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  Quotations - Food  
[Quote No.25800] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Say Grace] For what we are about to receive, May the Lord make us truly thankful. Amen. " - Christian

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[Quote No.25801] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Say Grace] Thank you God for food and care. Teach us how to love and share. Amen." - Christian

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[Quote No.25808] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Say Grace] As the chinese say, 'When eating bamboo sprouts, remember the person who planted them' - so let us remember and be grateful for all those who have contributed to this meal and to all our blessings. " - unknown
based on a Chinese proverb
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[Quote No.25809] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Say Grace] As is said in the Zen meal chant - 'This meal is the labor of countless beings; let us remember their toil' - Let us remember and be grateful to all those who have contributed to this meal and to all our many blessings." - unknown
Based on a Zen meal chant
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[Quote No.25849] Need Area: Food > Food
"A good meal ought to begin with hunger." - French Proverb

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[Quote No.27637] Need Area: Food > Food
"One must eat to live and not live to eat." - Moličre
17th century French playwright and actor
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[Quote No.28584] Need Area: Food > Food
"One of the very nicest things about life is the way we must regularly stop whatever it is we are doing and devote our attention to eating." - Luciano Pavarotti
Famous Tenor. Quoted from the book, ''Pavarotti, My Own Story' by Luciano Pavarotti and William Wright.
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[Quote No.32868] Need Area: Food > Food
"[When we eat unhealthily...] We are digging our graves with our teeth." - Thomas Moffett

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[Quote No.32938] Need Area: Food > Food
"Eat Less by 'Wetting' Your Appetite: If you are too hungry when you sit down to a meal, you will probably overeat and end up feeling way too full. Try this: Drink two full glasses of water 15 minutes before you eat. I tried it recently and found that I ate considerably less. You wouldn't think the water could have that much of an effect. But it does!" - Michael Masterson

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[Quote No.34924] Need Area: Food > Food
"Glutton: one who digs his grave with his teeth." - French Proverb

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[Quote No.35016] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Say Grace] May we achieve our goals today, And appreciate, All that comes our way." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.36262] Need Area: Food > Food
"Want to learn to eat a lot? Here it is: Eat a little. That way, you will be around long enough to eat a lot." - Anthony Robbins

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[Quote No.37369] Need Area: Food > Food
"Cooking is an act of love, a gift, a way of sharing with others..." - Sophia Loren
(1934 - ), Italian film actress. Her birth name was Sofia Villani Scicolone.
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[Quote No.37753] Need Area: Food > Food
"I don't eat junk foods and I don't think junk thoughts." - Peace Pilgrim

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[Quote No.38323] Need Area: Food > Food
"All individuals in today's society with so many food choices, especially fast food, need to consider their dietary and exercise regimes in creating a healthy, happy lifestyle. While many foods taste great, not all of the options are healthy in the long run. From personal experience and research I have found that the best result for myself is a diet high in vegetables - raw and cooked, medium in protein - fish, meat and eggs, low in carbohydrates, sugar, and fruit, and nearly no dairy or processed food, combined with daily exercise. For those interested in learning more, an internet search for more information about these key elements will provide many reports from nutritionists that can help them make up their minds and implement these dietary and exercise regimes. I particularly recommend researching the Volumetrics and the Nutritarian diets!!" - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.38729] Need Area: Food > Food
"Diets high in protein (e.g., lean meats, eggs, low-fat cheeses, nuts, legumes) and rich in complex carbohydrates stabilize blood sugar levels and also help people feel more energetic and focused. Unfortunately, most individuals have a diet filled with simple sugars (e.g., candy, cake, pastries, ice cream) and simple carbohydrates (e.g., white bread, pasta, white rice, potatoes). This kind of diet results in depression, negativity, lethargy, mental fuzziness, and poor concentration. Be sure to eat complex carbohydrates (e.g., whole-grain bread or crackers, brown rice) and to stay away from simple, refined carbohydrates. Also, don't go too long without food because low blood sugar will make you feel anxious and irritable. Finally, make sure you balance your high-protein diet with healthy portions of vegetables. " - Barry Farrell
organizational psychologist
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[Quote No.38795] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy natural diet and nutrition: In our modern Western society, where lifestyle diseases are becoming much more common, it is perhaps worth exploring with your doctor the potential to eat less unhealthy food and in their place eat more vegetables, fruits, nuts and beans, because...] In prospective studies of adults, compared to non-vegetarian eating patterns, vegetarian-style eating patterns have been associated with improved health outcomes — lower levels of obesity, a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, and lower total mortality. Several clinical trials have documented that vegetarian eating patterns lower blood pressure. On average, vegetarians consume a lower proportion of calories from fat (particularly saturated fatty acids); fewer overall calories; and more fiber, potassium, and vitamin C than do non-vegetarians. Vegetarians generally have a lower body mass index. These characteristics and other lifestyle factors associated with a vegetarian diet may contribute to the positive health outcomes that have been identified among vegetarians." - U.S. Department of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
Quote from the 2010 version of 'Dietary Guidelines for Americans', a report that is issued every five years.
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[Quote No.39607] Need Area: Food > Food
"Remember, men [and women] need laughter sometimes more than food." - Anna Fellows Johnston

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[Quote No.41568] Need Area: Food > Food
"My doctor told me to stop having intimate dinners for four. Unless there are three other people." - Orson Welles

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[Quote No.46470] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy natural diet and nutrition:] How Much Protein Should You Be Eating?... The answer – wait for it – depends on who (and what) you are. Your goals, your age, your activity levels, your size, and your health status all impact how much protein you need. And although individual protein requirements ultimately depend on dozens of variables that we can’t really know, there are some baseline intakes that can serve as a foundation for different groups. Let’s take a look. ---The Sedentary--- The RDA [Recommended Daily Allowance] of 0.8 g protein/kg bodyweight or 0.36 g protein/lb bodyweight assumes you are sedentary, uninterested in gaining muscle, and free of health issues that might compromise your lean mass. If that describes you, the RDA is a good baseline from which to experiment. Just don’t go below that. ---The Active--- Athletes need more protein than the average person, but perhaps not as much as most fitness enthusiasts think (or consume). A 2011 paper on optimal protein intakes for athletes concluded that 1.8 g protein/kg bodyweight (or 0.8 g protein/lb bodyweight) maximizes muscle protein synthesis (while higher amounts are good for dieting athletes interested in preserving lean mass), whereas another settled on 'a diet with 12-15% of its energy as protein,' assuming 'total energy intake is sufficient to cover the high expenditures caused by daily training' (which could be quite high). One study even found benefit in 2-3 g protein/kg bodyweight (0.9-1.4 g protein/lb bodyweight) for athletes, a significant increase over standard recommendations. That said, I wouldn’t be too quick to discount anecdotal evidence or 'iron lore.' A significant-enough portion of the strength training community swears by 1-2 g protein/lb bodyweight that it couldn’t hurt to try if lower amounts aren’t working for you. ---The Dieters--- Weight loss involves a caloric deficit (whether arrived at spontaneously or consciously). Unfortunately, caloric deficits rarely discriminate between lean mass and body fat, while most people are interested in losing fat, not muscle/bone/tendon/sinew/organ. Numerous studies show that increasing your protein intake during weight loss will partially offset the lean mass loss that tends to occur. In obese and pre-obese women, a 750 calorie diet with 30% of calories from protein (about 56 grams) preserved more lean mass during weight loss than an 18% protein diet. Another study in women showed that a 1.6 g protein/kg bodyweight (or 0.7 g protein/lb bodyweight) diet led to more weight loss, more fat loss, and less lean mass loss than a 0.8 g protein/kg bodyweight diet. Among dieting athletes, 2.3 g protein/kg bodyweight (or a little over 1 g protein/lb bodyweight) was far superior to 1.0 g protein/kg bodyweight in preserving lean mass. And, although specific protein intake recommendations were not stated, a recent meta-analysis concluded that high-protein weight loss diets help preserve lean mass. ---The Injured--- Healing wounds increases protein requirements. After all, you’re literally rebuilding lost or damaged tissue, the very definition of an anabolic state. One review recommends around 1.5 g protein/kg bodyweight or close to 0.7 g protein/lb bodyweight for injured patients. ---The Elderly--- The protein RDA may not suffice for older people, who lose thigh muscle mass and exhibit lower urinary nitrogen excretion when given the standard 0.8 g protein/kg bodyweight. What’s good for the goose may not be good for the elderly, frail gander. More recent studies indicate that a baseline intake of 1.0-1.3 g protein/kg bodyweight or 0.5-0.6 g protein/lb bodyweight is more suitable for the healthy and frail elderly to ensure nitrogen balance. As always, active seniors will probably do better with slightly more, and evidence suggests that increasing protein can both improve physical performance without necessarily increasing muscle mass and increase muscle mass when paired with extended resistance training in the elderly." - Mark Sisson
[Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/how-much-protein-should-you-be-eating/#ixzz2SSNXv6by]
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[Quote No.46471] Need Area: Food > Food
"Protein: Brain cells, muscle, skin, hair and nails are just some of the body parts that are protein-based. Estimates suggest that about half of the human body’s dry weight is made up of protein. Many of the foods we eat contain protein, particularly flesh foods (chicken, beef, lamb and fish), and legumes like beans and lentils. These proteins are digested to release amino acids. In the body, amino acids are used to make new proteins, converted into hormones such as adrenalin or are used as an energy source. ---How much protein you need--- The amount of protein you need in your diet depends on your weight, age and health. As a rough guide, the recommended dietary intake (RDI) for protein (measured in grams per kilogram of bodyweight) is: --0.75 g/kg for adult women --0.84 g/kg for adult men --Around 1 g/kg for pregnant and breastfeeding women, and for men and women over 70 years. So, for example, a 75 kg [165lb = 11.8 stone] adult male would need 63 g of protein per day. It is recommended that 15 to 25 per cent of total energy intake per day is from protein sources. The needs of children and adolescents also vary according to their age and weight. A full list of recommendations for dietary protein is available from the Australian Nutrient Reference Values (NRVs) website. Most Australians eat far more protein than they actually need, so deficiencies are rare. ---Sources of protein--- Some sources of dietary protein include: --Meat, poultry and fish --Cereal and cereal-based products --Eggs --Dairy products --Seeds and nuts --Beans and lentils --Soy products --Grains, especially wheat, and less so rice, barley and corn. The Australian Guide to Healthy Eating recommends the following serves per day from the lean meat, poultry, fish, eggs, legumes and beans, and nuts and seeds food category: --3 serves for adult men --2˝ serves for adult women --2˝ to 3˝ serves for breastfeeding and pregnant women A standard serving size is one of the following: --65 g cooked lean red meats --80 g cooked poultry --100 g cooked fish fillet --2 large eggs --1 cup cooked dried beans, lentils, chickpeas, split peas or canned beans --170 g tofu --30 g nuts or seeds. Adult men are recommended to consume 2˝ serves of (mostly low-fat) dairy or alternatives per day and 2˝ to 4 serves per day for adult women. A serve could include either: --250 ml (1 cup) milk --200 g (3/4 cup or 1 small carton) yoghurt --40 g (2 slices) hard cheese ---Amino acids explained--- Proteins are made up of chains of smaller building blocks called amino acids, which are chemically linked to each other. There are about 20 different amino acids that, in different combinations, make up the countless millions of proteins available in nature. A protein can consist of between 50 and tens of thousands of amino acids. There are two broad classes of amino acids: those that can be made by the human body (non-essential amino acids) and those that can only be supplied by food (essential amino acids). ---Nutritional value of protein--- A protein’s nutritional value is measured by the quantity of essential amino acids it provides. Different foods contain different numbers and amounts of amino acids. Generally speaking: Animal products (such as chicken, beef or fish) contain all of the essential amino acids. Soy products and the seed of a leafy green called Amaranth (consumed in Asia and the Mediterranean) also contain all of the essential amino acids. However, plant proteins usually lack at least one amino acid. People following a strict vegetarian or vegan diet need to choose a variety of protein sources from a combination of plant foods throughout the day to get an adequate mix of amino acids. For example, a meal containing cereals and legumes, such as baked beans on toast, provides all the essential amino acids found in a typical meat dish. ---Digestion of proteins--- A protein-rich food, such as meat, is broken down into individual proteins by the gastric juices in your stomach. Pancreatic enzymes released into the first portion of your small intestine (duodenum) split the proteins into their separate amino acids. The amino acids are absorbed by the small finger-like projections (villi) lining the intestine walls, and are taken to the liver via the bloodstream. ---How amino acids are used--- The human body uses amino acids in three main ways: Protein synthesis – new proteins are created constantly. For example, as old, dead cells are sloughed off the skin surface, new ones are pushed up to replace them. Precursors of other compounds – a range of substances are created using amino acids, (for example, the brain chemical (neurotransmitter) serotonin and the ‘fight or flight’ chemical adrenalin). Energy – although carbohydrates are the body’s preferred fuel source, about 10 per cent of energy is obtained from protein. ---Ammonia – a toxic by-product of protein--- One of the by-products of protein metabolism is ammonia. In high levels, ammonia is extremely dangerous to the body and so is converted into urea. This water-soluble chemical is collected by the kidneys and eliminated from the body in our urine. The more protein we eat each day, in excess of our needs, the more work our kidneys must do to expel ammonia. ---Amount of protein needed each day--- Some people, such as growing children, pregnant women and breastfeeding mothers, need slightly more protein than the recommended daily intake (RDI). However, most Australians consume more than enough dietary protein, so deficiencies are rare. From 50 years onwards, ageing is associated with loss of skeletal muscle, a condition known as sarcopenia, which, in the elderly is worsened by chronic illness, poor diet and inactivity. It is likely that protein intake at the upper end of the RDI range can maintain muscle mass and strength, which is vital for walking ability. It is also important for the elderly to eat protein ‘effectively’, which means to consume high-quality protein foods, such as lean meats. ---Strenuous exercise doesn’t mean you need extra protein--- Contrary to popular belief, people who exercise vigorously or are trying to put on muscle mass do not need to consume extra protein. Studies show that weight-trainers who do not eat extra protein (either in food or protein powders) still gain muscle at the same rate as weight-trainers who supplement their diets with protein. A very high-protein diet can strain the kidneys and liver, and prompt excessive loss of the mineral calcium. ---Timing of protein consumption--- Soon after exercising (either resistance or aerobic), it is recommended consuming a high-quality protein source (such as a glass of milk or tub of yoghurt) combined with a carbohydrate meal to help positive protein balance. Studies have shown this to be beneficial for maintaining protein balance even when following low to moderate aerobic exercise (such as walking), particularly for older adults. ---Symptoms of protein deficiency--- The human body cannot store protein, so it must be supplied on a daily basis from the foods we eat. Strict vegetarians who do not consume any animal products at all are at increased risk of protein deficiency if they do not eat a wide range of plant proteins. Symptoms of protein deficiency include: --Wasting and shrinkage of muscle tissue --Oedema (build-up of fluids, particularly in the feet and ankles) --Anaemia (the blood’s inability to deliver sufficient oxygen to the cells, usually caused by dietary deficiencies such as lack of iron) --Slow growth (in children). ---Very high protein diets are dangerous--- Some weight trainers and bodybuilders believe that high protein diets lead to increased muscle mass. High protein diets promote intakes of protein of between 200 and 400 g per day, which equates to approximately 5 g/kg each day (more than five times the RDI). This belief is false. It is the stimulation of muscle tissue through exercise, not extra dietary protein, that leads to muscle growth. The RDI for protein provides adequate protein to build and repair muscles even for body builders and athletes. Fad diets that favour very high protein and fat intake, combined with very low carbohydrate intake, may be harmful. Some of the problems with very high protein diets (more than 35 per cent of total daily intake) include that: They usually promote a very low intake of carbohydrates. Glucose, made when your body breaks down dietary carbohydrate, is your body’s preferred fuel source. If your body does not receive enough dietary carbohydrate, it will break down muscle tissue to make glucose. This causes muscle wastage, reduced metabolism and a build-up of ketones. Fibre is largely a carbohydrate. Foods rich in carbohydrates (such as wholegrains and legumes) are also rich in fibre. Avoiding these foods leads to an overall low-fibre intake, which can result in constipation, bowel disorders and increased risk of colon cancer. There is evidence to suggest that the heart may not function as well if its main source of fuel is ketones. High intake of animal products (which is usually recommended in such diets) can also be high in saturated fats and cholesterol, which is associated with a range of conditions including heart disease. The liver and kidneys are put under strain because they have to detoxify and eliminate unusually high quantities of protein by-products. Kidney problems may be exacerbated in people with diabetes. There is an increased risk of developing gout and gall bladder colic. Greater losses of body calcium may increase the risk of osteoporosis. High protein diets can cause mild dehydration due to increased water loss through urine. Increased risk of dehydration puts the body under pressure. Recent research shows that weight loss over one year is not greater on a high protein diet when compared to safer, low fat eating patterns. " - Victorian State Government in Australia
[http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/bhcv2/bhcarticles.nsf/pages/protein?open ]
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[Quote No.46481] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy diet:] Your body cannot require anything in nature it cannot acquire. [If you can't find it in the wild, don't eat it!]" - Ray Audette
Quote from his low-carb, paleo-nutrician book, 'Neanderthin: Eat Like a Caveman to Achieve a Lean, Strong, Healthy Body'
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[Quote No.46482] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, natural nutrition:] The paleolithic diet (abbreviated paleo diet or paleodiet), also popularly referred to as the [primal diet], caveman diet, Stone Age diet and hunter-gatherer diet, is a modern nutritional plan based on the presumed ancient diet of wild plants and animals that various hominid species habitually consumed during the Paleolithic era — a period of about 2.5 million years which ended around 10,000 years ago with the development of agriculture and grain-based diets. In common usage, such terms as 'paleolithic diet' also refer to the actual ancestral human diet. Centered on commonly available modern foods, the 'contemporary' Paleolithic diet consists mainly of fish, grass-fed pasture raised meats, eggs, vegetables, fruit, fungi, roots, and nuts, and excludes grains, legumes, dairy products, potatoes, refined salt, refined sugar, and processed oils. First popularized in the mid-1970s by gastroenterologist Walter L. Voegtlin, this nutritional concept has been promoted and adapted by a number of authors and researchers in several books and academic journals. A common theme in evolutionary medicine, Paleolithic nutrition is based on the premise that modern humans are genetically adapted to the diet of their Paleolithic ancestors and that human genetics have scarcely changed since the dawn of agriculture, and therefore that an ideal diet for human health and well-being is one that resembles this ancestral diet. Proponents of this diet argue that modern human populations subsisting on traditional diets allegedly similar to those of Paleolithic hunter-gatherers are largely free of diseases of affluence [lifestyle], and that multiple studies of the Paleolithic diet in humans have shown improved health outcomes relative to other widely recommended diets. Supporters also point to several potentially therapeutic nutritional characteristics of preagricultural diets." - wikipedia.org

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[Quote No.46492] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy natural diet and nutrition: Simply by eating less pasta or bread and more veggies, you could lose a dress or pants size in a year.] You can save from 100-200 calories if you reduce the portion of starch on your plate and increase the amount of vegetables." - Cynthia Sass, RD
a spokeswoman for the American Dietetic Association. [http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/15-best-diet-tips-ever ]
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[Quote No.46494] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy natural diet and nutrition:] ... low-carbohydrate diets [are] ... based on the idea that controlling the level of insulin, ‘the master hormone of human metabolism,’ helps regulate blood pressure, cholesterol, triglycerides, and fat storage. Researchers have long known that carbohydrates cause the body to produce insulin and that high levels of insulin inhibit the breakdown of fatty deposits in the body. In contrast, low intake of carbohydrates keeps insulin levels low, forcing the production of a counterbalancing hormone, glucagon, which seeks energy from the body's supply of stored fat. Therefore, one loses weight. ... when carbohydrates are severely restricted ... a state of ketosis [is created], which happens when fat breaks down to the point where ketone bodies are produced and excreted in the urine. Ketones are incompletely burned fat... so that any ketones ‘you get rid of without actually using them for energy means you are ditching unwanted fat without having to actually burn it off.’ ... Ketones are the natural by-product of fat breakdown, normal and important sources of energy. To facilitate getting rid of these ketones, ... [it is helpful] to increase your fluid intake by as much as 50%, to at least two quarts of water-based fluids a day." - webmd.com
[http://www.webmd.com/diet/protein-power-what-it-is?page=2 ]
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[Quote No.46501] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Life expectancy would grow by leaps and bounds if green vegetables smelled as good as bacon." - Doug Larson

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[Quote No.46511] Need Area: Food > Food
"The more you eat, the less flavor; the less you eat, the more flavor." - Chinese Proverb

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[Quote No.46512] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] An apple a day keeps the doctor away." - Proverb

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[Quote No.49651] Need Area: Food > Food
"Hunger is the best sauce. " - Italian Proverb

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[Quote No.52784] Need Area: Food > Food
"6. We never repent of having eaten too little." - Thomas Jefferson
From 'Thomas Jefferson's Decalogue For The Practical Life'. Found in a letter from him at his home 'Monticello', dated February 21, 1825.
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[Quote No.53011] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Poem: about being grateful. It can be used as a way of saying Grace before any meal, but it is especially appropriate before the meal for the holiday of Thanksgiving.]

'We Thank Thee'
Lord, behold our family here assembled.
We thank Thee for this place in which we dwell;
for the love that unites us;
for the peace accorded us this day;
for the hope with which we expect the morrow;
for the health, the work, the food, and the bright skies, that make our lives delightful;
and for our friends in all parts of the earth.
Let peace abound in our small company.

Purge out of every heart the lurking grudge.
Give us grace and strength to forbear and to persevere.
Give us the grace to accept and to forgive offenders.
Forgetful ourselves, help us to bear cheerfully the forgetfulness of others.
Give us courage and gaiety and the quiet mind.
Spare to us our friends, soften to us our enemies.

Bless us, if it may be, in all our innocent endeavors.
If it may not, give us the strength to encounter
that which is to come,
that we be brave in peril, constant in tribulation,
temperate in wrath,
and in all changes of fortune, and, down to the gates of death,
loyal and loving one to another.

" - Robert Louis Stevenson
(1850 – 1894) Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson - Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer.
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[Quote No.53012] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Food: Breakfast Grace]

The day returns and brings ...concerns and duties. ...help us to perform them with laughter and kind faces, let cheerfulness abound with industry. ...bring us to our resting beds weary and content and undishonoured, and grant us in the end the gift of sleep." - Robert Louis Stevenson
(1850 – 1894) Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson - Scottish novelist, poet, essayist, and travel writer.
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[Quote No.53072] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Poem: about 'carpe diem' - seizing and making the most of today. It is sometimes used as a breakfast Grace]

'Salutation to the Dawn'

Look to this day!
For it is life, the very life of life.
In its brief course
Lie all the verities and realities of your existence:
The bliss of growth;
The glory of action;
The splendor of achievement;
For yesterday is but a dream,
And tomorrow is only a vision;
But today, well lived, makes every yesterday
a dream of happiness,
And every tomorrow a vision of hope.

" - Kalidasa
(born in the 4th century AD - died in the 5th century AD), his name means 'servant of Kali'. He was a Sanskrit poet and dramatist who lived in India and is widely regarded as the greatest poet and dramatist in the Sanskrit language.
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[Quote No.53508] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Saying grace:] We are truly grateful for: the food before us; the family beside us and; the love between us." - Unknown

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[Quote No.53564] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Poem: about what need to be happy. It is sometimes used when saying grace but then 'us' is used instead of 'me']

'A Prayer For Good Digestion and Happiness'

Give me [us] a good digestion, Lord, and also something to digest;
Give me [us] a healthy body, Lord, and sense to keep it at its best.
Give me [us] a healthy mind, good Lord, to keep the good and pure in sight,
Which, seeing sin, is not appalled, but finds a way to set it right.

Give me [us] a mind that is not bound, that does not whimper, whine or sigh.
Don't let me [us] worry overmuch about the fussy thing called I.
Give me [us] a sense of humor, Lord; give me [us] the grace to see a joke,
To get some happiness from life and pass it on to other folk.

" - Thomas Harry Basil Webb
(1898–1917), Second Lieutenant Thomas Harry Basil Webb 1st Battalion Welsh Guards, was Killed in Action in World War I, on 1 December 1917, aged 19.
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[Quote No.54680] Need Area: Food > Food
"The discovery of a new dish does more for human happiness than the discovery of a new star." - Jean Anthelme Brillat-Savarin
(1755 - 1826)
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[Quote No.57182] Need Area: Food > Food
"Often we eat when we are bored, tired, or tense, rather than really hungry. To overcome this bad habit, try to distract from and delay the urge to graze. When an urge hits, [drink a glass of water and] do something else for 5 to 10 minutes, then see if you still want to eat. Chances are, the urge will have faded, at least a little." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.57185] Need Area: Food > Food
"Keep unhealthy snacks out of sight - because when they, and other food, are out of sight they are more likely to be out of mind! Stash junk foods like candy and chips where you can't see them. You might eat less. When office workers kept chocolates on their desks, they ate 48% more than when the candies were 6 feet away. If they put chocolates in their desk drawers, they ate 25% less than if the sweet stuff was on their desks." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.57186] Need Area: Food > Food
"Eat slowly, and drink water. Take smaller bites. Chew your food slowly. Take a little more time between forkfuls. And drink water while you're eating. These simple steps are key if you want to cut back on calories and still feel full, research shows. " - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.57187] Need Area: Food > Food
"Use smaller bowls and plates:- The size of your dishes and utensils gives your brain cues about how much you're 'supposed' to eat -- and a bigger dish means more food. In one study, people at a Chinese buffet who got a large plate served themselves 52% more food, and ate 45% more, than those with smaller plates." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.58751] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, nutritious diet:] Like most people, I enjoy large servings of food without large calorie counts. That's why I 'super-size' my dishes using vegetables. What does this mean? I find the perfect veggie and cooking method to expand the portion, without compromising the taste or adding a lot of calories." - Lisa Lillien
a.k.a. Hungry Girl - best-selling author. [https://www.verywell.com/how-to-bulk-up-your-portion-sizes-with-veggies ] Refer also Volumetrics, a diet created by Barbara Rolls, PhD.
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[Quote No.58832] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Well chewed is half digested. [Chew your way to a slimmer you. Taking time to chew - 40 times per mouthful - means you eat less, eases pressure on your digestive system and increases your saliva, which contains enzymes needed to process carbohydrates.]" - Dr Harald Stossier
Quote from the best-selling book, 'The Viva Mayr Diet' by Dr Harald Stossier and Helena Frith Powell. [http://www.harpersbazaar.com.au/news/beauty-insider/2009/7/the-newest-crop-of-diet-books/ ]
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[Quote No.58863] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, natural diet:] An optimal diet for preventing disease is a whole-foods, plant-based diet that is naturally low in animal protein, harmful fats and refined carbohydrates. What that means in practice is little or no red meat [so the required protein is predominantly found in plants]; mostly vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and soy products in their natural [unrefined] forms; very few simple and refined carbohydrates such as sugar and white flour; and sufficient 'good fats' such as [Omega-3 fatty acids found in] fish oil or flax oil, seeds and nuts. A healthful diet should be low in 'bad fats,' meaning trans fats, [some] saturated fats and hydrogenated fats. Finally, we need more quality [of low calorie, high volume and nutrient density] and less quantity [of high calorie, low volume and nutrient density]." - Dean Ornish, MD
Founder and president, Preventive Medicine Research Institute and Clinical professor of medicine, University of California, San Francisco. [http://www.nytimes.com/2015/03/23/opinion/the-myth-of-high-protein-diets.html ]
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[Quote No.58867] Need Area: Food > Food
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Both the American Heart Association and the Pritikin Longevity Center recommend that nearly all Americans consume no more than 1,500 milligrams of sodium [salt] per day. It doesn’t really matter whether that sodium comes largely from plain old iodized table salt or from pricey Himalayan sea salt. If you exceed that 1,500-milligram daily level of sodium, it is likely to contribute to: Elevated blood pressure, Kidney stone formation, Osteoporosis, Atrophic gastritis (chronic inflammation of the stomach's lining), Acid reflux, Headaches, Senility, Strokes, Heart attacks, Heart failure, and Kidney failure." - pritikin.com
[https://www.pritikin.com/is-himalayan-salt-healthy ]
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[Quote No.58868] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, natural diet:] The paleo diet is based on emulating the diet of our hunter-gatherer ancestors [before the advent of agriculture - farming of crops and animals - and the development of industrial factory food production. Therefore...] It includes whole, unprocessed foods that resemble what they look like in nature. [So, in a nutshell,] ... Eat: Meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruits, nuts, seeds, herbs, spices, 'healthy' [saturated from meat and polyunsaturated i.e. omega-3 mostly from fish] fats and oils. [and] Avoid: Processed foods, sugar, soft drinks, grains, most dairy products, legumes [beans], artificial sweeteners, vegetable oils [polyunsaturated fats], margarine and trans fats. [Most other diets can be seen as a variation upon this theme. For example Nutrient density - Nutritarian diets are like paleo in what they eat and avoid but they add back the grains and legumes [for health and longevity benefits] and reduce the proportion of animal products, including swapping polyunsaturated fats for saturated fats [for cholesterol, heart disease and stroke avoidance]. Vegetarian diets also consume grains and legumes, but then they - for ethical and or health (research about cancer, cholesterol, heart disease, stroke avoidance, etc.) reasons - remove the red meat eating completely but still consume poultry, seafood, dairy and eggs, while lacto-ovo vegetarian diets remove all animal products except dairy and eggs while vegan diets are even stricter against animal products and won't eat even dairy or eggs, or any saturated fats from meat or polyunsaturated fat from fish. Then there are other diets, for example those that like paleo and Nutritarian avoid the bad (simple, refined, processed, sugar-like, high glycemic index, calorie-dense, nutrient-poor) carbohydrates which spike blood glucose levels and if extreme and frequent enough eventually cause insulin resistance and thereby obesity, metabolic syndrome and type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes, but differ in the types (saturated/unsaturated, etc), sources (meat/plant, etc) and proportion (10-50% of calories) of fat/oils encouraged. For example high (good) carb (low fat) diets or low (bad) carb (high fat) diets. [The low-carb, high-fat (LCHF) diet aims for roughly 50 percent of your calories from 'healthy' fats, 25 from 'good' carbs, and 25 from protein. The current government recommendation, for comparison, is 30 percent of calories from healthy fat, 50 to 60 percent from good carbs, and 10 to 20 from protein.] There are Ketogenic diets, that go to the extreme of removing most carbohydrates (everything other than the animal products and fats) -including many good carbs as well as bad - to get below 20-50g of carbs per day to get their bodies to go into ketogenesis. While this can reduce excess body fat, there is also research showing that reducing daily good carbs - fruit and vegetables - consumption correspondingly increases long-term population mortality rates.] " - Kris Gunnars, BSc
Published April, 2016. [https://authoritynutrition.com/paleo-diet-meal-plan-and-menu/ and https://www.pritikin.com/your-health/healthy-living/eating-right/539-want-to-live-to-be-100-eat-more-beans.html and https://www.pritikin.com/real-superfoods-diet ]
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[Quote No.58869] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, natural diet:] Calorie density diets allow people to eat more food by weight, volume and nutrients that is nutritious and satiating because it is low calorie. For example, eating an apple, where you're taking in only about 12 calories per bite, rather than eating a cookie, which is about 40 calories per bite. Another example would be that a whole pound of cooked fava beans is just 700 calories, while a pound of cashews is 2600 calories, nearly four times the calorie density. [Refer Nutritarian, Volumetric and Pritikin diets]" - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.58870] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, nutritious diet for active longevity: Eat more beans!] How to live to 100: A few years ago, scientists identified five groups of long-lived elderly people (aged 70 and older) – Japanese in Japan, Swedes in Sweden, Anglo-Celtic people in Australia, and Greeks in both Greece and Australia [refer 'Blue Zones']– and observed them for the next seven years, tracking their health status and food choices among nine different categories: vegetables, legumes, fruits, nuts, cereals, dairy products, meat, fish, and monounsaturated fats. A total of 785 elderly people were followed. ... The researchers found that legumes [beans] were the most important dietary predictor of survival among the elderly, 'regardless of their ethnicity,' they wrote [as reported in the 'Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition', 2004; 13 (S): S126]. For every 20-gram increase in daily legume intake (20 grams is about three-quarters of an ounce), 'there is a 7 to 8% reduction in mortality hazard ratio.' You'd be hard-pressed to find a more perfect food than beans. They are an excellent source of protein, vitamins, minerals, and complex carbohydrates. They're very low in fat and virtually sodium-free. Plus, they're filling [satiating]. And fiber? Even the lowest-fiber bean puts most other foods to shame. A cup of high-fiber beans, like pinto or black beans, tallies up 16 grams of fiber. You'd have to eat about eight slices of whole-wheat bread to get the same amount of fiber. And it's primarily cholesterol-reducing soluble fiber, which makes beans an excellent heart-healthy alternative to meat [which makes them so popular with the nutrition-conscious, vegetarians and vegans]. Bean prep these days has gotten so much easier, thanks to the ready availability of cans of already-cooked beans, and you can find many 'no salt added' varieties, which is really wonderful for keeping blood pressure under control. If all you can find is salted varieties, get rid of some of the salt by rinsing the beans through a colander. ... get more beans into your life ... Toss a handful of beans into your salads ... Stir beans into your pasta sauces or soups ... [etc.]" - pritikin.com
[Refer https://www.pritikin.com/your-health/healthy-living/eating-right/539-want-to-live-to-be-100-eat-more-beans.html and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Zone ]
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[Quote No.58871] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, nutritious diet for active longevity: Blue Zones!] Blue Zones is a concept used to identify a demographic and/or geographic area of the world where people live measurably longer lives. The concept grew out of demographic work done by Gianni Pes and Michel Poulain, who identified Sardinia's Nuoro province as the region with the highest concentration of male centenarians. As the two men zeroed in on the cluster of villages with the highest longevity, they drew concentric blue circles on the map and began referring to the area inside the circle as the Blue Zone. Dan Buettner identifies longevity hotspots in Okinawa (Japan); Sardinia (Italy); Nicoya (Costa Rica); Icaria (Greece); and among the Seventh-day Adventists in Loma Linda, California, and offers an explanation, based on empirical data and first hand observations, as to why these populations live healthier and longer lives. The five regions identified and discussed by Buettner in the book 'The Blue Zones: Lessons for Living Longer from the People Who've Lived the Longest': --- 1. Sardinia, Italy (particularly Nuoro province and Ogliastra): one team of demographers found a hot spot of longevity in mountain villages where men reach the age of 100 years at an amazing rate. --- 2. The islands of Okinawa, Japan: another team examined a group that is among the longest-lived on Earth. --- 3. Loma Linda, California: researchers studied a group of Seventh-day Adventists who rank among North America's longevity all-stars. --- 4. Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica: the peninsula was the subject of research on a Quest Network expedition which began on January 29, 2007. --- 5. Icaria, Greece: an April 2009 study on the island of Ikaria uncovered the location with the highest percentage of 90-year-olds on the planet – nearly 1 out of 3 people make it to their 90s. Furthermore, Ikarians 'have about 20 percent lower rates of cancer, 50 percent lower rates of heart disease and almost no dementia.' Residents of the first three places produce a high rate of centenarians, suffer a fraction of the diseases that commonly kill people in other parts of the developed world, and enjoy more healthy years of life. ... The people inhabiting Blue Zones share common lifestyle characteristics that contribute to their longevity. ... Buettner in his book provide a list of nine lessons, covering the lifestyle of blue zones people: - 1.Moderate, regular physical activity. - 2.Life purpose. - 3.Stress reduction. - 4.Moderate calories intake. - 5.Plant-based diet [Semi-vegetarianism – except for the Sardinian diet, the majority of food consumed is derived from plants]. - 6.Moderate alcohol intake, especially wine [Less smoking]. - 7.Engagement in spirituality or religion. - 8.Engagement in family life. - 9.Engagement in social life." - wikipedia.org
[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Blue_Zone and https://www.bluezones.com/live-longer/ and https://www.bluezones.com/blue-zones-solution-2/ ]
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[Quote No.58873] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, natural diet: the importance of vegetables and fruit for everyone not just vegetarians and vegans and a warning against prolonged ketogenic diets that avoid carbohydrates.] Just a few days ago, another major study [in the Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health] was published, a 12-year review, that once again validated the benefits of a daily menu full of fruits and veggies. Scientists from University College London found that a fruit-and-vegetable-rich diet was associated with a significant reduction in the risk of death from heart disease and cancer. In fact, the study found that the more vegetables and fruits we eat, the lower our risk of death from any cause and at any age. The study looked at the diets and health outcomes of 65,226 people representative of the British population from 2001 to 2013. The results showed that for people who ate seven or more servings of fruits and vegetables a day, their mortality rate was reduced by 42% compared to people eating less than one serving a day. Even Dr. Oyinlola Oyebode, the study’s lead investigator, was surprised by the results, and stated in a university press release: 'We all know that eating fruit and vegetables is healthy, but the size of the effect is staggering.' The study revealed that eating seven or more servings daily of fruits and vegetables reduced death by cancer by 25% and death by heart disease by 31%. The risk of death by any cause was reduced by 14% for those eating one to three servings of fruits and vegetables daily, by 29% for those consuming three to five portions, by 36% for those eating five to seven servings, and 42% for seven or more. The Pritikin Eating Plan recommends nine or more servings daily of fruits and vegetables. The large British study further showed that vegetables had the strongest correlation with a reduction in mortality rates. Each additional serving of vegetables lowered the mortality rate by 16%. Each additional portion of fruit reduced the rate by 4%. ... Finally, the newly published 12-year review warns that fruit juice has no beneficial effect and that canned fruits actually increase mortality rates, results that may be explained by the high levels of sugar in these forms of fruit. The negative health effects of the highly concentrated sugars in juices and the packing syrups in some canned fruits may negate the beneficial powers of fresh fruit, the authors reported." - pritikin.com
[Refer https://www.pritikin.com/real-superfoods-diet and http://jech.bmj.com/content/early/2014/03/03/jech-2013-203500″>Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health, 31 March 2014 DOI: 10.1136/jech-2013-203500 ]
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[Quote No.58874] Need Area: Food > Food
"[A healthy, natural diet: Keeping blood cholesterol low to avoid arteriosclerosis, heart disease and strokes, etc., by limiting or eliminating - like some vegetarians and whole food vegans - egg consumption (including eggs in baked goods like cakes) as well as red meat, cheese, and butter, processed foods, everything from margarine to frozen entrees, that contain ingredients like coconut oil, palm oil, and partially hydrogenated oils.] Are eggs healthy? Egg whites are. Egg yolks are not! Though eggs are packed with protein and nutrients, egg yolks are also packed with cholesterol, which research, described in this article, has shown can harm our hearts. Are eggs healthy? Do they raise cholesterol? Are eggs healthy? Is the dietary cholesterol from egg yolks harmless? Get the science-based facts from the nutrition experts at Pritikin. To help unscramble the truth, let's talk a bit more about cholesterol. When we hear the word 'cholesterol,' it usually refers to one of two things. There is dietary cholesterol, which is the cholesterol we eat. Egg yolks have the most dietary cholesterol of any food. With just one yolk [the egg's yellow centre], we're swallowing about 200 milligrams of dietary cholesterol. That's the amount the American Heart Association recommends most of us not exceed for the entire day. For optimal prevention against heart disease, the Pritikin Eating Plan recommends no more than 100 milligrams of dietary cholesterol a day [which is half the American Heart Association's Recommended Daily Allowance]. Blood, or serum, cholesterol is the amount of cholesterol in our blood. About 85% of the cholesterol in our blood comes from our liver. And here's a really important point: Our liver manufactures all the cholesterol our bodies need. About 15% of the cholesterol in our blood comes from the food we eat – yes, dietary cholesterol. Consistently, research has found that the more dietary cholesterol we eat, the higher our blood cholesterol levels rise, and the greater our risk of heart disease. That's why it's so important to keep a lid on the amount of cholesterol we eat. (Counsels Dr. Kenney: 'If you eliminate three egg yolks a day, you will likely lower your blood cholesterol at least 15%, on average, and improve the overall health of your arteries.') --- Saturated and Trans Fats: Now, it's certainly true that dietary cholesterol is not the only thing that raises blood cholesterol. Saturated and trans fats are spectacularly good at ratcheting up blood cholesterol levels. We get saturated and trans fat from foods like red meat, cheese, and butter, as well as from processed foods, everything from margarine to frozen entrees, that contain ingredients like coconut oil, palm oil, and partially hydrogenated oils. Let's get back to dietary cholesterol. For decades, scientific research has demonstrated that rising intake of egg yolks, rich in dietary cholesterol, contributes to rising blood cholesterol levels. --- One Egg A Day Can Raise Your Cholesterol: Just one extra egg a day can significantly raise your LDL cholesterol. [Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is one of the five major groups of lipoprotein. These groups, from least dense to most dense, are chylomicrons, very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL), intermediate-density lipoprotein (IDL), low-density lipoprotein and high-density lipoprotein (HDL). High LDL is considered bad, while high HDL is considered good.] Here is just a sampling of that research... --- Just One Extra Egg a Day: In a well-designed clinical study published in the leading medical journal The Lancet [Refer 1 below], researchers from Harvard Medical School studied the effects of adding just one extra-large egg a day to the regular diets of young, healthy men and women. All of them were lacto-vegetarians (vegetarians who also ate dairy products). That one daily jumbo egg increased the subjects' dietary cholesterol intake on average from 97 to 418 milligrams per day. After three weeks – just three weeks – blood cholesterol levels among the men and women had also shot up. Levels of LDL (bad) cholesterol rose on average 12%. 'Ingestion of egg seems selectively to raise cholesterol and protein in LDL particles in the plasma [blood] of free-living normal people,' lead author Frank M. Sacks, MD, and colleagues concluded. --- Egg Whites vs Whole Eggs [egg whites plus egg yolks]: In another study [Refer 2 below], a carefully controlled clinical trial published in 2006, researchers at the University of Sao Paulo in Brazil fed three egg whites daily to one group of healthy young men, and three whole eggs daily to another group of men, also young and healthy. The study lasted 15 days. Except for the egg variations, all the men were eating the exact same thing. Their meals, prepared daily by the university, were heart-healthy-style – fairly low in fat and high in a variety of whole foods like fruits, green vegetables, beans, chicken, and fish. --- Are Egg Whites Healthy? Do They Raise LDL Cholesterol? Among the men in the group eating three egg whites daily, total intake of dietary cholesterol averaged only 174 milligrams per day. Among the men eating three whole eggs a day (egg whites plus egg yolks) daily dietary cholesterol intake averaged a whopping 804 milligrams. --- More Eggs, Higher LDL: Along with increased dietary cholesterol, the egg yolk eaters ended up with increased blood cholesterol. Their LDL bad cholesterol, after 15 days of eating whole eggs, was about 30% higher compared to the egg white eaters. 'A high-cholesterol diet clearly enhances LDL levels,' wrote the authors. At the end of the study, the egg white eaters had average LDL levels of 86. The LDL levels of the whole egg eaters was 120. --- Chylomicrons: There was more troubling news. The scientists found that in addition to raising LDL cholesterol, the three-whole-eggs-a-day diet hindered the body's ability to clear out artery-clogging chylomicron remnants. Chylomicrons are particles, like LDL, that transport triglycerides and other fats to various cells throughout the body. Chylomicrons also absorb the dietary cholesterol we eat. Once chylomicrons start 'unloading' their cargo, they become chylomicron remnants, which are taken up by the liver and discarded from the body. But if these chylomicrons remnants are stuffed with dietary cholesterol and fats, they tend to 'hang around' in our bodies longer, taking up residence in our artery walls, just as LDL cholesterol does, where they can wreak havoc. And sure enough, the Brazilian study found that eating three egg yolks daily 'increased the residence time of chylomicron remnants, which may have undesirable effects related to the development of coronary artery disease,' the scientists wrote. Recent research has bolstered concerns about chylomicron remnants. --- Fouling Up HDL: 'The cholesterol from these chylomicron remnants can also be passed to HDL particles, and that's potentially a big problem,' points out Dr. Jay Kenney, Nutrition Research Specialist at the Pritikin Longevity Center. 'It can contribute to the conversion of HDL from 'good' to 'bad' cholesterol, from being anti-inflammatory to pro-inflammatory. And no longer is HDL doing its job of transporting cholesterol out of the artery walls and back to the liver for disposal.' --- Lower LDL Cholesterol Naturally: 'Unfortunately,' continues Dr. Kenney, 'many physicians don't pay attention to chylomicrons, and ignore their role in promoting coronary artery disease, or atherosclerosis. That's troubling, especially since doctors' key strategy for fighting heart disease – prescribing statins – does little to reduce the formation of chylomicrons or the amount of chylomicron remnants burrowing into the artery wall and damaging arteries.' The good news is that an optimal heart-health food and fitness plan like the Pritikin Program does appear to reduce chylomicron activity, 'which may help explain why lifestyle programs like Pritikin can reverse atherosclerosis better than statins,' notes Dr. Kenney. --- Plaque Build-Up: Another study [Refer 3 below] documenting the dangers of egg yolks was published in 2012 by scientists at the Stroke Prevention and Atherosclerosis Research Centre in Ontario, Canada. The researchers looked at more than 1,200 people, average age 61, who already had artery disease, asking them about their daily diets and any other cardiovascular risk factors they might have, including smoking. Then, using carotid ultrasound imaging, the researchers found that those people who ate the most whole eggs had the most plaque-ridden arteries. The scientists also noted that the people who had eaten the most eggs over the years had even more plaque build-up than those with the highest cholesterol levels or body weights. The egg industry must have been concerned about consumer reaction to this new study because immediately after its online publication, doctors affiliated with the industry shot out press statements criticizing the study, pointing out, for example, that the subjects with the higher egg intakes also tended to be heavy smokers. 'Nice spin,' smiles Dr. Kenney, 'but these press statements failed to mention that the Canadian scientists had in fact looked for a statistically significant correlation between egg yolk consumption and smoking history. They found none.' --- Bottom Line: Counsels Dr. Kenney: 'If you eliminate three egg yolks a day, which is about 600 milligrams of dietary cholesterol, you will likely lower your blood cholesterol at least 15%, on average, and improve the overall health of your arteries. That's very good news for your heart.' Do enjoy egg whites. [For example...] Breakfast at the Pritikin Longevity Center includes a big, beautiful egg-white-omelet bar full of fresh, colorful additions like salsa, green onions, nonfat ricotta cheese, and roasted red peppers. But steer clear of egg yolks most of the time, if not all. What the egg industry describes as 'nature's perfect food' is not perfect for your arteries. What is perfect is a lifestyle program like Pritikin that substantially limits saturated and trans fats as well as dietary cholesterol, and promotes an eating plan full of whole, fiber-rich foods, plus daily exercise. --- Sources: - 1 The Lancet, 1984; 323: 674. - 2 The Journal of Nutrition, 2006; 136 (4): 971. - 3 Atherosclerosis, 2012; 224 (2): 469. " - pritikin.com
[Refer https://www.pritikin.com/your-health/healthy-living/eating-right/1704-are-eggs-healthy.html and https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-density_lipoprotein
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