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  Quotations - Gratitude  
[Quote No.63240] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"When life's problems seem overwhelming, look around and see what other people are coping with. You may consider yourself fortunate!" - Ann Landers

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[Quote No.63290] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[To be happy and grateful:] Count your blessings - not your troubles." - Dale Carnegie

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[Quote No.63343] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Find the good and praise it!!" - Alex Haley

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[Quote No.63371] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Trauma isn't what happens to you, it's what happens inside you. [Traumatic experiences are self-defined by what the individual's subjective mind compares the experience to. If it is compared to something better then the experience is less than good, while if it is compared to something worse then the experience is better than bad!]" - Dr. Gabor Maté
Physician who specializes in neurology, psychiatry, and psychology.
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[Quote No.63373] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Framing is a process whereby communicators, consciously or unconsciously, act to construct a point of view that encourages the facts of a given situation to be interpreted by others in a particular manner. [For example that things could be better if want a negative spin or things could be worse if want a positive spin.]" - Jim Kuypers
Assistant Professor of Communications, Virginia Tech.
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[Quote No.63395] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"I would rather be able to appreciate things I cannot have, than to have things I am not able to appreciate." - Elbert Hubbard

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[Quote No.63404] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"You may not always be able to control and change what happens to you but you can always control and change your response by controlling and changing your perspective: - the way you see, interpret and value what happens to you. To go from unhappy and bitter to happy and grateful you just need to reframe your experience. You just need to change the frame of reference, the yardstick you measure the experience by: - what you compare the experience to. If you compare any experience to something better, in quality or quantity, you will feel worse (unhappy and bitter), but if you compare that same experience to something worse, in quality or quantity, you will feel better (happier and grateful). Therefore your experience of life is subjective and relative: - it is in your total control and is a matter of free choice and imagination!" - Ben O'Grady
Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the Imagi-Natives company and the www.imagi-natives.com website.
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[Quote No.63413] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Learn to enjoy every minute of your life. Be happy now. Don't wait for something outside of yourself to make you happy in the future. Think how really precious is the time you have to spend, whether it's at work or with your family. Every minute should be enjoyed and savored. [But how? By remembering that things could always be worse. S be relieved and grateful!]" - Earl Nightingale

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[Quote No.63429] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Happiness not in another place, but this place, not for another hour, but this hour. [But how? By being conscious of the fact that things could be worse but aren't. So you feel relief, gratitude and happiness!]" - Walt Whitman
'Leaves of Grass'
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[Quote No.63436] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[With many experiments, experience and age comes the practical wisdom to focus on what is good and enjoyable and to distract from what is bad and painful:] Older people consistently reported just as many positive emotions as the younger participants, but had fewer negative ones. They also had more mixed emotions, meaning that they didn't let frustration or anxiety keep them from saying they were happy. Consciously or unconsciously, they were making the choice to be happy even when there were reasons to feel otherwise... Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, the researchers found that the emotional processing center of older people's brains, the amygdala, fired more actively when they looked at positive images than negative ones; younger brains reacted to both equally. In this, older brains resemble the brains of people who meditate. ...Gerontologists [who study the aging] consider the tendency to sustain mixed feelings, rather than try to resolve them, as a component of elder wisdom, a recognition that life doesn't have to be all good to be good, and also that it never will be. Troubles are always with us, and getting rid of this one or that won't make us happy; it'll just move another hardship to the head of the class. Karl Pillemer of Cornell makes the distinction between 'happy in spite of' and 'happy if only,' the former being a benefit of old age, the latter a vexation of youth. 'Happy in spite of' entails a choice to be happy; it acknowledges problems but doesn't put them in the way of contentment. 'Happy if only' pins happiness on outside circumstances: if only I had more money, less pain, a nicer spouse or house, I'd be happy as a clam... Fulfillment need not be what's just around the corner. In the end, wisdom lies in finding it in the imperfect now. [And remembering, as you live and journey towards your goals: a= the wise ability to control where you focus your attention - on the good rather than the bad and; b= the skill to compare your experiences with what is worse so feel relieved, grateful and happy rather than comparing your experiences with what is better and feeling unsatisfied, bitter, and unhappy." - John Leland
Quote from his book, 'Happiness Is a Choice You Make: Lessons from a Year Among the Oldest Old'.
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[Quote No.63460] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[Why we habituate, accommodate and take things for granted; why we do not continue to appreciate and be grateful and happy for the good things that we have:] 'Unhappiness Is a Palate-Cleanser - Why it's impossible to always be happy'. Happiness, in one form or another, seems to be a common goal that most of us would like to attain. We often behave as though we might find a route to contentment - comfort, satiety, warmth, or some other reward - and be happy all the time if we could just make the right choices. But pleasure is often fleeting, even from the most appealing experiences, giving rise to ennui and sparking the drive for something new and sensational. As a neuroscientist, I can't help wondering whether the transience of our satisfaction may not in fact be inescapable and instead may reveal an inevitable aspect of the way the brain works, the understanding of which might provide a clue to how to contend with it. Many moment-to-moment functions of the brain seem so natural that we can hardly distance ourselves enough to reflect upon them: The brain notices. It is obvious, once we consider it, that a basic job of the brain is to perceive; with those perceptions it can evaluate; and based on those evaluations, it can act. This work is carried out by neurons of the nervous system. They detect and represent input from the outside world (and the inside world), analyze the data, and then respond to this analysis with an appropriate action. Action generally involves movement: Neurons send the signals that make muscles contract and let you do things. The input is sensory, the analysis is often called associative, and the output is motor. The sensory-associative-motor triplet is the neural version of perceiving, evaluating, and doing. How do the neurons that compose the brain conduct the business of detecting and analyzing what is happening out there in the world? The simplified answer is that they rely first on a translation service. The body parts that we think of as our sense organs - eyes, ears, noses, tongues, skin - contain sensory receptor cells, so called because they receive information. Tiny protein molecules sit on the membranes of those cells and translate (or, to use the technical term, transduce) physical stimuli from the outside world - light, sound, chemicals, and heat - into electrical signals called action potentials, which form the language of the brain. The transduction proteins form or connect to a minuscule pathway, or ion channel, through which charged particles called ions, like sodium and potassium, enter or exit the cell. The movement of ions makes the electrical signals. Each electrical signal spreads along the length of the cell by means of other proteins - which also form ion channels - ultimately culminating in the release of a chemical neurotransmitter. The next neuron receives the neurotransmitter via other receptor proteins, which also are themselves ion channels or are coupled to ion channels. Our ability to notice lies largely in our ion channel proteins. The interesting part is that nearly all these proteins respond to changes in stimuli, but in the presence of long-lasting, constant stimulation of mild to moderate intensity, many of them quite literally shut themselves down and stop allowing ions to flow through them. We call this process adaptation (or desensitization or inactivation, depending on its physical basis). It leads to familiar experiences with respect to the senses. Adaptation is why, for example, when you go from a brightly lit space into a dim room, it seems dark at first, but after a while you no longer perceive darkness; the lighting seems normal. Only when you go back into the sun does the change make you realize how dim it was before—or how brilliant it is now. Similarly, most people adapt to the scent of cooking soon after entering a restaurant, or the coolness of a swimming pool after jumping into it on a hot day, or the background hum of a refrigerator. After a short exposure, the aroma or chill or noise - unless it is overwhelming to the point of discomfort - becomes undetectable and goes unnoticed. In the common parlance, you get used to it. In part because of our adapting ion channels, we perceive many things not by their absolute value but by their contrast to what came before.1 In an extreme case, experimentalists have been able to demonstrate this phenomenon by stabilizing an image on the retina. Our eyes generally dart around in so-called microsaccades, which let our retinal cells compare the light reflected from dark and light areas in any visual scene. By monitoring a person's eye movements and shifting a projected image accordingly, visual neuroscientists can demonstrate that when an image is artificially held in a fixed position on the retina, the person 'sees' the image disappear.2 Without one's being able to make comparisons, the world goes gray. In other words, it's not just that variety is the spice of life; it’s variance that lets us sense anything at all. This sensitivity to change and insensitivity to constancy doesn't stop at the level of sensory receptors. Deeper in the brain, in almost every neuron, are other ion channel proteins - particularly sodium channels, which start action potentials (by letting sodium ions into a neuron), and potassium channels, which end action potentials (by letting potassium ions out of a neuron). Both sodium and potassium channels come in many varieties, and many of these ion channels also inactivate - that is, turn themselves off - with use. Consequently, even when chemical neurotransmitters provide a prolonged or repeated stimulus to neurons, the intrinsic properties of ion channels limit how many action potentials are produced. For instance, in some neurons, the inactivation of sodium channels makes it progressively more difficult for action potentials to be generated in the face of constant stimulation.3 Meanwhile, specific potassium channels gradually increase their ion flow, helping to slow or shut down a neuron's signaling after a few action potentials. This interaction between sodium and potassium ion flow permits electrical signals to be generated only at the outset of a stimulus, a process called accommodation. Although there are exceptions, most of the principal excitatory cells of the cortex and hippocampus - the ones that encourage action potentials in the neurons they target - tend to accommodate.4 We don't always know what kinds of information these accommodating neurons are carrying, but we do know that they respond most strongly to changing stimuli.5 Similarly, neurotransmitter receptor proteins can undergo desensitization, in which their ion channels shut themselves off in real time as prolonged stimuli arrive at the neuron.6 But neurons also have an interesting ability to respond to long-term increases in neurotransmitter exposure - over days or longer timeframes which might result from excessive signaling through a particular neural circuit - by simply consuming their own neurotransmitter receptors, leaving fewer working receptors available on the cell surface. In part, such responses can underlie tolerance to medications, drugs of abuse, and even spicy food.7 Conversely, when neurotransmitter release falls, a given neuron can produce more receptor proteins and associated ion channels. In this way, overstimulation reverts to producing a normal degree of input, and understimulation sets up a neural circuit to be extra sensitive even to small signals. How does a cell know? A variety of cellular feedback systems, many of which make use of the special biochemical properties of calcium ions, allows neurons to figure out, so to speak, the comfortable or appropriate point between too much and too little. Processes like these may be engaged when a stimulus that was initially pleasurable - or aversive - is experienced over and over again. The acute perception fades as the brain finds its own set point.8 At the level of the whole organism, the feelings from those perceptions fluctuate accordingly, diminishing to repeated stimuli and being restored only when a change takes place. A simple illustration of this phenomenon occurs in the sea slug Aplysia, which initially retracts its gill in response to a light touch. With a series of harmless touches, it habituates, ceasing to react, until the touch is paired with something more aversive, like a shock.9 In a more pleasurable arena of sensation, hungry rats will expend effort to obtain either ordinary or palatable food, whereas rats that have eaten to satiety will work only to get new treats they find especially tasty. The rats' motivation to work for edibles can be reduced by drugs that interfere with receptors for natural opiates and dopamine, which are neurotransmitters in brain circuits that signal rewards. The idea, therefore, is that reward pathways are stimulated by the anticipation and/or consumption of food, but for sated rats only if the food compares favorably with their recent experience.10 In other words, there is no need to save room for dessert; it will be just as pleasurable as long as it is better than what came before. Familiar stimuli and the experiences they generate can also trigger other modifications of ion channels and neurotransmitter receptors, and these modifications can alter whole neural circuits. In fact, certain circuits in the brains of many animals (including us) are so good at predicting the outcome of well-known stimuli that they send inverse signals that actively cancel out the perception of what is going on. The organism doesn't even notice what is happening - at least until something different or surprising intervenes.11 The ability to get used to and ultimately ignore incoming information that is static, familiar, predictable, and non-harmful turns out to be helpful behaviorally; in other words, it offers an evolutionary advantage. Continuing to notice sensations like the light touch of our clothes on our arms or the mild fragrance of the laundry detergent we used to wash them would be distracting, to say the least, and might even interfere with our ability to detect and respond to a signal that mattered, like a tap on the shoulder or our toast burning. In fact, an inability to predict and thereby adapt may be a contributing factor to conditions like autism spectrum disorders.12 Besides, it's wasteful to send brain signals to report information we already know about. When all those ions flow in and out of cells to send signals within our brains, they cannot just remain on the opposite side from where they started. It literally consumes energy to pump sodium back out of neurons and potassium back into them, so it is most efficient not to generate action potentials that don't carry worthwhile information. Does this mean that only novelty matters and that everything familiar must be discarded once the experience wears off? On the contrary; I think it offers a key to happiness that is compatible with how the brain works. The ability to detect even familiar stimuli can usually be restored by a brief palate cleanser, which literally permits a recovery from desensitization sufficient to intensify a subsequent experience. It is hard for me to assess how much I am waxing poetic, but it seems to me that the brain's ability - its need - to perceive by contrast may partly explain why our efforts to achieve perennial satisfaction have been largely unsatisfactory. Because the brain grades on a curve, endlessly comparing the present with what came just before, the secret to happiness may be unhappiness. Not unmitigated unhappiness, of course, but the transient chill that lets us feel warmth, the sensation of hunger that makes satiety so welcome, the period of near-despair that catapults us into the astonishing experience of triumph. The route to contentment [gratitude and happiness] is through contrast [and comparison with something that is worse]. ======= Footnotes: -- 1. Not all behavioral adaptation comes from ion channels that change rapidly, on the timescale of the stimulus. Many other long-term changes can take place, some of which may involve ion channel function or javascript:existence) and some of which tap into a variety of cellular processes. Also, not every sensation or perception is subject to adaptation, one of the most familiar sensations being the experience of pain. -- 2. Ditchburn, R.W. & Ginsborg, B.L. Vision with a stabilized retinal image. Nature 170, 36-37 (1952).; Martinez-Conde, S., Macknic, S.L., Troncoso, X.G., & Dyar, T.A. Microsaccades counteract visual fading during fixation. Neuron, 49, 297-305 (2006). -- 3. In contrast, some neurons have specialized sodium channels in which inactivation is circumvented by the intervention of an additional protein that literally blocks the usual inactivation process. These neurons readily fire long trains of high-frequency action potentials. Many such neurons are found in the cerebellum and brainstem. Lewis, A.H. & Raman, I.M. Resurgent current of voltage-gated Na+ channels. Journal of Physiology 592, 4825–4838 (2014). -- 4. In some cells, accommodation can be reversed by neurotransmitters like noradrenaline (norepinephrine), which suppresses the ionic current through specific potassium channels, called SK channels. It is interesting that the global effect on the brain of noradrenaline is often an increase in attention. Many toxins and poisons, such as those of scorpions and snakes, however, also prevent inactivation of sodium channels and block potassium channels, leading to convulsions and death, again revealing that the brain can suffer from too much of a good thing. Madison, D.V. & Nicoll, R.A. Actions of noradrenaline recorded intracellularly in rat hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurones, in vitro. Journal of Physiology 372, 221–244 (1986).; Hille, B. A K+ channel worthy of attention. Science 273, 1677 (1996). -- 5. Although it is hard to resist the tempting conclusion that more brain activity is necessarily better, the ability of some neurons to shut down their own neuronal signaling by ion channel inactivation is often a good idea. A variety of neurological diseases is associated with too many action potentials in neurons that normally signal relatively sparsely. These disorders of 'hyperexcitability' include some pain syndromes as well as epilepsy. The former yields too much sensation, and the latter yields too much muscle contraction; the symptoms depend on which classes of neurons get hyperactive. Often, the best medications for such conditions promote the inactivation of sodium channels. Even people without pain syndromes may be familiar with the pain-relieving effect of blocking sodium channels by their experience with Novocain at the dentist's office or lidocaine cream on sunburn. Medications for epilepsy are tailored not to shut down neural activity altogether but to constrain hyperactive neurons to accommodate. -- 6. Neurotransmitter receptors can shut down rapidly by desensitization, which is intrinsic to the protein, or by a short lifetime of the neurotransmitter itself, as it is destroyed by enzymes or soaked up by neighboring glial cells. Drugs and toxins that interfere with these processes and prolong the action of neurotransmitters can have dramatic effects on the nervous system. Benzodiazepines and other anxiolytic drugs extend the duration of ion flow through channels opened by the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. Nerve gas prolongs the action of acetylcholine, the neurotransmitter that makes muscles contract. -- 7. The detection of spicy food is not done by neurotransmitter receptors in the brain but by chemical receptors at the periphery that respond to capsaicin, the naturally occurring chemical that makes chili peppers hot and painful. In an interesting twist on drug tolerance, capsaicin can be used as an ointment to desensitize and internalize receptors and relieve pain associated with conditions like arthritis and neuropathy. -- 8. This process is referred to as homeostasis, and much work has been directed toward studying 'homeostatic plasticity' in neural circuits - the process by which neurons restore a basic set point of activity, even as the strength of the inputs that stimulate them varies. Turrigiano, G. Homeostatic synaptic plasticity: Local and global mechanisms for stabilizing neuronal function. Cold Spring Harbor Perspectives in Biology 4, a005736 (2012). -- 9. In the case of habituation, neurotransmitter receptors don't desensitize, but the neurons releasing chemical neurotransmitters run out of neurotransmitter. Kandel, E.R. & Schwartz, J.H. Molecular biology of learning: Modulation of transmitter release. Science 218, 433–443 (1982). -- 10. Barbano, M.F. & Cador, M. Opioids for hedonic experience and dopamine to get ready for it. Psychopharmacology 191, 497–506 (2007). -- 11. An interesting illustration of a brain's ability to disregard the familiar comes from electric fish, which have an electric sense that lets them detect electric fields. These fish actively explore their environment by emitting a signal called an electric organ discharge (EOD) - the fish's own stereotyped 'call,' which produces an electric field around the fish. If an object is in the vicinity, the electric field is distorted - perhaps loosely analogous to feeling the distortion of your skin when you press on an object. It's the deviation of the signal from the usual that indicates the possibility of something worth fleeing from or investigating. The fish's own EOD signals nothing of potential significance. Accordingly, neurons that generate the EOD also send signals within the fish brain indicating that they have done so. The signal is exactly the opposite of the sensory input that the fish receives from its own undistorted EOD, effectively neutralizing the fish's sensation of its own 'call' when there is nothing to be detected. Bell, C., Bodznick, D., Montgomery, J. Bastian, J. The generation and subtraction of sensory expectations within cerebellum-like structures. Brain Behavior and Evolution 50, 17–31 (1997). -- 12. Gomot M. & Wicker, B. A challenging, unpredictable world for people with autism spectrum disorder. International Journal of Psychophysiology 83, 240–247 (2012)." - Indira M. Raman
Professor in the department of neurobiology at Northwestern University. As published in 'Think Tank: Forty Scientists Explore the Biological Roots of Human Experience', edited by David J. Linden, and published by Yale University Press [and on March 15, 2018 in http://nautil.us/issue/58/self/unhappiness-is-a-palate_cleanser ] .
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[Quote No.63524] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"I endeavor to take things as they come with cheerfulness [grateful that things are not worse], and when I cannot get a dinner to suit my taste, I endeavor to get a taste to suit my dinner [grateful that I at least have a dinner]." - Washington Irving

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[Quote No.63528] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Feeling sorry for [rather than grateful that things are not worse for] yourself, and your present condition, is not only a waste of energy but the worst habit you could possibly have." - Dale Carnegie

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[Quote No.63534] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Being happy doesn't mean that everything is perfect. It means that you've decided to look beyond the imperfections [and be grateful that things are not worse]. " - Anonymous

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[Quote No.63535] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"The only reason you suffer is because you choose to suffer [by comparing your situation with one that is better]. The only reason you are happy is because you choose to be happy [by comparing your situation with one that is worse]. Happiness is a choice, and so is suffering." - don Miguel Ruiz

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[Quote No.63536] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Happiness depends more on the inward disposition of mind [of choosing to be grateful that things are not worse], than on outward circumstances [that could always be better]." - Benjamin Franklin

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[Quote No.63537] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Happiness is not a brilliant climax to years of grim struggle and anxiety. It is a long succession of little decisions simply to be happy in the moment [by choosing to be grateful that things are not worse]." - J. Donald Walters

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[Quote No.63550] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"When you arise in the morning, think of what a precious privilege it is to be alive - to breathe, to think, to enjoy, to love [and be very grateful]." - Marcus Aurelius

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[Quote No.63571] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"When you welcome your emotions as teachers, every emotion brings [gratitude-inspiring] good news, even the ones that are painful." - Gary Zukav

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[Quote No.63573] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[When you compare the past to how it could have been better - beyond what it teaches about improving future action - than to how it could have been worse, you encourage and inspire regret, bitterness and ignorance rather than relief, gratitude and wisdom:] The 3 R's that Plague Humanity: Regret, Resentment, and Revenge." - Jonathan Lockwood Huie

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[Quote No.63574] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[When you compare the past to how it could have been better - beyond what it teaches about improving future action - than to how it could have been worse, you encourage and inspire regret, bitterness and ignorance rather than relief, gratitude and wisdom:] Life is too short, time is too precious, and the stakes are too high to dwell on what might have been." - Hillary Clinton

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[Quote No.63575] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[When you compare the past to how it could have been better - beyond what it teaches about improving future action - than to how it could have been worse, you encourage and inspire regret, bitterness and ignorance rather than relief, gratitude and wisdom:] Regret is an appalling waste of energy, you can't build on it - it's only good for wallowing in." - Katherine Mansfield

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[Quote No.63576] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"[When you compare the past to how it could have been better - beyond what it teaches about improving future action - than to how it could have been worse, you encourage and inspire regret, bitterness and ignorance rather than relief, gratitude and wisdom:] He who spends time regretting the past, loses the present and risks the future." - Quevedo

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[Quote No.63691] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"To overcome the anxieties and depressions of contemporary life, individuals must become independent of the social environment to the degree that they no longer respond exclusively in terms of its rewards and punishments. To achieve such autonomy, a person has to learn to provide rewards to herself. She has to develop the ability to find enjoyment and purpose regardless of external circumstances. [One way that works is to remember that it could always be worse and so feel relieved and grateful that it isn't!]" - Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi

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[Quote No.63740] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Always start with thanksgiving; be thankful for what you already have and see the miracles that come from this one simple act." - Jim Rohn

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[Quote No.63762] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Feel the Joy of Living [and be grateful]: Appreciate the gift of life. At least once every day, feel the simple joy of being alive. Imagine yourself in a situation in which you're about to die. Concentrate and feel what that would be like. Then picture yourself being given another chance. The more vividly you can imagine this, the greater you will be able to feel the joy of life itself." - Rabbi Zelig Pliskin
Quote from his book, 'Gateway to Happiness', p.39.
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[Quote No.63827] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"This 'gratitude exercise' will have a positive effect when you practice it at least 10 times a day. It is advisable to practice it at least once an hour for the first week. You'll be grateful you did.
[Touch forehead]
I am grateful for my mind to think good thoughts.
[Touch near eyes]
I am grateful for my eyes to see good things.
[Touch ears]
I am grateful for my ears to hear good things.
[Touch near mouth]
I am grateful for my mouth to speak good things.
[Raise hands]
I am grateful for my hands to do good things.
[Move feet slightly]
I am grateful for my feet to walk to do good.
I am grateful for all that I can be grateful for.

" - Rabbi Zelig Pliskin

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[Quote No.63833] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"There's always failure. And there's always disappointment. And there's always loss. But the secret is learning from the loss, and realizing that none of those holes are vacuums [- empty of any good - which would be even worse - so there's always something to be grateful for]." - Michael J. Fox

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[Quote No.63857] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Happiness [including gratitude] is not a station you arrive at, but a manner of traveling." - Margaret Lee Runbeck

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[Quote No.63860] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"Happiness is the art of learning how to get joy from your substance [and experience - by appreciating it could always be worse and so being relieved and grateful that it isn't]." - Jim Rohn

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[Quote No.63882] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"The marvelous richness of human experience would lose something of rewarding joy [and gratitude] if there were no limitations to overcome [or worse to avoid]. The hilltop hour would not be half so wonderful if there were no dark valleys to traverse. " - Helen Keller
(1880 - 1968) American Blind and Deaf Author and Lecturer
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[Quote No.63885] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"If you can't be thankful for what you have, be thankful for what you've escaped." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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