chirping to their loves in the tangled grass of meadows;
I have seen mothers caressing their babes, and aged men supporting with devotion the slow steps of stooping women;
I have seen cheerful hearthstones surrounded by laughing children and strong men and happy women;
I have heard the tender words of lovers in the pure passion of youth;
And I have cried in my heart, 'The world is love!'

" - Max Ehrmann

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[Quote No.53018] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about social ethics, morality and 'The Golden Rule' of only doing to others what you would want them to do to you in the same situation]

'Our Saviour's Golden Rule'

Be you to others Kind and True,
As you'd have others be to you.
And neither do nor say to Men
Whate'er you would not take again.

" - Isaac Watts
(1674 – 1748) English hymn-writer, theologian and logician. [Refer Bible: Matthew 7. 12.]
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[Quote No.53031] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about people's differing ideals, values, goals, desires, greatest happiness, etc.]

'Ideals'

Some men deem
Gold their god, and some esteem
Honor is the chief content
That to man in life is lent;
And some others do contend,
Quite none like to a friend;
Others hold there is no wealth
Compared to a perfect health;
Some man's mind in quiet stands
When he is lord of many lands:
But I did sigh, and said all this
Was but a shade of perfect bliss;
And in my thoughts I did approve
Naught so sweet as is true love.

" - Robert Greene

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[Quote No.53038] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about appropriately celebrating a proponent of 'The Golden Rule' of treating others as you would like to be treated in their situation]

'A Poem for Christmas'

If Christmas brought me nothing more,
Than a cozy chair by the open fire,
With the children playing upon the floor,
And I with a book and a well filled briar,
Or a friend or two, just to chat awhile,
And watch the little folks at play,
Recalling, too, with a tender smile,
The joys of a bygone Christmas Day;
If I had nothing more than this,
'Twould be a day of peaceful bliss.

But Christmas joys spring not alone
From selfish comforts such as these,
And man can scarce enjoy his own,
Till he has done his best to ease
The grief and pain that, everywhere,
Abides among us, so today,
My book and pipe and easy chair,
Must wait till in my humble way,
I do the things I find to do,
To make folks happy round about,
And do them all so quiet too,
That other folks won't find it out.
Enough, I think, to more than fill
Most any soul with God's Good Will.

" - C. A. Snodgrass

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[Quote No.53041] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about abundance, sharing, charity, empathy, generosity, ethics, 'The Golden Rule' (of treating others as you would want to be treated), reciprocity and gratitude]

'Because I Have Been Given Much'

Because I have been given much, I too must give.
Because of thy great bounty, Lord, each day I live
I shall divide my gifts from thee
With every brother that I see
Who has the need of help from me.
Because I have been sheltered, fed by thy good care,
I cannot see another's lack and I not share
My glowing fire, my loaf of bread,
My roof's safe shelter overhead,
That he too might be comforted.
Because I have been blessed by thy great love, dear Lord,
I'll share thy love again, according to thy word.
I shall give love to those in need.
I'll show that love by word and deed.
Thus shall my thanks be thanks indeed.

" - Grace Noll Crowell

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[Quote No.53057] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the value of 'negative-bad' as well as 'positive-good' experiences for there are advantages in adversities, blessings in burdens, lessons in laments, positives in problems, etc! For example; we learn patience; we learn to be grateful for the good things without taking them for granted and; we also learn to relate and be compassionate to those who are suffering!!]

'The Joy of Incompleteness'

If all our life were one broad glare
Of sunlight clear, unclouded:
If all our path were smooth and fair,
By no soft gloom enshrouded;
If all life's flowers were fully blown
Without the sweet unfolding,
And happiness were rudely thrown
On hands too weak for holding --
Should we not miss the twilight hours,
The gentle haze and sadness?
Should we not long for storms and showers
To break the constant gladness?

If none were sick and none were sad,
What service could we render?
I think if we were always glad
We scarcely could be tender.
Did our beloved never need
Our patient ministration,
Earth would grow cold and miss indeed
Its sweetest consolation:
If sorrow never claimed our heart
And every wish were granted
Patience would die, and hope depart --
Life would be disenchanted.

" - Albert Crowell

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[Quote No.53090] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about empathy and kindness]

'A Prayer For Every Day'

Make me too brave to lie or be unkind.
Make me too understanding, too, to mind
The little hurts companions give, and friends,
The careless hurts that no one quite intends.
Make me too thoughtful to hurt others so.
Help me to know
The inmost hearts of those for whom I care,
Their secret wishes, all the loads they bear,
That I may add my courage to their own.
May I make lonely folks feel less alone,
And happy ones a little happier yet.
May I forget
What ought to be forgotten; and recall
Unfailing, all
That ought to be recalled, each kindly thing,
Forgetting what might sting.
To all upon my way,
Day after day,
Let me be joy, be hope! Let my life sing!

" - Mary Carolyn Davies
(1888? - 1949?), American poet and dramatist. [Refer http://www.poetryfoundation.org/bio/mary-carolyn-davies and http://www.eflip.com/poetry/ ]
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[Quote No.53101] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about not envying others because you have unique talents that are equally worthy of being valued; for example like oranges and strawberries are both valuable for different reasons.]

'Envy'

This rose-tree is not made to bear
The violet blue, nor lily fair,
Nor the sweet mignionet:
And if this tree were discontent,
Or wished to change its natural bent,
It all in vain would fret.

And should it fret, you would suppose
It ne’er had seen its own red rose,
Nor after gentle shower
Had ever smelled its rose’s scent,
Or it could ne’er be discontent
With its own pretty flower.

Like such a blind and senseless tree
As I’ve imagined this to be,
All envious persons are:
With care and culture all may find
Some pretty flower in their own mind,
Some talent that is rare.

" - Mary Lamb
(1764–1847)
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[Quote No.53130] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about making a contribution to improving future society!]

'The Road Of Masonry'

Men build a road of Masonry
Across the hills and dales,
Unite the prairie and the sea,
The mountains and the vales,
They cross the chasm, bridge the stream,
They point to where the turrets gleam,
And many men for many a day
Who seek the heights shall find the way.

Men build a road of Masonry,
But not for self they build:
With footsteps of humanity
The hearts of men are thrilled.
This music makes their labor sweet:
The endless tramp of other feet,
The thought that men shall travel thus
An easier road because of us.

We build the road of Masonry
With other men in mind;
We do not build for you and me,
We build for all mankind.
We build a road! - remember, men,
Build not for Now, but build for Then,
And other men who walk the way
Shall find the road we built today.

Who builds the road of Masonry,
Though small or great his part,
However hard the task may be,
May toil with singing heart.
For it is something, after all,
When muscles tire and shadows fall,
To know that other men shall bless
The builder for his faithfulness.

" - Douglas Malloch
(1877 – 1938) American poet, short-story writer and Associate Editor of American Lumberman, a trade paper in Chicago.
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[Quote No.53164] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about the mystery of death and the feelings of those left behind]

'Time's Hand Is Kind'

For those who place their blooms on new-made graves
And feel that life holds nought but emptiness,
Know that time's hand in kindness ever saves
The heart from too much sorrow and distress.

Yet all deep wounds heal slowly, it would seem,
But gradually the yearning pain will cease. . . .
Thus will your grief become a hallowed dream
And, in its stead, will come a strange new peace.

" - Margaret E. Bruner

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[Quote No.53168] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about kindness in small as well as big ways]

'Be Kind When You Can'

Be kind when you can, though the kindness be little,
'Tis small letters make up philosophers' scrolls;
The crystal of Happiness, vivid and brittle,
Can seldom be cut into very large bowls.

'Tis atoms that dwell in the measureless mountain,
'Tis moments that sum up the century's flight;
'Tis but drops that unite in Niagara's fountain,
'Tis rays, single rays, from the harvest-sun light.

Stone by stone builds the temple that rises in glory,
Inch by inch grows the child till maturity's prime;
The jewels so famous in bright, Eastern story
Have been nursed, tint by tint, in the blossom of Time.

'Tis grains make the desert-sheet, trackless and spreading;
'Tis but petals that deck every blossom-twinned spray;
There are leaves - only leaves - where the forest is shedding
Its gloom till the density shuts out the day.

A word or a glance which we give 'without thinking',
May shadow or lighten some sensitive breast;
And the draught from the well-spring is wine in the drinking,
If quaffed from the brim that Affection has blest.

Then be kind when you can in the smallest of duties,
Don't wait for the larger expressions of Love;
For the heart depends less for its joys and its beauties
On the flight of the Eagle than coo of the Dove.

" - Eliza Cook
(1818 – 1889) English author, Chartist poet and writer born in London Road, Southwark.
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[Quote No.53191] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about how people need to be cared for and loved all the time to feel their best]

'Need of Lovin''

Folk need a lot of loving in the morning;
The day is all before, with cares beset -
The cares we know, and they that give no warning;
For love is God’s own antidote for fret.

Folk need a heap of loving at the noon-time -
In the battle lull, the moment snatched from strife -
Halfway between the waking and the croon-time,
While bickering and worriment are rife.

Folk hunger so for loving at the night-time,
When wearily they take them home to rest —
At slumber song and turning-out-the-light time -
Of all the times for loving, that’s the best.

Folk want a lot of loving every minute -
The sympathy of others and their smile!
Till life’s end, from the moment they begin it,
Folks need a lot of loving all the while.

" - Strickland Gillilan
(1869–1954) American poet and humourist.
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[Quote No.53192] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about ethics, morality and social values]

'Why Do I Live?'

I live for those who love me,
For those who know me true,
For the heaven that bends above me,
And the good that I can do;
For the wrongs that need resistance,
For the cause that lacks assistance,
For the future in the distance,
And the good that I can do.

" - Thomas Guthrie
(1864–1936) Canadian author, born at Chatham, New Brunswick, and educated at Queen's University, Kingston, where he graduated in 1889. He became a teacher, but he retired in 1901 to devote himself to literature. He was editorial writer of the 'Ottawa Free Press' (1905) and office editor of 'Canada and Its Provinces' (1914–15), a publication in 22 volumes on the history of Canada.
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[Quote No.53197] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about relearning and regaining empathy, sympathy and compassion which links us imaginatively to others and their feelings - especially pain - so we wish to help them as we would want to help ourselves - in accordance with ethics, morality, reciprocity and love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as we would want to be treated in the same situation.]

'Rebirth'

Sometimes we go our way carefree;
No trouble comes to mar
The routine of our lives, and we
Forget there is a scar
Or wound in other lives, till pain
Descends on someone near
To us, and then our hearts regain
Lost kindliness; we hear
With understanding of the woes
Of others — a rebirth
Comes, and we feel for all of those
Who suffer here on earth.

" - Margaret E. Bruner

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[Quote No.53202] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about creating a delay and a distraction between an annoyance and our angry reaction in order to regain desired focus, self-control, self-discipline and calm, thoughtful choice to find a peaceful, wise reaction. Perhaps think of ten of your favourite things you like from the need areas or two from each of the senses, etc]

'Count Ten'

What shall we count to cool our angry pride?
Ten chilly digits standing in a line?
Oh, wiser far to count ten circling stars
That lean upon blue space: they will decline
To lend themselves to bitterness or pain.
Or we might count ten muted leaves that fall
Bearing a freight of somber autumn rain -
Ten leaves that fall, one here, one distantly,
In leisurely submission to the ground.
Or ten flecked pebbles lying in a pool
So hushed by dawn that the air holds no sound
Of water-motion. Or count ten mortal men
Who have come forth by the red gate of birth
To meet the wind . . . to learn the tang of laughter . . .
To wonder . . . and return into the earth.
For having counted, slowly we can lift
Our eyes to look on him who has offended,
Saying, 'How large and strange this life we live . . .
Was I enraged with you? . . . Well, that is ended . . .'

" - Bonaro W. Overstreet
(circa 1903 - 1985), Bonaro Wilkinson Overstreet, American author, poet and psychologist. For more than three decades, Mrs. Overstreet and her husband, Harry A. Overstreet, lectured widely on adult education, mental health, social psychology and political philosophy. Outspoken defenders of civil liberties and academic freedom, they co-wrote many books, including 'The Mind Alive,' and 'Leaders for Adult Education,'. Mrs. Overstreet, wrote several volumes of poetry, and wrote such inspirational books as 'Courage for Crisis' and 'How to Stay Alive All of Your Life.' [refer http://www.nytimes.com/1985/09/11/arts/bonaro-w-overstreet-author-is-dead-at-82.html ]
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[Quote No.53218] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about desires for the world in The New Year]

'Ring Out , Wild Bells'

Ring out, wild bells, to the wild sky,
The flying cloud, the frosty light;
The year is dying in the night;
Ring out, wild bells, and let him die.

Ring out the old, ring in the new,
Ring, happy bells, across the snow:
The year is going, let him go;
Ring out the false, ring in the true.

Ring out the grief that saps the mind,
For those that here we see no more,
Ring out the feud of rich and poor,
Ring in redress to all mankind.

Ring out a slowly dying cause,
And ancient forms of party strife;
Ring in the nobler modes of life,
With sweeter manners, purer laws.

Ring out the want, the care the sin,
The faithless coldness of the times;
Ring out, ring out my mournful rhymes,
But ring the fuller minstrel in.

Ring out false pride in place and blood,
The civic slander and the spite;
Ring in the love of truth and right,
Ring in the common love of good.

Ring out old shapes of foul disease,
Ring out the narrowing lust of gold;
Ring out the thousand wars of old,
Ring in the thousand years of peace.

Ring in the valiant man and free,
The larger heart, the kindlier hand;
Ring out the darkness of the land,
Ring in the Christ that is to be.

" - Alfred Lord Tennyson
(1809 – 1892) Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign. He remains one of the most popular British poets.
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[Quote No.53221] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the stupidity and 'fog of war', unquestioning discipline, blind loyalty, self-sacrifice, bravery and heroism]

'The Charge Of The Light Brigade'

Half a league, half a league,
Half a league onward,
All in the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.
'Forward, the Light Brigade!
Charge for the guns!' he said:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

'Forward, the Light Brigade!'
Was there a man dismay'd ?
Not tho' the soldier knew
Some one had blunder'd:
Their's not to make reply,
Their's not to reason why,
Their's but to do and die:
Into the valley of Death
Rode the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon in front of them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
Boldly they rode and well,
Into the jaws of Death,
Into the mouth of Hell
Rode the six hundred.

Flash'd all their sabres bare,
Flash'd as they turn'd in air
Sabring the gunners there,
Charging an army, while
All the world wonder'd:
Plunged in the battery-smoke
Right thro' the line they broke;
Cossack and Russian
Reel'd from the sabre-stroke
Shatter'd and sunder'd.
Then they rode back, but not
Not the six hundred.

Cannon to right of them,
Cannon to left of them,
Cannon behind them
Volley'd and thunder'd;
Storm'd at with shot and shell,
While horse and hero fell,
They that had fought so well
Came thro' the jaws of Death,
Back from the mouth of Hell,
All that was left of them,
Left of six hundred.

When can their glory fade?
O the wild charge they made!
All the world wonder'd.
Honour the charge they made!
Honour the Light Brigade,
Noble six hundred!

" - Alfred Lord Tennyson
(1809 – 1892) Alfred Tennyson, 1st Baron Tennyson, FRS Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland during much of Queen Victoria's reign. He remains one of the most popular British poets. [At the Battle of Balaclava in 1854 during the Crimean War, the ‘Light Brigade’, consisting of British cavalry regiments, charged down a narrow valley against Russian Troops who had captured British guns. The Russians were at the end of the valley as well as on each side of it. The attack should never have been made, for it had no chance of success: It was due to a blunder brought on by misunderstanding an order sent by the commander-in-chief. The obedience and courage of the soldiers, of whom less than a third survived won great fame for the Light Brigade. This poem first appeared on December 9, 1854 in The Examiner. Refer http://allpoetry.com/The-Charge-Of-The-Light-Brigade ]
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[Quote No.53229] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about the little things that go a long way to helping a person get along well with others]

'Blessed Are They'

Blessed are they who are pleasant to live with --
Blessed are they who sing in the morning;
Whose faces have smiles for their early adorning;
Who come down to breakfast companioned by cheer;
Who don't dwell on troubles or entertain fear;
Whose eyes smile forth bravely; whose lips curve to say:
'Life, I salute you! Good morrow, new day!'
Blessed are they who are pleasant to live with --
Blessed are they who treat one another,
Though merely a sister, a father or brother,
With the very same courtesy they would extend
To a casual acquaintance or dearly loved friend;
Who choose for the telling encouraging things;
Who choke back the bitter, the sharp word that stings;
Who bestow love on others throughout the long day --
Pleasant to live with and blessed are they.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
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[Quote No.53269] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about individualism, living up to your best potential especially in your vocation-career and being grateful without envying others who are also unique and valuable but in some different ways to you.]

'To One Who Sighed'

You cannot sing? Well, others can.
You do not dance? but others do.
And ever since the world began
There have been certain folk like you
Who cannot dance, and cannot sing,
Nor weave a play nor write a book.

But you can sew? Most anything?
And are quite expert as a cook?
And you can draw a little bit,
Amuse your friends with pen and ink?
You make folk laugh - this you admit.
You have a lot of gifts, I think.

Oh, foolish one, to sigh and fret
Because you're not as some folk are.
Suppose a plant, of mignonette
Withered because 'twas not a star!
Be what you are, dear girl, with pride.
Accept your limits with good grace;

The world is varied, very wide;
For each of us there is a place.
Within your sphere be quite content,
Be proud of work that is your own,
And to life's complex instrument
With sweetness add your mite of tone.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
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[Quote No.53278] Need Area: Friends > General
"Envy's a coal comes hissing hot from hell." - Philip James Bailey
(1816 – 1902) English poet. Quote from the lengthy poem 'Festus' (1839), which eventually was extended to over 40,000 lines.
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[Quote No.53289] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about being kind and serving others]

'Let Me To-Day Do Something'

Let me to-day do something that shall take
A little sadness from the world's vast store.
And may I be so favoured as to make
Of joy's too scanty sum a little more

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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[Quote No.53292] Need Area: Friends > General
"Let the weakest, let the humblest remember that in his daily course he can, if he will, shed around him almost a heaven. Kindly words, sympathizing attentions, watchfulness against wounding men's sensitiveness — these cost very little but they are priceless in their value!" - Frederick William Robertson

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[Quote No.53293] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Ethics, morality, love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as you would like to be treated, reciprocity:] I expect to pass through this life but once. If, therefore, there is any kindness I can show, or any good I can do to any fellow-being, let me do it now, let me not defer it, for I shall not pass this way again." - Stephen Grellet

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[Quote No.53296] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about living up to the ideals our mothers teach us about ethics, morality, reciprocity and love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as we would like to be treated in their situation and therefore libertarian's dictum 'Only voluntary: so Informed Choice - No Force and No Fraud']

'If I Only Was the Fellow'

While walking down a crowded
City street the other day,
I heard a little urchin
To a comrade turn and say,
‘Say, Chimmey, lemme tell youse,
I’d be happy as a clam
If only I was de feller dat
Me mudder t’inks I am.’

‘She t’inks I am a wonder,
An’ she knows her little lad
Could never mix wit’ nuttin’
Dat was ugly, mean or bad.
Oh, lot o’ times I sit and t’ink
How nice, ’twould be, gee whiz!
If a feller was de feller
Dat his mudder t’inks he is.’

My friends, be yours a life of toil
Or undiluted joy,
You can learn a wholesome lesson
From that small, untutored boy.
Don’t aim to be an earthly saint
With eyes fixed on a star:
Just try to be the fellow that
Your mother thinks you are.

" - Will S. Adkin

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[Quote No.53297] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about deciding who you want to be ethically and morally]

'My Name Is Legion'

Within my earthly temple there's a crowd;
There's one of us that's humble, one that's proud,
There's one that's broken-hearted for his sins,
There's one that unrepentant sits and grins;
There's one that loves his neighbor as himself,
And one that cares for naught but fame and pelf.
From much corroding care I should be free
If I could once determine which is me.

" - Edward Sanford Martin
(1856-1939)
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[Quote No.53301] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about enjoying life and helping people ethically, morally using the 'Golden Rule' along the way]

'I Shall Not Pass This Way Again - A Symphony'

I shall not pass this way again --
Although it bordered be with flowers,
Although I rest in fragrant bowers,
And hear the singing
Of song-birds winging
To highest heaven their gladsome flight;
Though moons are full and stars are bright,
And winds and waves are softly sighing,
While leafy trees make low replying;
Though voices clear in joyous strain
Repeat a jubilant refrain;
Though rising suns their radiance throw
On summer's green and winter's snow,
In such rare splendor that my heart
Would ache from scenes like these to part;
Though beauties heighten,
And life-lights brighten,
And joys proceed from every pain, --
I shall not pass this way again.

Then let me pluck the flowers that blow,
And let me listen as I go
To music rare
That fills the air

...

And let no chance by me be lost
To kindness show at any cost.
I shall not pass this way again;
Then let me now relive some pain,
Remove some barrier from the road,
Or brighten some one's heavy load;

...

A larger kindness give to me,
A deeper love and sympathy;
Then, O, one day
May someone say --
Remembering a lessened pain --
'Would she could pass this way again'

" - Eva Rose York
[refer https://www.christforums.org/the-meaning-of-life/i-shall-not-pass-this-way-again ]
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[Quote No.53302] Need Area: Friends > General
"[The Bulwark Of Liberty:] What constitutes the bulwark of our own liberty and independence? It is not our frowning battlements, our bristling seacoast, our army and our navy. Our reliance is in the love of liberty ...planted in us. Our defense is in the spirit which prizes liberty as the heritage of all men in all lands everywhere. Destroy this spirit, and we have planted the seeds of despotism at our own doors." - Abraham Lincoln
(1809-1865), lawyer and U.S. President
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[Quote No.53344] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about bravery, heroic self-sacrifice, ethics, morality and love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as you imagine you'd want to be treated in their same situation]

'John Maynard: A Ballad Of Lake Erie'

'Twas on Lake Erie's broad expanse
One bright midsummer day,
The gallant steamer Ocean Queen
Swept proudly on her way.
Bright faces clustered on the deck
Or, leaning o'er the side,
Watched carelessly the feathery foam
That flecked the rippling tide.

Ah, who beneath that cloudless sky,
That, smiling, bends serene,
Could dream that danger, awful, vast,
Impended o'er the scene --
Could dream that ere an hour had sped
That frame of sturdy oak
Would sink beneath the lake's blue waves,
Blackened with fire and smoke?

A seaman sought the captain's side,
A moment whispered low;
The captain's swarthy face grew pale;
He hurried down below.
Alas, too late! Though quick and sharp
And clear his orders came,
No human efforts could avail
To quench the insidious flame.

The bad news quickly reached the deck,
It sped from lip to lip,
And ghastly faces everywhere
Looked from the doomed ship.
‘Is there no hope, no chance of life?’
A hundred lips implore;
‘But one,’ the captain made reply,
‘To run the ship on shore.’

A sailor whose heroic soul
That hour should yet reveal,
By name John Maynard, Eastern born,
Stood calmly at the wheel.
‘Head her southeast!’ the captain shouts
Above the smothered roar,
‘Head her southeast without delay!
Make for the nearest shore!’

No terror pales the helmsman's cheek,
Or clouds his dauntless eye,
As, in a sailor's measured tone
His voice responds ‘Ay! ay!’
Three hundred souls, the steamer's freight,
Crowd forward, wild with fear,
While at the stern the dreaded flames
Above the deck appear.

John Maynard watched the nearing flames,
But still with steady hand
He grasped the wheel and steadfastly
He steered the ship to land.
‘John Maynard, can you still hold out?’
He heard the captain cry;
A voice from the stifling smoke
Faintly responds, ‘Ay! ay!’

But half a mile, a hundred hands
Stretch eagerly to shore;
But half a mile that distance sped,
Peril shall all be o'er.
But half a mile! Yet stay, the flames
No longer slowly creep,
But gather round that helmsman bold
With fierce, impetuous sweep.

‘John Maynard!’ with an anxious voice
The captain cries once more,
‘Stand by the wheel five minutes yet,
And we shall reach the shore.’
Through flame and smoke that dauntless heart
Responded firmly still,
Unawed, though face to face with death,
‘With God's good help I will!’

The flames approach with giant strides,
They scorch his hand and brow;
One arm, disabled, seeks his side,
Ah! he is conquered now.
But no, his teeth are firmly set,
He crushes down his pain;
His knee upon the stanchion pressed,
He guides the ship again.

One moment yet! one moment yet!
Brave heart, thy task is o'er;
The pebbles grate beneath the keel
The steamer touches shore.
Three hundred grateful voices rise
In praise to God that he
Hath saved them from the fearful fire,
And from the engulfing sea.

But where is he, that helmsman bold?
The captain saw him reel;
His nerveless hands released their task;
He sank beside the wheel.
The wave received his lifeless corpse,
Blackened with smoke and fire.
God rest him! Never hero had
A nobler funeral pyre!

" - Horatio Alger, Jr.
(1832 – 1899) prolific 19th-century American author, best known for his many juvenile novels about impoverished boys and their rise from humble backgrounds to lives of middle-class security and comfort through hard work, determination, courage, and honesty. His writings were characterized by the 'rags-to-riches' narrative, which had a formative effect on America during the Gilded Age. The story of the poem is based on the actual burning and sinking of the steamboat Erie, on August 9th, 1841, at 8:10 p.m. which was so inspirational around ten authors wrote narrative poems about it. Horatio's version of this story of heroic self-sacrifice was first published in 'The Student and schoolmate; an illustrated monthly for our boys and girls', January, 1868, when he was thirty-six. [Refer http://johnmaynard.net/1841.html ]
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[Quote No.53368] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the rewards for ethics, social morality, kindness and following love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as you imagine you'd want to be treated in the same situation]

'Reward of Service'

The sweetest lives are those to duty wed,
Whose deeds both great and small
Are close-knit strands of an unbroken thread,
Where love ennobles all.
The world may sound no trumpets, ring no bells,
The Book of Life the slurring record tells.

Thy love shall chant its own beatitudes,
After its own like working. A child's kiss
Set on thy singing lips shall make thee glad;
A poor man served by thee shall make thee rich;
A sick man helped by thee shall make thee strong;
Thou shalt be served thyself by every sense
Of service which thou renderest.

" - Elizabeth Barrett Browning

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[Quote No.53378] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about how some see life as being difficult for most, rich and poor alike, until death's release.]

'Man Was Made To Mourn: A Dirge'

When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.

'Young stranger, whither wand'rest thou?'
Began the rev'rend sage;
'Does thirst of wealth thy step constrain,
Or youthful pleasure's rage?
Or haply, prest with cares and woes,
Too soon thou hast began
To wander forth, with me to mourn
The miseries of man.

'The sun that overhangs yon moors,
Out-spreading far and wide,
Where hundreds labour to support
A haughty lordling's pride;-
I've seen yon weary winter-sun
Twice forty times return;
And ev'ry time has added proofs,
That man was made to mourn.
'O man! while in thy early years,
How prodigal of time!
Mis-spending all thy precious hours -
Thy glorious, youthful prime!
Alternate follies take the sway;
Licentious passions burn;
Which tenfold force gives Nature's law.
That man was made to mourn.

'Look not alone on youthful prime,
Or manhood's active might;
Man then is useful to his kind,
Supported in his right:
But see him on the edge of life,
With cares and sorrows worn;
Then Age and Want-oh! ill-match'd pair -
Shew man was made to mourn.

'A few seem favourites of fate,
In pleasure's lap carest;
Yet, think not all the rich and great
Are likewise truly blest:
But oh! what crowds in ev'ry land,
All wretched and forlorn,
Thro' weary life this lesson learn,
That man was made to mourn.

'Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves,
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight,
So abject, mean, and vile,
Who begs a brother of the earth
To give him leave to toil;
And see his lordly fellow-worm
The poor petition spurn,
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife
And helpless offspring mourn.

'If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave,
By Nature's law design'd,
Why was an independent wish
E'er planted in my mind?
If not, why am I subject to
His cruelty, or scorn?
Or why has man the will and pow'r
To make his fellow mourn?

'Yet, let not this too much, my son,
Disturb thy youthful breast:
This partial view of human-kind
Is surely not the last!
The poor, oppressed, honest man
Had never, sure, been born,
Had there not been some recompense
To comfort those that mourn!

'O Death! the poor man's dearest friend,
The kindest and the best!
Welcome the hour my aged limbs
Are laid with thee at rest!
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow
From pomp and pleasure torn;
But, oh! a blest relief for those
That weary-laden mourn!'

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as The Bard. He was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. This poem was first published in 1784.
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[Quote No.53401] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the importance of little things.]

'Little Things'

Little drops of water,
Little grains of sand,
Make the mighty ocean
And the pleasant land.

So the little moments,
Humble though they be,
Make the mighty ages
Of Eternity.

So the little errors
Lead the soul away
From the paths of virtue
Far in sin to stray.

Little deeds of kindness,
Little words of love,
Help to make earth happy
Like the Heaven above.

" - Julia Abigail Fletcher Carney
(1823 - 1908), born Julia Fletcher, she was an American educator and poet.
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[Quote No.53406] Need Area: Friends > General
"[[Individual freedom and informed choice:] In vain may it be urged, that the good of the individual ought to yield to that of the community; for it would be dangerous to allow any private man, or even any public tribunal, to be the judge of this common good, and to decide whether it be expedient or no." - William Blackstone
Blackstone’s Commentary, Ch. 1§III, 1765-1769
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[Quote No.53407] Need Area: Friends > General
"By liberty, I understand the power which every man has over his own actions, and his right to enjoy the fruit of his labour, art, and industry, as far as by it he hurts not the society, or any members of it, by taking from any member, or by hindering him from enjoying what he himself enjoys." - Thomas Gordon
'Cato’s Letter' No. 62, 1722.
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[Quote No.53408] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Self-Defence and Martial Arts:] A man who has nothing which he is willing to fight for, nothing which he cares more about than he does about his personal safety, is a miserable creature, who has no chance of being free, unless made and kept so by the exertions of better men than himself. " - John Stuart Mills
The Contest in America, 1862.
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[Quote No.53409] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Self-Defence and Martial Arts:] War is an ugly thing, but not the ugliest of things: the decayed and degraded state of moral and patriotic feeling which thinks nothing worth a war is worse." - John Stuart Mills
The Contest in America, 1862.
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