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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.53412] Need Area: Friends > General
"That personal freedom is the natural right of every man, and that property, or an exclusive right to dispose of what he has honestly acquired by his own labor, necessarily arises therefrom, are truths which common sense has placed beyond the reach of contradiction." - Joseph Warren
Oration, March 6, 1775.
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[Quote No.53414] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Foreign policy:] I wish well to all nations and to all men. My politics are plain and simple. I think every nation has a Right to establish that form of Government under which It conceives It shall live most happy; provided it infracts no Right or is not dangerous to others. And that no Governments ought to interfere with the internal concerns of Another, except for the security of what is due to themselves." - George Washington
To General Lafayette, Mount Vernon, 25 December, 1798.
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[Quote No.53419] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Self-Defence and Martial Arts:-] The defence of one’s self, justly called the primary law of nature, is not, nor can it be abrogated by any regulation of municipal law. This principle of defence is not confined merely to the person; it extends to the liberty and the property of a man: it is not confined merely to his own person; it extends to the persons of all those, to whom he bears a peculiar relation - of his wife, of his parent, of his child, of his master, of his servant: nay, it extends to the person of every one, who is in danger; perhaps, to the liberty of every one, whose liberty is unjustly and forcibly attacked. It becomes humanity as well as justice." - James Wilson
Lectures on Law, Chap. XII, 'Of the Natural Rights of Individuals,' 1790.
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[Quote No.53433] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about self-defence, martial arts, war, human rights, courage and noble example]

'If We Must Die'

If we must die, let it not be like hogs
Hunted and penned in an inglorious spot,
While round us bark the mad and hungry dogs,
Making their mock at our accursed lot.
If we must die, O let us nobly die,
So that our precious blood may not be shed
In vain; then even the monsters we defy
Shall be constrained to honor us though dead!
O kinsmen! we must meet the common foe!
Though far outnumbered let us show us brave,
And for their thousand blows deal one death-blow!
What though before us lies the open grave?
Like men we'll face the murderous, cowardly pack,
Pressed to the wall, dying, but fighting back!

" - Claude McKay
(1889 - 1948), Jamaican-American writer and poet, who was a seminal figure in the Harlem Renaissance.
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[Quote No.53442] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Self-Defence and Martial Arts:] ...when good [freedom and informed consent] is defenseless, evil [force and fraud] wins." - Ted Nugent

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[Quote No.53444] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about kindness. Don't need to have people tell you they are having a hard time. It is best just to assume everyone, unless otherwise made clear, is having a hard time of life, with difficulties in the past, present and future and therefore treat them gently.]

'If I Had Known'

If I had known what trouble you were bearing;
What griefs were in the silence of your face;
I would have been more gentle and more caring,
And tried to give you gladness for a space.
I would have brought more warmth into the place,
If I had known.

If I had known what thoughts despairing drew you;
(Why do we never try to understand?)
I would have lent a little friendship to you,
And slipped my hand within your hand,
And made your stay more pleasant in the land,
If I had known.

" - Mary Carolyn Davies
(1888 - 1940?), American poet and writer. [Refer http://www.oregonencyclopedia.org/articles/davies_mary_carolyn_ca_1890_/#.VKA_pPXAQ ]
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[Quote No.53459] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about foreign policy, war and the leaders being held accountable if start it, rather than those in the general population suffering for the wrongs of their leaders]

'Jeannette and Jeannot'

...

Oh! if I were Queen of France, or still better, Pope of Rome,
I'd have no fighting men abroad, no weeping maids at home;
All should be at peace; or if kings must show their might,
Why, let them who make the quarrel be the only men to fight.

" - Charles Jeffries
(1807 - 1865) English music publisher and composer of songs.
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[Quote No.53460] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about foreign policy, war and the leaders being held accountable if start it, rather than those in the general population suffering for the wrongs of their leaders]

'Jeannot's Answer'

...

And you'd put an end to deeds which ladies love so well,
And have no tales of valor left for history to tell!
The soldier's is a noble trade, Jeannette; then rail no more,
Were only kings themselves to fight, there'd be an end to war!

" - Charles Jeffries
(1807 - 1865) English music publisher and composer of songs.
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[Quote No.53485] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about passing on responsibilities and challenges to those that follow, like a ball has to be passed backwards in the game of Rugby. Other examples might include business succession, cultural legacy, private inheritance, etc.]

'Vitai Lampada' ('They Pass On The Torch of Life')

There's a breathless hush in the Close to-night --
Ten to make and the match to win --
A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
An hour to play and the last man in.
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
Or the selfish hope of a season's fame,
But his Captain's hand on his shoulder smote --
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

The sand of the desert is sodden red, --
Red with the wreck of a square that broke; --
The Gatling's jammed and the Colonel dead,
And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
The river of death has brimmed his banks,
And England's far, and Honour a name,
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks:
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

This is the word that year by year,
While in her place the School is set,
Every one of her sons must hear,
And none that hears it dare forget.
This they all with a joyful mind
Bear through life like a torch in flame,
And falling fling to the host behind --
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

" - Sir Henry Newbolt
(1862-1938) English poet, novelist and historian. He also had a very powerful role as a government adviser, particularly on Irish issues and with regard to the study of English in England.
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[Quote No.53486] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the negative, bad excesses of big cities, in particular. While they are found everywhere, they are more easily seen in big cities where they are more overtly catered for. By the same token, big cities also cater for positive, good things.]

'Owed to New York'

Vulgar of manner, overfed,
Overdressed and underbred,
Heartless, Godless, hell's delight,
Rude by day and lewd by night;
Bedwarfed the man, o'ergrown the brute,
Ruled by boss and prostitute:
Purple-robed and pauper-clad,
Raving, rotting, money-mad;
A squirming herd in Mammon's mesh,
A wilderness of human flesh;
Crazed by avarice, lust and rum,
New York, thy name's 'Delirium.'

" - Byron Rufus Newton
(1861-1938). He was a war correspondent during the Spanish-American War and then after writing for the 'New York Herald' became the city's tax commissioner. Cole's 'Quotable New York' dates the above poem to 1906.
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[Quote No.53505] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about what you choose to do with your life, namely help with kindness or hinder others through lack of kindness now and in the future]

'A Bag of Tools'

Isn’t it strange
That princes and kings,
And clowns that caper
In sawdust rings,
And common people
Like you and me
Are builders for eternity?

Each is given
A bag of tools,
A shapeless mass,
A book of rules.
And each must make –
Ere life is flown
A stumbling block
Or a steppingstone

" - R. L. Sharpe
(1870-1950)
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[Quote No.53521] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about charity and kindness]

'The Blackberry Girl'

‘Why Phoebe, are you come so soon,
Where are your berries, child?
You cannot, sure, have sold them all,
You had a basket piled.’

‘No, Mother, as I climbed the fence,
The nearest way to town,
My apron caught upon a stake,
And so I tumbled down.

‘I scratched my arm and tore my hair
But still did not complain;
And had my blackberries been safe,
Should not have cared a grain.

‘But when I saw them on the ground,
All scattered by my side,
I pick'd my empty basket up,
And down I sat and cried.

‘Just then a pretty little miss
Chanced to be walking by;
She stopped, and, looking pitiful,
She begged me not to cry.

‘'Poor little girl, you fell,' said she,
'And must be sadly hurt.'
'Oh no,' I cried, 'but see my fruit
All mixed with sand and dirt!'

‘'Well, do not grieve for that,' she said;
'Go home and get some more.'
'Ah no, for I have stripped the vines;
These were the last they bore.'

‘My father, miss, is very poor,
And works in yonder stall;
He has so many little ones,
He cannot clothe us all.

‘I always longed to go to church,
But never could I go;
For when I asked him for a gown,
He always answered, No.

‘There's not a father in the world
That loves his children more;
'I'd get you one with all my heart,
But, Phoebe, I am poor.'

‘But when the blackberries were ripe,
He said to me one day,
'Phoebe, if you will take the time
That's given you to play,

‘'And gather blackberries enough,
And carry them to town,
To buy your bonnet and your shoes,
I'll try to get a gown.'

‘O miss, I fairly jumped for joy,
My spirits were so light,
And so when I had leave to play,
I picked with all my might.

‘I sold enough to get my shoes
About a week ago,
And these if they had not been spilt,
Would buy a bonnet too.

‘But now they are gone, they all are gone,
And I can get no more,
And Sundays I must stay at home
Just as I did before.

‘And, Mother, then I cried again
As hard as I could cry;
And, looking up, I saw a tear
Was standing in her eye.

‘She caught her bonnet from her head;
'Here, here,' she cried, 'take this!'
'Oh no, indeed - I fear your ma
Would be offended, miss.'

‘'My ma! No, never! She delights
All sorrow to beguile;
And 'tis the sweetest joy she feels
To make the wretched smile.

‘'She taught me when I had enough
To share it with the poor,
And never let a needy child
Go empty from the door.

‘'So take it, for you need not fear
Offending her, you see;
I have another, too, at home,
And one's enough for me.

‘So then I took it - here it is;
For, pray, what could I do?
And, Mother, I shall love that miss
As long as I love you.’

" - Nancy Sproat

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[Quote No.53527] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about social history, helping children and others learn key historical dates, people and activities - using poetic rhyme and rhythm as a memory aid or mnemonic]

'The History of The U.S.'

In fourteen hundred ninety-two,
Columbus sailed the ocean blue
And found this land, land of the Free,
beloved by you, beloved by me.

And in the year sixteen and seven,
good Captain Smith thought he’d reach Heav’n,
And then he founded Jamestown City,
alas, ’tis gone, oh, what a pity.

’Twas in September sixteen nine,
with ship, Half Moon, a read Dutch sign,
That Henry Hudson found the stream,
the Hudson River of our dream.

In sixteen twenty, pilgrims saw
our land that had no unjust law.
Their children live here to this day,
proud citizens of U.S.A.

In sixteen hundred eighty-three,
good William Penn stood ’neath a tree
And swore that unto his life’s end
he would be the Indian’s friend.

In seventeen hundred seventy-five,
good Paul Revere was then alive;
He rode like wild throughout the night,
and called the Minute Men to fight.

Year seventeen hundred seventy-six,
July the fourth, this date please fix
Within your minds, my children dear,
for that was Independence Year.

In that same year on a bitter night
at Trenton was an awful fight,
But by our brave George Washington
the battle was at last well won.

Two other dates in your mind fix -
Franklin born in seventeen six,
And Washington first said 'Boo-Hoo'
in seventeen hundred thirty-two.

In seventeen hundred seventy-nine,
Paul Jones, who was a captain fine,
Gained our first naval victory
fighting on the big, wide sea.

And in the year eighteen and four,
Lewis and Clark both went before,
And blazed for us the Oregon Trail
where men go now in ease by rail.

In eighteen hundred and thirteen,
on great Lake Erie could be seen
Our Perry fight the Union Jack
and drive it from our shores far back.

In eighteen hundred and sixty-one,
an awful war was then begun
Between the brothers of our land,
who now together firmly stand.

In eighteen hundred sixty-three,
each slave was told that he was free
By Lincoln, with whom few compare
in being kind and just and fair.

In eighteen hundred eighty-one,
at Panama there was begun
By good De Lesseps, wise and great,
the big canal, now our ship’s gate.

At San Juan, eighteen ninety-eight,
our brave Rough Riders lay in wait,
And on the land brought victory,
while Dewey won it on the sea.

In nineteen hundred and fifteen,
was shown a panoramic screen
At San Francisco’s wondrous fair;
all peoples were invited there.

But cruel war in that same year
kept strangers from our land o’ cheer,
And nineteen seventeen brought here
the war that filled our hearts with fear.

Thank God in nineteen eighteen
Peace on earth again was seen,
And we are praying that she’ll stay
forever in our U.S.A.

" - Winifred Sackville Stoner, Jr
(1902–1983), She was a prodigious poet and child prodigy. Her development was heavily influenced by her mother and collaborator Winifred Sackville Stoner (1870-1931), who was known as 'Mother Stoner,' and founded the Natural Education movement and promoted the importance of fun in learning. Winifred Sackville Stoner, Jr. proved a successful learner in her own right. By age three, the younger Stoner could read and write capably; by six, she could use a typewriter and had had an illustrated book of her poems published; by eight, she spoke at least five languages and had translated Mother Goose into Esperanto ('Patrino Anserino'). At nine, she passed the entrance exams for a prominent national university. Winifred Sackville Stoner, Jr. is especially known for poems, rhymes and mnemonic jingles that aid in the recollection of information. One of her best known poems is quoted above. While some people may be able to recite it, verbatim, most know only its first two lines: 'In fourteen hundred ninety-two, Columbus sailed the ocean blue'
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[Quote No.53532] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about charm]

'What is Charm?'

Charm is the measure of attraction's power
To chain the fleeting fancy of an hour
And rival all the spell of Beauty's dower.

A subtle grace of heart and mind that flows
With tactful sympathy; the sweetest rose,
If not the fairest, that the garden knows.

A quick responsiveness in word and deed,
A dignity and stateliness at need,
The will to follow or the art to lead.

She to whom this most gracious gift is known
Has Life's great potent factor for her own
And rules alike the cottage and the throne.

" - Louisa Carroll Thomas
American woman [dower = entitlement] [Refer http://www.archive.org/stream/cu31924022006062/cu31924022006062_djvu.txt ]
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[Quote No.53536] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about social history, helping children and others learn key historical people, activities, etc - using poetic rhyme and rhythm as a memory aid or mnemonic]

'England's Sovereigns in Verse'

NORMAN KINGS:
William the Conqueror long did reign;
William, his son, by an arrow was slain;
Henry the First was a scholar bright;
Stephen was king without any right.

PLANTAGENET:
Henry the Second, Plantagenet's scion;
Richard the First was as brave as a lion;
John, though a tyrant, the Charter signed;
Henry the Third had a weakly mind.
Edward the First conquered Cambria dales;
Edward the Second was born Prince of Wales;
Edward the Third humbled France in its pride;
Richard the Second in prison died.

HOUSE OF LANCASTER:
Henry the Fourth for himself took the crown;
Henry the Fifth pulled the French king down;
Henry the Sixth lost his father's gains.

HOUSE OF TUDOR:
Edward of York laid hold of the reins;
Edward the Fifth was killed with his brother;
Richard the Third soon made way for another.
Henry the Seventh was frugal of means;
Henry the Eighth had a great many queens.
Edward the Sixth reformation began;
Cruel Queen Mary prevented the plan.
Wise and profound were Elizabeth's aims.

STUART LINE:
England and Scotland were joined by King James.
Charles found the people a cruel corrector;
Oliver Cromwell was called Lord Protector;
Charles the Second was hid in an oak,
James the Second took Popery's yoke.
William and Mary were offered the throne,
Anne succeeded and reigned alone.

HANOVERIAN KINGS:
George the First from Hanover came;
George the Second kept up the name;
George the Third was loved in the land,
George the Fourth was polite and grand;
William the Fourth had no heir of his own,
So Queen Victoria ascended the Throne.

When good Queen Victoria's long reign was o'er
Edward the Seventh the English crown wore;
George the Fifth rules the vast realm of England today
And 'God Save the King!' all his subjects' hearts say.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53538] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about the books in the Christian religion's Bible, helping children and others learn them, if they so desire - using poetic rhyme and rhythm as a memory aid or mnemonic]

'Old and New Testament Contents'

In Genesis , the world was made;
In Exodus, the march is told;
Leviticus contains the Law;
In Numbers are the tribes enrolled.

In Deuteronomy again,
We're urged to keep God's law alone;
And these five Books of Moses make
The oldest holy writing known.

Brave Joshua to Canaan leads;
In Judges, oft the Jews rebel;
We read of David's name in Ruth
And First and Second Samuel.

In First and Second Kings we read
How bad the Hebrew state became;
In First and Second Chronicles
Another history of the same.

In Ezra, captive Jews return,
And Nehemiah builds the wall;
Queen Esther saves her race from death.
These books 'Historical' we call.

In Job we read of patient faith;
In Psalms are David's songs of praise;
The Proverbs are to make us wise;
Ecclesiastes next portrays,

How fleeting earthly pleasures are;
The Song of Solomon is all
About true love, like Christ's; and these
Five books 'Devotional' we call.

Isaiah tells of Christ to come,
While Jeremiah tells of woe,
And in his Lamentations mourns
The Holy City's overthrow.

Ezekiel speaks of mysteries;
And Daniel foretells kings of old;
Hosea over Israel grieves;
In Joel blessings are foretold.

In Amos, too, are Israel's woes;
And Obadiah's sent to warn;
While Jonah shows that Christ should die
And Micah where he should be born.

In Nahum Nineveh is seen;
Habakkuk tells of Chaldea's guilt;
In Zephaniah are Judah's sins;
In Haggai the Temple's built.

Then Zechariah speaks of Christ,
And Malachi of John, his sign;
The Prophets number seventeen,
And all the books are thirty-nine.

Matthew, Mark, Luke and John
Tell what Christ did in every place;
The Acts tell what the Apostles did,
And Romans how we're saved by grace.

Corinthians instruct the Church;
Galatians shows us faith alone;
Ephesians, true love, and in
Philippians God's grace is shown.

Colossians tells us more of Christ,
And Thessalonians of the end;
In Timothy and Titus both
Are rules for pastors to attend.

Philemon, Christian friendship shows.
Then Hebrews clearly tell how all
The Jewish law prefigured Christ;
And these Epistles are by Paul.

James shows that faith by works must live,
And Peter urges steadfastness;
While John exhorts to Christian love,
For those who have it God will bless.

Jude shows the end of evil men,
And Revelation tells of Heaven.
This ends the whole New Testament
And all the books are twenty-seven.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53539] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about social history, helping children and others learn key historical dates, people and activities - using poetic rhyme and rhythm as a memory aid or mnemonic]

'U.S. Presidents'

First stands the lofty Washington,
That noble, great, immortal one.
The elder Adams next we see,
And Jefferson comes number three;
Then Madison is fourth you know,
The fifth one on the list, Monroe;
The sixth, then Adams comes again,
And Jackson seventh in the train.
Van Buren eighth upon the line
And Harrison counts number nine.
The tenth is Tyler in his turn,
And Polk the eleventh, as we learn.
The twelfth is Taylor in rotation,
The thirteenth Fillmore in succession;
The fourteenth, Pierce, has been selected,
Buchanan, fifteenth is elected;
Sixteenth, Lincoln rules the nation;
Johnson, seventeenth, fills the station;
As the eighteenth Grant two terms serves;
Nineteenth, Hayes our honor preserves;
Twentieth, Garfield becomes our head;
Twenty-first, Arthur succeeds the dead;
Then Cleveland next was selected;
Twenty-third, Harrison's elected;
Twenty-fourth, Cleveland is recalled;
Twenty-fifth, McKinley twice installed;
Twenty-sixth, Roosevelt, strenuous, firm;
Taft, twenty-seventh, serves his term;
Twenty-eighth, Wilson holds the place,
A nation's problems has to face.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53545] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about social history, helping children and others learn key historical dates, people and activities - using poetic rhyme and rhythm as a memory aid or mnemonic]

'Our Presidents - A Memory Rhyme'

First on the list is Washington, Virginia's proudest name;
John Adams next, the Federalist, from Massachusetts came;
Three sons of old Virginia into the White House go -
'Twas Jefferson, and Madison, and then came James Monroe.

Massachusetts for one term sent Adams called John Q.,
And Tennessee a Democrat, brave Jackson staunch and true.
Martin Van Buren of New York, and Harrison we see,
And Tyler of Virginia, and Polk of Tennessee.

Louisiana Taylor sent; New York Millard Fillmore;
New Hampshire gave us Franklin Pierce; when his term was o'er
The keystone state Buchanan sent. War thunders shook the realm
Abe Lincoln wore a martyr's crown, and Johnson took the helm.

Then U.S. Grant of Illinois who ruled with sword and pen;
And Hayes, and Garfield who was shot, two noble Buckeye men.
Chester Arthur from New York, and Grover Cleveland came;
Ben Harrison served just four years, then Cleveland ruled again.

McKinley - shot at Buffalo - the nation plunged in grief,
And 'Teddy' Roosevelt of New York served seven years as chief.
Taft of Ohio followed him. Then Woodrow Wilson came -
New Jersey's learned Democrat; war set the world aflame;

And when the tide of strife and hate its baneful course had run,
The country went Republican and Warren Harding won.
No duty would he shirk, - he died while on a western trip;
Coolidge of Massachusetts then assumed the leadership.

" - Isabel Ambler Gilman

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[Quote No.53562] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about war, done with alphabet verse and alliteration]

'The Siege Of Belgrade'

An Austrian army, awfully arrayed,
Boldly by battery besieged Belgrade.
Cossack commanders cannonading come,
Dealing destruction's devastating doom.
Every endeavor engineers essay,
For fame, for fortune fighting, -- furious fray!
Generals 'gainst generals grapple -- gracious God!
How honors Heaven heroic hardihood!
Infuriate, indiscriminate in ill,
Kindred kill kinsmen, kinsmen kindred kill.
Labor low levels longest loftiest lines;
Men march mid mounds, mid moles, mid murderous mines;
Now noxious, noisy numbers nothing, naught
Of outward obstacles, opposing ought;
Poor patriots, partly purchased, partly pressed,
Quite quaking, quickly 'Quarter! Quarter!' quest.
Reason returns, religious right redounds,
Suwarrow stops such sanguinary sounds.
Truce to thee, Turkey! Triumph to thy train,
Unwise, unjust, unmerciful Ukraine!
Vanish, vain victory! vanish, victory vain!
Why wish we warfare? Wherefore welcome were
Xerxes, Ximenes, Xanthus, Xavier?
Yield, yield, ye youths! ye yeomen, yield your yell!
Zeus's, Zarpater's, Zoroaster's zeal,
Attracting all, arms against acts appeal!

" - Alaric Alexander Watts
(1797 - 1864), British poet and journalist. Many versions of this alliterative poem appeared in American and British magazines throughout the 19th century.
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[Quote No.53586] Need Area: Friends > General
"Never, never, never believe any war will be smooth and easy, or that anyone who embarks on the strange voyage can measure the tides and hurricanes he will encounter. The statesman who yields to war fever must realise that once the signal is given, he is no longer the master of policy but the slave of unforeseeable and uncontrollable events....... Always remember, however sure you are that you could easily win, that there would not be a war if the other man did not think he also had a chance." - Winston Churchill
on the Anglo-Boer War
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[Quote No.53598] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Ethics and reciprocity: More often than not...] The world is a great mirror. It reflects back to you what you are. If you are loving, if you are friendly, if you are helpful, the world will prove loving and friendly and helpful to you. The world is what you are." - Thomas Dreier

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[Quote No.53611] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Kindness:] I have always held firmly to the thought that each one of us can do a little to bring some portion of misery to an end." - Albert Schweitzer
(1875-1965) Humanitarian, Theologian, Philosopher, Physician and winner of the Nobel Peace Prize 1952.
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[Quote No.53612] Need Area: Friends > General
"The smallest act of kindness is worth more than the greatest intention." - Khalil Gibran
(1883-1931) Lebanese-American philosophical essayist, novelist, mystical poet and artist.
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[Quote No.53613] Need Area: Friends > General
"The whole meaning of socialism is a systematic glorification of force...[and the destruction of the importance of the unique individual and their freedom, choice, power and responsibility]." - Auberon Herbert
(1838-1906) English author
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[Quote No.53614] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Who would be for a more powerful, statist, paternalist government that is 'responsible' for giving them a 'satisfactory' life but at the necessary cost of their individual independence - both freedom and responsibility? Of course, those that do not have the life-skills to make productive, fulfilling use of their freedom! After all ...] To the frustrated, freedom from responsibility is more attractive than freedom from restraint. They are eager to barter their independence for relief from the burdens of willing, deciding and being responsible for inevitable failure. They willingly abdicate the directing of their lives to those who want to plan, command and shoulder all responsibility." - Eric Hoffer
(1902-1983) American author and philosopher, who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
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[Quote No.53615] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Morality for the Jewish and Christian Religions:]

The Ten Commandments [also known as the Decalogue]:

1.- I am the Lord your God, who brought you out of the land of Egypt, out of the house of bondage. You shall have no other gods before Me.
2.- You shall not make for yourself a carved image, or any likeness of anything that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth; you shall not bow down to them nor serve them. For I, the Lord your God, am a jealous God, visiting the iniquity of the fathers on the children to the third and fourth generations of those who hate Me, but showing mercy to thousands, to those who love Me and keep My Commandments.
3.- You shall not take the name of the Lord your God in vain, for the Lord will not hold him guiltless who takes His name in vain.
4.- Remember the Sabbath day, to keep it holy. Six days you shall labor and do all your work, but the seventh day is the Sabbath of the Lord your God. In it you shall do no work: you, nor your son, nor your daughter, nor your male servant, nor your female servant, nor your cattle, nor your stranger who is within your gates. For in six days the Lord made the heavens and the earth, the sea, and all that is in them, and rested the seventh day. Therefore the Lord blessed the Sabbath day and hallowed it.
5.- Honor your father and your mother, that your days may be long upon the land which the Lord your God is giving you.
6.- You shall not murder.
7.- You shall not commit adultery.
8.- You shall not steal.
9.- You shall not bear false witness against your neighbor.
10.- You shall not covet your neighbor's house; you shall not covet your neighbor's wife, nor his male servant, nor his female servant, nor his ox, nor his donkey, nor anything that is your neighbor's.

" - Bible
Exodus 20:2-17 and Deuteronomy 5:6-21 [refer http://www.the-ten-commandments.org/the-ten-commandments.html ]
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[Quote No.53616] Need Area: Friends > General
"A society that puts equality... ahead of freedom will end up with neither equality nor freedom." - Milton Friedman
(1912-2006) Nobel Prize-winning economist and economic advisor to President Ronald Reagan.
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[Quote No.53617] Need Area: Friends > General
"Governing a large country is like frying a small fish. You spoil it with too much poking [interference]." - Lao-Tzu
(570 BC - 490 BC) 'Old Sage', Father of Taoism.
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[Quote No.53618] Need Area: Friends > General
"The essential characteristic of Western civilization that distinguishes it from the arrested and petrified civilizations of the East was and is its concern for freedom from the state. The history of the West, from the age of the Greek polis down to the present-day resistance to socialism, is essentially the history of the fight for liberty [individual freedom and responsibility] against the encroachments of the officeholders [who are ever hungry for more power to feed their personal vision of the future and their destiny to force it into existence in their lifetime]." - Ludwig Von Mises
(1881-1973) Economist and social philosopher
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[Quote No.53619] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Individual freedom and responsibility:] Man exists for his own sake [both good and bad] and not to add a laborer to the State." - Ralph Waldo Emerson
(1803-1882). Source: 'Journal', 1839.
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[Quote No.53620] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Using force or fraud is immoral:] But to manipulate [rather than persuade women and] men, to propel them toward goals which you -- the social reformers [governments, politicians, bureaucrats, experts, prophets, etc] -- see, but they may not, is to deny their human essence [independent, free individuals], to treat them as objects without wills of their own, and therefore to degrade them [and yourselves]." - Isaiah Berlin
(1909-1997). Source: 'Two Concepts of Liberty', 1958.
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[Quote No.53623] Need Area: Friends > General
"True heroism is remarkably sober, very undramatic. It is not the urge to surpass all others at whatever cost, but the urge to serve others, at whatever cost." - Arthur Ashe
(1943-1993) American World No. 1 professional tennis player.
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[Quote No.53624] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Politicians must be wary of believing they have a destiny or a mandate to create what they envision against the wishes of those they 'lead' or 'serve'.] Those who lack the capacity to achieve much in an atmosphere of freedom [where they must persuade others to their way of thinking voluntarily] will clamor for power [because then they can force their desires on others without the need for their freely given consent]." - Eric Hoffer
(1902-1983) American author and philosopher, who was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom.
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[Quote No.53625] Need Area: Friends > General
"Gentlemen, the time is coming when there will be two great classes, Socialists, and Anarchists. The Anarchists want the government to be nothing [and the individual to be everything], and the Socialists want government to be everything [and the individual to be nothing]. There can be no greater contrast. Well, the time will come when there will be only these two great parties, the Anarchists representing the laissez faire doctrine and the Socialists representing the extreme view on the other side, and when that time comes I am an Anarchist." - William Graham Sumner
(1840-1910) American academic and professor at Yale College. Source: quoted in Mark Thornton, 'The Economics of Prohibition' (University of Utah Press, 1991), p. 17.
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[Quote No.53626] Need Area: Friends > General
"The [U.S] Constitution was made to guard the people against the dangers of good intentions." - Daniel Webster
(1782-1852), US Senator
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[Quote No.53627] Need Area: Friends > General
"At the end of a century that has seen the evils of communism, Nazism and other modern tyrannies, the impulse to centralize power [at the expense of individual power, freedom and responsibility] remains amazingly persistent." - Joseph Sobran
(1946-2010) Columnist
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[Quote No.53630] Need Area: Friends > General
"We want a society in which we are free to make choices, to make mistakes, to be generous and compassionate. That is what we mean by a moral society – not a society in which the State is responsible for everything, and no one is responsible for the State." - Margaret Thatcher
(1925-2013) British Prime Minister (1979–1990). Source: Speech, Zurich University, 14 March 1977.
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[Quote No.53631] Need Area: Friends > General
"It is becoming increasingly apparent that many -- arguably most -- of the problems that plague our [U.S.] nation have been aggravated rather than alleviated by [U.S.] federal intervention. In one area after another, massive infusions of tax dollars have been squandered on false solutions which, when they fail to achieve their stated objectives, are cited to justify even more spending on other futile schemes that result in bigger government. Examples include programs and laws supposedly intended to reduce racial animosity which have instead heightened race-related tensions; welfare schemes that, rather than reducing poverty, have enticed millions of Americans to become dependent on Washington for their daily bread; federal funding (and control) of education, which has spawned a monumental education crisis; a 'war' on drugs which has done little to curb drug traffic, but which has eroded many personal liberties; a health-care finance system that has deteriorated as government meddling and regulation have increased; and a masochistic immigration policy larded with false 'solutions' that, while failing to stop the inflow of illegal aliens, have paved the way for further government intrusion into the lives of nearly all Americans." - Robert W. Lee
Source: Danger of Government Intrusion, THE NEW AMERICAN, February 19, 1996, p. 53.
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[Quote No.53639] Need Area: Friends > General
"[There is a reason to have a Bill of Rights to protect individuals from their government and from the majority in a democracy, because while we wouldn't do anything 'evil' who knows who will be in charge later therefore:] When we are planning for posterity, we ought to remember that virtue is not hereditary." - Thomas Paine

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[Quote No.53680] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Self-Defence and Martial Arts:] I do not love the bright sword for its sharpness, nor the arrow for its swiftness, nor the warrior for his glory. I love only that which they defend." - J. R. R. Tolkien
(1892 - 1973)
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[Quote No.53681] Need Area: Friends > General
"Politics: [at its best is] the art of achieving the maximum amount of freedom for individuals that is consistent with the maintenance of social order." - Barry Goldwater
(1909 - 1998)
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[Quote No.53709] Need Area: Friends > General
"If you have an important point to make, don't try to be subtle or clever. Use a pile driver. Hit the point once. Then come back and hit it again. Then hit it a third time - a tremendous whack." - Winston Churchill

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[Quote No.53723] Need Area: Friends > General
"No one can deal with the hearts of men as he ought, unless he has the sympathy which is given by love!" - Henry Ward Beecher

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[Quote No.53742] Need Area: Friends > General
"The rule of the many by the few we call tyranny: the rule of the few by the many is tyranny also; only of a less intense kind. [The latter kind, for example the rule of a majority in a democracy - which can be very unfair to a minority, is mitigated by a Bill of Rights that limits what even the majority can do to any individual!]" - Herbert Spencer

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[Quote No.53743] Need Area: Friends > General
"What a cage is to the wild beast, law is to the selfish man." - Herbert Spencer

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[Quote No.53752] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Individualism:] I think the reward for conformity is that everyone likes you except yourself." - Rita Mae Brown

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[Quote No.53753] Need Area: Friends > General
"The only way human beings can win a war is to prevent it." - George Marshall
(1880-1959) US Army Chief, Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense, Nobel laureate.
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[Quote No.53769] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Values, ethics, morality, reciprocity, 'The Golden Rule', the seven deadly vices and the seven virtues:] The Seven Deadly Sins: Sins have always been popular areas of focus in the church. An early 2nd century document, the Didache, contains a list of five. Origen produced a sevenfold list and at the end of the 4th century Cassian amended this sevenfold list. Eventually, the Seven Deadly Sins (or Vices) we know today were defined in the 6th century by Pope Gregory the Great, as a set of negative values: the values that you are supposed to adopt is that you will avoid these things and actually adopt their opposites. --- 1.Pride is an excessive belief in one's own abilities. --- 2.Envy is wanting what others have, be it status, abilities, or possessions. --- 3.Gluttony is the desire to eat or consume more than you require. --- 4.Lust is a powerful craving for such as sex, power and money. --- 5.Anger is the loss of rational self-control and the desire to harm others. --- 6.Greed is the desire for material wealth or gain. --- 7.Sloth is laziness and the avoidance of work. Note how many of these are very similar: envy, gluttony, lust and greed are all about desire. There is also a hidden lack of concern for others in at least envy and anger. As with other religious rule-sets, these pretty much hit the nail on the head in terms of a system for social harmonization or social control (depending on your viewpoint). Few people will openly admit to any of them (which attests to the success in the inculcation of these as anti-values in the Christian world). The number seven, by the way, is not only a cabbalistic magical number, it also just happens to be the size of our short-term memory, which is a real limit to the number of things we can hold in mind at one time. -------------------------------------------------- The Seven Virtues: When Pope Gregory defined the seven deadly sins that we should avoid, he also included a counter-balancing set of values that we should espouse and adopt. These are: --- 1.Faith is belief in the right things (including the virtues!). --- 2.Hope is taking a positive future view, that good will prevail. --- 3.Charity is concern for, and active helping of, others. --- 4.Fortitude is never giving up. --- 5.Justice is being fair and equitable with others. --- 6.Prudence is care of and moderation with money. --- 7.Temperance is moderation of needed things and abstinence from things which are not needed. The first three of these are known as the Spiritual Virtues, whilst the last four are called the Chief or Natural Virtues. The Natural Virtues had already been defined by Greek philosophers, whilst the Spiritual Virtues are a slight variation on St. Paul's trio of Love, Hope and Faith (due to variation in translation from the original: Charity and Love arguably have a high level of overlap). There are also a number of other sets of virtues, including: == The Seven Contrary Virtues which are specific opposites to the Seven Deadly Sins: Humility against pride, Kindness against envy, Abstinence against gluttony, Chastity against lust, Patience against anger, Liberality against greed, and Diligence against sloth. == The Theological Virtues: Love, Hope and Faith, as defined by St. Paul (who placed love as the greatest of them all). == The four Cardinal Virtues: Prudence, Temperance, Courage and Justice. == The Seven Heavenly Virtues: Faith, Hope, Charity, Fortitude, Justice, Temperance, Prudence. == The Seven Corporal Works of Mercy are a medieval list of things you can do to help others: feed the hungry, give drink to the thirsty, give shelter to strangers, clothe the naked, visit the sick, minister to prisoners, and bury the dead. == The Seven Bushido Virtues: Right decisions, Valor, Benevolence, Respect, Honesty, Honor, and Loyalty. [== Benjamin Franklin's Thirteen Virtues: temperance, silence, order, resolution, frugality, industry, sincerity, justice, moderation, cleanliness, tranquillity, chastity and humility.]" - changingminds.org
[Refer http://changingminds.org/explanations/values/deadly_sins.htm http://changingminds.org/explanations/values/seven_virtues.htm
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[Quote No.53776] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty! --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve! --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.53782] Need Area: Friends > General
"You must not lose faith in humanity. Humanity is like an ocean; if a few drops of the ocean are dirty, the ocean does not become dirty." - Mahatma Gandhi
Indian independence movement leader
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