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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.46608] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Six pounds of fat takes up almost a gallon of space in volume!" - Michael R. Eades. M.D. and Mary Dan Eades, M.D.
Quote from their book, ‘Staying Power - Maintaining Your Low-Carb Weight Loss for Good’, (2005).
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[Quote No.46609] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Create a personal mantra to tide you over during times of temptation. Repeating ‘Yes I can. Yes I will. This is really no big deal.’ or something that suits your mind-set will assist you in bringing your focus back to your success." - Michael R. Eades. M.D. and Mary Dan Eades, M.D.
Quote from their book, ‘Staying Power - Maintaining Your Low-Carb Weight Loss for Good’, (2005).
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[Quote No.46610] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] We are shaped and fashioned by what we love." - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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[Quote No.46611] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Ponder the when, what, and why of your eating. When the urge to eat is upon you, stop and think. Try - to figure out if you eat because you are angry, afraid, sad, lonesome, tired, or for any reason other than hunger. Then you can formulate a strategy to combat the real reason or at least be aware and override the urge." - Michael R. Eades. M.D. and Mary Dan Eades, M.D.
Quote from their book, ‘Staying Power - Maintaining Your Low-Carb Weight Loss for Good’, (2005).
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[Quote No.46693] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Low-glycemic diet: A low-glycemic diet is a weight loss diet based on controlling blood sugar. One example is the Glycemic Index Diet developed by David J. Jenkins, a professor of nutrition at the University of Toronto and later turned into a successful line of diet books by author and former president of the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, Rick Gallop. According to the publishing company Virgin Books, the G.I. Diet has sold over two million copies. G.I. stands for Glycemic Index, one of several metrics used to quantify short-term changes in blood glucose levels in humans following the ingestion of carbohydrate-containing foods [therefore why this type of diet is considered a type of low-carb diet or more accurately a low-bad-carb diet]. Glucose is the body's source of energy — it is the fuel that feeds your brain, muscles, and other organs. Glucose is set at 100, and all foods are indexed against that number. So foods that are quickly digested have a high G.I., and foods that are digested more slowly have a lower G.I. Any food rating less than 55 in the G.I. is considered low. The glycemic index is a useful aid for diabetics or for anyone who wishes to control their blood glucose levels. A diet based on foods with low glycemic response has been associated with diabetes management, improved blood lipids (cholesterol), reduced risk of heart disease, and weight management. Not only will foods with a low glycemic index take longer to digest (therefore prolonging satiety) they will also maintain blood glucose levels at a relatively constant state. Foods with a high glycemic index not only digest quickly, they can cause extreme fluctuations in blood glucose. There are some specific factors to look for in foods that can indicate their glycemic index: Low glycemic foods contain: Fat, Whole grains, Protein, Raw Starches, legumes, vegetables, fruits and dairy products. High Glycemic Foods contain: Refined grains, refined sugars, increased amylopectin: amylose ratio, and often high sugar fruits have a high glycemic index. There are other factors that contribute to a foods glycemic index, such as plant variety, food processing, cooking method and whether the food is eaten by itself or in combination with other foods. There are criticisms of the glycemic index, including how impractical it is. Few foods have been tested for their glycemic index, and the preparation and combination with other foods can alter its glycemic index. There is no requirement to display the glycemic index of a food product, and it is not always easy to predict the glycemic index of certain foods. Switching from a high glycemic index diet to a low glycemic index diet can be made relatively easy. Switching white bread and pastas to whole grain, eating breakfast cereals made from oats, bran or barley, adding more fruits and vegetables when cooking and reducing potato consumption can all aid in lowering glycemic index." - Wikipedia.org
[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Low-glycemic_diet ]
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[Quote No.46694] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] The Glycemic Index Diet (Low-Glycemic Diet): The glycemic index has been a popular weight loss tool to help dieters lose weight. Also referred to as the glycemic index diet, GI diet, and low glycemic diet, it is the basis for many popular diet plans, such as South Beach, Nutrisystem, The Zone, Sugar Busters, Glucose Revolution, and Ending the Food Fight. The glycemic index measures carbohydrates. The index is a list of how blood sugar levels rise after you eat a small portion of a carbohydrate food. Originally, the index was developed as a tool to help diabetics manage blood sugar control. In theory, if it works to help control blood sugar in diabetic people, then it should work for weight control. ---------What Is The Glycemic Index? All carbohydrates increase blood sugar levels, but the effect varies widely. For example, a glass of orange juice will cause a much quicker rise in blood sugar than a bowl of oatmeal, which takes longer because of the type of carbohydrate and amount of fiber. The response is affected by many factors, including the quantity of food, the amount and type of carbohydrate, the cooking method, degree of processing, and more. On the glycemic index scale, each food is assigned an index number from 1-100, with 100 as the reference score for pure glucose. Typically, foods are rated high (greater than 70), moderate (56-69), or low (less than 55). ---------Quality Carbs Promote Weight Loss: Using the glycemic index (GI) in diet plans is based on the concept that low-glycemic [ie ‘good carbs’] foods are more satisfying than high-glycemic [ie ‘bad carb’] foods. Low-GI foods take longer to absorb and help dieters feel full longer, so they are less likely to overeat. High-GI foods break down faster, leaving you hungry and less satisfied. Most, but not all, foods on the lower end of the GI scale tend to be healthier, nutrient-rich, less processed, and higher in fiber -- such as whole fruits, vegetables, grains, and beans. Foods high in fiber can be very filling, especially when paired with protein. ‘When you focus on choosing low-GI carbs along with lean protein and healthy fats [unsaturated rather than saturated or trans-fats], you will naturally crowd out many of the less nutritious, high GI foods and lose weight,’ says David Ludwig, MD, PhD, founder of the Optimal Weight for Life program (OWL) at Children's Hospital Boston. He has used the GI plan successfully for years with his patients. In research published in the March 1, 1999 issue of ‘Pediatrics’, Ludwig and colleagues found that foods with lower GI scores seemed to reduce hunger in obese teenage boys. Whereas the higher GI foods ‘trigger a rise in blood sugar, followed by a cascade of hormonal changes, which tend to make you hungry again sooner because they are metabolized quicker than low-GI foods,’ says Ludwig, author of ‘Ending the Food Fight’, a weight loss book using the glycemic index. ---------More Benefits? Some studies have shown weight management and disease prevention benefits from using the glycemic index. ‘Using the GI to improve carb quality [‘good’ rather than ‘bad’ carbs] can improve overall healthfulness of diets, promote weight loss, weight maintenance, and reduce the risk of chronic diseases,’ Ludwig says. In 2010, a study published in the ‘New England Journal of Medicine’ found the GI, in combination with higher protein, helped overweight adults in eight European countries maintain their weight. However, the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans states that ‘consistent evidence shows that glycemic index and/or glycemic load are not associated with body weight and do not lead to greater weight loss or better weight maintenance. A 2008 report, which analyzed data from 37 studies and was published in the’ American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’, linked low-GI diets to lower risk of heart disease, diabetes, and some cancers. However, that does not prove that the low-GI diets prevented those diseases. ---------Glycemic Index Controversy: The GI is not a perfect tool and is no guarantee of healthy fare. Brown and white rice rank comparably on the index scale as do white and whole wheat bread, yet clearly the whole grain choices are healthier. Some scores are confusing. For example, carrots are a nutrient-rich, high-fiber vegetable that can range from low to high on the GI scale. Likewise, some candy that includes nuts gets a better GI score than a potato. Ripe bananas have higher GI scores than under-ripe bananas. Cook pasta al dente and it ranks lower than fully cooked pasta. Not only do the food scores vary, but so does the response from person to person. It can even vary within the same person from day to day, according to research reported in the June 2007 issue of ‘Diabetes Care’. Furthermore, no one eats a single food in isolation. When carbs are paired with other foods, it impacts how blood sugars are affected -- that's the glycemic load, which ranks foods based on carbs and portion size. Some nutrition experts don’t put much stock in the GI as an effective weight loss tool because of all the variability associated with the numbers. ‘Using the GI to lose weight is unnecessarily complicated, and it does not simplify the task of choosing healthier food to lose weight or manage blood sugar,’ says Hope Warshaw, MMSc, RD, a certified diabetes educator and author of books about diabetes including ‘Diabetes Meal Planning Made Easy’. Some experts see the glycemic index as just another gimmick because there is little evidence that an elevated blood sugar level leads to weight gain if you are healthy. ---------How to Choose Healthier Carb: ‘Look at the bigger picture. Use the GI scale to choose quality carbs that are healthy, natural, whole, and in the least processed state,’ Ludwig says. In general, all whole fruits and vegetables are healthy carbs, even if some are a little higher in natural sugars [ie fructose] than others. When trying to find the best quality carbs using the food label, Harvard researcher Dariush Mozaffarian, MD, recommends looking for carbs that are the least processed, whole grain, and contain plenty of fiber. Another approach, Mozaffarian says, is to look at the ratio of total carbohydrates to dietary fiber per serving. This figure includes sugars, and when the ratio is 10:1 or more, keep looking until you find one that is less than 5:1 [so the carbohydrates have more fiber and therefore will probably be absorbed slower and therefore be lower G.I.]. If that is too complicated, try following the guidance from ‘My Plate’, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's dietary guidelines, which will help you make healthier choices. That includes filling half your plate with vegetables and fruits, and the other half with grains and proteins. ‘It is better to focus on eating an overall healthier diet (fruits, vegetables, beans, whole grains, healthy fats, lean protein, low-fat dairy, nuts), increase fiber intake, and decrease processed foods,’ Warshaw says. ---------Bottom Line: There is no such thing as one-size-fits-all for weight control. And no single factor defines the perfect nutritional diet. If you don't get too hung up on the numbers and use common sense to select healthy, less processed, wholesome carbs, a glycemic index diet can help you choose healthier carbs. Keep in mind that you must also control portion sizes and total calories, and get regular physical activity. Any diet you can stick with long term is the right one for you. ‘Make healthy food choices that you can live with forever because there really is no value in going on a diet plan for two weeks if you can’t sustain it,’ Warshaw says. Further research is needed to reach consensus on whether the glycemic index works as a long-term weight loss plan." - Kathleen Zelman, MPH, RD
She is director of nutrition for WebMD. Her opinions and conclusions are her own. [http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/glycemic-index-diet ]
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[Quote No.46695] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Get excited about eating food that tastes good and is good for you." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.46700] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Cur­rent rec­om­men­da­tions sug­gest that a brain-healthy life style should include at least bal­anced nutri­tion, stress man­age­ment, phys­i­cal exer­cise, and brain exercise [men­tal stimulation]... It is also impor­tant to main­tain emo­tional con­nec­tions. Not only with our­selves, to have self-confidence and self-esteem, but also with our fam­ily our friends. Sleep and over­all health con­di­tions are other fac­tors that also mat­ter." - sharpbrains.com
Quote from 'The Sharp­Brains Guide to Brain Fit­ness'. [http://sharpbrains.com/blog/2011/12/06/top-10-quotes-on-lifelong-neuroplasticity-neurogenesis-and-brain-fitness-and-a-call-to-ebook-readers/ ]
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[Quote No.46704] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] In order to improve your health and how you feel surely it is worthwhile to 'put your money where your mouth is?' It would be a foolish, false economy to do otherwise because of the eventual financial, physical, emotional and social costs of getting sick." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.46705] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Just as you can eat your way to sickness, you can eat your way to health. The choice is yours." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.46706] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Aging Well: Eating Right for Longevity. Is your diet the key to longevity? Find out why eating right just may mean aging right, too. Aging: everyone does it, yet some people seem relatively unaffected by getting older. Could good nutrition be the key to a healthier, longer life? -----------Does Aging Equal Illness? ‘Aging is often associated with the development of one or more chronic diseases, but it doesn't have to be that way,’ says Jeffrey Blumberg, PhD, professor at the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University. It's not always just a matter of time before you have a heart attack or stroke, get type 2 diabetes or cancer, break a hip because of osteoporosis, or develop Alzheimer's, even though these conditions are often associated with aging, Blumberg says. Your risk for disease and disability increases with inadequate physical activity, genetic susceptibility, and poor diet. -----------Aging: Defy It With Diet: So what's the best eating plan for preventing, delay, or minimizing the conditions associated with aging, including inflamed joints, flagging memory, and failing eyesight? ‘The most beneficial diets rely heavily on fresh vegetables, fruits, and legumes -- foods that are naturally lower in calories and packed with nutrients,’ says Bradley Willcox, MD, MPH, co-author of ‘The Okinawa Diet Plan’ and professor of geriatrics at the University of Hawaii. Experts suspect the antioxidant compounds found in produce, legumes, and whole grains are largely responsible for holding back the march of time. Antioxidants, such as vitamins C and E, and other compounds, including polyphenols and anthocyanins, battle free radicals -- unstable forms of oxygen that damage cell function. Free radicals form from normal metabolism. Your body also produces them in response to strong ultraviolet rays from the sun; air pollution; smoking; and secondhand smoke. The buildup of free radicals contributes to the aging process and to the development of a number of age-related diseases such as cancer, heart disease, and inflammatory conditions, including osteoarthritis. What's worse, aging increases free radical production. That means your diet should be healthier than ever with the passage of time. The question, of course, is how do we do that? -----------Anti-Aging Nutrition: Antioxidants generate a lot of buzz when it comes to longevity, but aging well takes more. You must optimize a myriad of beneficial nutrients, including protein, calcium, and vitamin D, and minimize detrimental dietary components including saturated and trans fats. While none of these foods is the ‘Fountain of Youth,’ including them on a regular basis as part of a balanced diet can reduce the toll time takes on your body. -----------Nuts: Nuts are cholesterol-free protein sources, and are worthy substitutes for fatty meats. Research published in the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’ found that in a group of nearly 35,000 women, those who ate foods rich in vitamin E, including nuts, lowered their risk of having a stroke. Top picks: Almonds for their high vitamin E levels; pecans, for their antioxidants; and walnuts, for omega-3s. Tips: --Top breakfast cereals, yogurt, salads, and cooked vegetables with an ounce of chopped nuts. --Snack on an ounce of whole almonds (about 24) for almost half the vitamin E you need for the day. --Enjoy a nut butter sandwich on whole-grain bread. --Concoct a smoothie by blending a medium frozen banana, 1/2 cup plain fat-free yogurt, 1/4 cup chopped walnuts, and 2 teaspoons sugar (optional). -----------Fish: According to the American Heart Association, fish harbors omega-3 fats that reduce the risk of plaque buildup in your arteries; decrease blood triglyceride (fat) levels; help lower blood pressure; and lessen the odds of sudden death. Fish is a wise protein choice because of its relatively low saturated fat and cholesterol content. Top picks: Salmon, sardines, and canned tuna are among the fish with the highest levels of omega-3 fatty acids. Tips: --Have at least two fish meals a week instead of fatty meats. --Add canned light tuna or canned salmon to salads instead of chicken or cheese. -----------Olive Oil: Olive oil is rich in heart-healthy monounsaturated fats and beneficial plant compounds. It's also free of the trans fats found in some margarines and other processed foods, and that's a good thing. A study published in the journal ‘Neurology’ found that among healthy people 65 and older, the higher the saturated and trans fat intake, the greater the cognitive decline during a six-year period. Top pick: The extra virgin variety. A recent report in the ‘Annals of Internal Medicine’ found extra-virgin olive oil more beneficial than other types for increasing the high-density lipoprotein levels (HDL or good cholesterol) in men. Extra-virgin olive oil also offers beneficial levels of oleocanthal, a compound that mimics the effects of anti-inflammatory medications including aspirin and ibuprofen. Tips: It's good for you, but don't go overboard; olive oil is caloric. Limit total oil consumption to 7 teaspoons daily (assuming all of the added fat you use is from olive oil) on a 2,000-calorie diet; 5 for a 1,600-calorie plan. --Make salad dressing with one part olive oil and three parts balsamic vinegar. --Choose olive oil instead of butter or margarine. --Lightly coat chopped broccoli, sweet or white potato, or carrots with olive oil and roast on a baking sheet at 400 degrees until done. -----------Fruits and Vegetables: Produce provides fiber, vitamins, and minerals, as well as hundreds of anti-aging phytonutrients. When it comes to age-defying properties, some produce is better than others, according to the United States Department of Agriculture's tests for antioxidant activity. Still, any fruit and vegetable is better than none. People who take in the most produce -- upwards of 10 servings a day -- have higher levels of antioxidants in their bloodstream, which probably translates to better aging. Produce-lovers also have stronger bones, thanks to the magnesium and potassium that fruits and vegetables supply (dark greens are also rich in vitamin K, necessary to bolster bones). Fruit: Blueberries, cranberries, blackberries, raspberries, strawberries, apples, and cherries. Vegetables: Kale, spinach, broccoli, artichokes, avocado, asparagus, cauliflower, sweet potato, carrots, pumpkin, and onions. Tips: --Include berries at least once daily on top of breakfast cereals, in smoothies or salads, or snack on them as is. --Add dried cranberries or cherries to cooked whole grains. --Make a quick guacamole by mixing a ripe avocado and large, diced tomato with 1 tablespoon each of olive oil, fresh chopped cilantro leaves, and finely chopped onions. --Prepare a pumpkin smoothie with 1 cup canned pumpkin, 1/2 cup low-fat milk, and ground cinnamon and sugar to taste. Heat the remainder of the can as a side dish. Add chopped frozen kale or spinach to soups and pasta dishes. -----------Legumes: Legumes are packed with complex carbohydrates and fiber to ensure steadier blood glucose and insulin levels, and they provide a cholesterol-free source of protein. Legumes are also packed with antioxidants. Top picks: From black beans to soy beans, they're all good for you. Tips: --Add beans to soups, salad, egg and pasta dishes --Puree cooked beans (includes canned) and add to soups or stews --Snack on bean dips and fresh vegetables or whole grain crackers --Munch roasted soy nuts or thawed edamame (green soy beans) -Substitute firm tofu for meat in vegetable stir-fry dishes -----------Whole Grains: Whole grains retain more of their natural nutrients, particularly age-defying vitamin E, fiber, and B vitamins, than refined varieties. They are also a wealth of antioxidant compounds. Top picks: Quinoa, millet, barley, oatmeal, whole-wheat pasta, cracked wheat, wild rice. Tips: --Wrap sandwiches in whole-wheat tortillas instead of white --Choose whole-grain cereal for breakfast and snacks --Try wild or brown rice or whole-wheat pasta --Add leftover cooked whole grains to soups -----------Low-Fat Dairy: Dairy foods are excellent sources of bone-strengthening calcium. They also supply protein that bolsters bones and muscle, and is needed for peak immune function. Top picks: Milk, either 1% low-fat or fat-free. Milk is fortified with vitamin D, necessary for calcium absorption. Adequate levels of vitamin D may reduce prostate, colon, and breast cancer. Tips: --Sip café au lait or cappuccino made from decaffeinated coffee and fat-free milk --Make mashed potatoes with fat-free evaporated milk --Enjoy a smoothie made with milk, berries, and crushed ice --Indulge a chocolate craving with fat-free chocolate milk -----------Fight Fat, Live Longer? It's not only what you eat when it comes to stalling the aging process. Calories count, too. ‘Being overweight stresses your heart, blood vessels, and joints, accelerating age-related diseases,’ says Willcox. Excess body fat also plays a role in the development of dementia, certain cancers, and eye diseases, including cataracts and age-related macular degeneration. Cutting a few hundred calories a day from your regular eating plan may be all it takes to make it into your 80s or 90s in relatively good health. That's what Willcox and his colleagues found when they related eating habits to death rates among 2,000 nonsmoking men. In his study, the men who consumed an average of 1,900 calories per day -- about 15% below the average for the entire group -- were less likely to die over the 36-year study period. Nobody knows exactly how a lower calorie diet works to lengthen life. Perhaps the secret lies in a slower metabolism that comes with eating less food. A reduced metabolic rate means your body produces fewer free radicals. Calorie reduction plans also lower the body's core temperature and insulin levels, two indicators of longevity. A recent study in the ‘Journal of the American Medical Association’ found that overweight people who cut their daily calorie intake by up to 25% were more likely to have a lower core body temperature and normal fasting levels of insulin in their blood. [For more information about increasing longevity by reducing calories, search the internet using the term ‘caloric restriction with optimal nutrition’. Adherents to this lifestyle call themselves CRONies (for calorie-restricted optimal nutrition).] Aging: We're all doing it. Perhaps combining a diet rich in ‘anti-aging’ foods with fewer calories overall may help us do it better - and live longer." - Elizabeth M. Ward, MS, RD
[http://www.webmd.com/healthy-aging/features/aging-well-eating-right-for-longevity ]
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[Quote No.46707] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] In order to address a current cocktail of health threats, Americans must alter their diets and do so radically. Those alterations must begin with a dramatic reduction in the consumption of sugars." - Alec Baldwin

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[Quote No.46708] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] An Overview of The Atkins Diet [a very well-known low-carb diet]: The Atkins Diet is a popular diet that focuses on reducing carb-intake in favor of consuming more protein-rich foods. It requires stringent attention to the amount of carbohydrate in the diet, particularly during the first few weeks. The following is an overview of the Atkins Diet: ----The Basics of the Atkins Diet: The core concept of The Atkins Diet is Dr. Atkins' theory that over-consumption of and hypersensitivity to carbohydrates is at the root of weight-gain. The principle Atkins bases his plan on says that it is the way your body processes the carbohydrates you eat - not how much fat you eat - that causes us to have a weight problem. Dr. Atkins [a cardiologist] says that many overweight people may be insulin resistant - the cells that convert carbohydrates into glucose (which becomes energy) do not work correctly. Atkins suggests it is more likely than not that most overweight people are in fact insulin resistant. Dr. Atkins' remedy to insulin resistance (or simple over-consumption of carbohydrates) is strict carbohydrate restriction. In order to follow the Atkins plan, you must begin monitoring and controlling your carbohydrate-intake. There are specific foods that are allowed and not allowed during certain portions of the plan. In particular, you must refrain from eating 'bad' carbs such as [sugar, flour] processed, pre-packaged foods and junk foods like cookies in favor of a protein-rich diet. ----How Does the Atkins Diet Work? By reducing your carbohydrate-intake to less than 40 grams a day, you will enter a bodily process called ketosis. Ketosis is a state in which your body burns fat as fuel. Dr. Atkins also says that ketosis will affect insulin production, which will prevent more fat from being formed. Dr. Atkins says once you enter ketosis and your body begins efficiently using fat as fuel, your cravings for carbs will subside and you won't miss the foods you are doing without. ----The Phases and the Food: The Atkins Diet consists of the following four stages: induction, ongoing weight loss, pre-maintenance and maintenance. Induction is the first 14 days of the plan, during which Atkins says you can lose up to 15 pounds. This rapid weight loss can be attributed to limiting carb-intake to 20 grams a day. The only carbs allowed during Induction are low-carb vegetables like lettuce, broccoli and tomatoes. (You are limited to three cups per day.) You must eliminate a number of other foods as well, including some that are considered otherwise healthy, such as yogurt, fruit and starchy vegetables (like potatoes). A number of beverages are off-limits during induction, too. During the next stage - ongoing weight loss - you can increase your carb intake by five grams, but you will eventually hit a plateau and will need to limit your carb intake once again. During pre-maintenance, your rate of weight-loss will slow down. You will then be able to 'test' certain foods to see if you can safely add them to your diet without weight-gain resulting. Once you reach your goal weight, you enter maintenance and may introduce more carbs back into your diet, but not the 'bad' [i.e. High glycemic index] ones, as they will result in weight-regain. You will need to choose healthy carbs [i.e. low and medium glycemic index ones] instead of refined carbs (like white bread) from now on. If you do gain weight, you can restart the plan again at any time." - Jennifer R. Scott
Refer 'Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution' book [http://weightloss.about.com/od/theatkinsdiet/a/atkinsoverview.htm ].
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[Quote No.46710] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Bad [foolish] men live that they may eat and drink, whereas good [wise] men eat and drink that they may live." - Socrates

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[Quote No.46724] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Our diet and lifestyle has a direct effect on our endocrine system. Our hormone regulation can change based on what we choose to eat and how we choose to live. Leptin and insulin are two powerful hormones that influence how energy is metabolized throughout the body. Exercise has been shown to increase sensitivity to both leptin and insulin, which is an important part of maintaining healthy homeostasis and natural energy regulation. ----About Leptin and Insulin: Leptin and insulin are the master hormones when it comes to weight control. Leptin, in particular, signals the brain to store or burn fat. Leptin is used by the body to regulate energy use through metabolism and appetite. Fasting or consuming too few calories on a regular basis can lower sensitivity to leptin, which leads to increased hunger, cravings and lack of energy. Along with leptin, insulin is another hormone that regulates how fat is used or stored in the body. When the body is sensitive to the actions of these hormones, natural homeostasis exists and weight is naturally regulated. However, cells in the body can become resistant to leptin and insulin. When this happens, the body requires higher and higher levels of these hormones to get across the proper signals. This often leads to a distorted appetite, poor energy levels, and unwanted fat gain. In the long term, it can also increase your risk for developing metabolic conditions like diabetes and heart disease. -----Exercise Improves Leptin and Insulin Sensitively: For years, research has shown that the benefits of exercise far exceed a simple equation of calories burned during activity. Exercise appears to have a powerful influence on our neurotransmitter and hormone levels, and what exercise you choose can determine how your body responds. Exercise and movement in general have a positive effect on leptin and insulin sensitivity. A study at the University of Florida has shown that modest exercise allows leptin to work properly, thereby reducing weight gain. Many experts believe that interval training in particular has a strong impact on the regulation of hormones like leptin and insulin. Short bursts of vigorous exercise interspersed throughout a moderate level workout appear to have long term positive effects on how these two key metabolic hormones are used in the body. Small studies have demonstrated that this type of exercise may in fact be the most effective both for fat loss and muscle growth. Simply starting with a walking program with intervals should kick-start one's leptin and insulin switches into their proper mode. As these hormones begin operating more efficiently, energy and appetite are better regulated, making good health easier than ever to achieve." - Elizabeth Walling
a freelance writer specializing in health and nutrition. [http://www.naturalnews.com/031459_leptin_insulin.html]
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[Quote No.46725] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Low Leptin Levels Increase Risk of Age-Related Mental Decline: Researchers at Boston University School of Medicine recently discovered that individuals with lower levels of circulating leptin had an increased risk of dementia and Alzheimer's Disease (AD). Leptin, a hormone produced by the visceral and subcutaneous adipose (fat) tissue, is critical in regulating caloric intake and fat stores. As calories are consumed this powerful hormone is secreted into the circulatory system where it makes its way up to the hypothalamus. The hypothalamus contains specialized receptors within the metabolic control center that respond to leptin. Leptin's effect is to cause feelings of satiety [feeling full and reducing appetite] and to increase energy expenditure, particularly from stored body fat. Chronic inflammation from dietary stress, heavy metal toxicity, or environmental pollutants can damage the hypothalamaic leptin receptors, causing a condition called leptin resistance. Leptin resistance is characterized by an inability for the hypothalamus to respond to high circulating insulin levels. This causes increased appetite and weight gain. The new study suggests that leptin plays an important role in the hippocampus, a critical area that functions to facilitate memory processes. Results of the study showed that individuals with the highest levels of leptin had a 6% risk of developing AD [Alzheimer's Disease] during 12 years compared with a 25% risk for those with the lowest leptin levels. 'It's interesting and exciting because it's a new pathway that was not previously suspected to be directly involved in AD [Alzheimer's Disease] in humans,' said lead author Sudha Seshadri, MD, associate professor of neurology, Boston University School of Medicine in Massachusetts. Leptin is known to play a critical role in energy metabolism and has also been shown to stimulate angiogenesis (arterial formation). It is through this mechanism, by stimulating the hippocampus and increasing blood supply, that many believe the study results were produced. This new pathway gives us a better understanding of some of the key mechanisms behind age related memory loss and the increase in these conditions over the last 20 years. Leptin levels are influenced heavily by diet and lifestyle, which thus far have been relatively ignored by mainstream medicine. For example, several studies have shown that high fructose intake causes leptin resistance and elevated triglycerides in rats. High fructose corn syrup is virtually ubiquitous in the processed foods that make up much of the American diet. -----Balance Leptin Levels Naturally: --1. Reduce sugar and grain consumption: Sugar, high fructose corn syrup and heavy doses of grains such as wheat, oats, rice, and starchy vegetables will increase leptin resistance, while also limiting the body's ability to stimulate leptin release. --2. Avoid High Omega 6 fats and Trans-Fats: These fats inflame the body. --3. Healing Diet: Build your meals around non-starchy vegetables and healthy fats such as avocados, extra-virgin coconut and olive oils, grass-fed meat and free-range eggs, almonds, brazil nuts, pecans, walnuts, hemp, flax, and chia seeds. --4. Train For Maximal Fat Burning: High intensity exercise for short duration stimulates large secretions of human growth hormone, which enhances fat burning mechanisms and helps to modulate leptin levels. --5. Sleep Well: Leptin levels typically rise during sleep. Studies have shown that sleep deprivation decreases circulating leptin levels and leads to insensitivity, over-eating, weight-gain and mental decline. Best to eat 3-4 hours before bed and be in bed for sure by 11pm." - Dr. David Jockers
[http://www.naturalnews.com/027812_leptin_mental_decline.html ]
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[Quote No.46758] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] If cravings [for unhealthy foods or drinks]... kick in, distracting yourself for as little as 10-15 minutes – for example, by phoning a friend, going for a walk, having a bath or surfing the Net – often works to curb the desire..." - Juliette Kellow BSc RD
Dietitian [http://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/diet/seven-deadly-diet-sins.htm ]
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[Quote No.46760] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] More than half of all 25-44 year old women in the UK [in 2013] are overweight or obese [with body mass indexes over 25 if overweight and over 30 if obese when between 20 and 25 is healthy], rising to more than 60 percent of 45 to 54 year olds." - Juliette Kellow BSc RD
Dietitian http://www.weightlossresources.co.uk/diet/seven-deadly-diet-sins.htm ]
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[Quote No.46761] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Our Pleistocene ancestors KNEW they were living in a dangerous place. Today, we are like lambs to the slaughter. The average supermarket is just as dangerous a place to find food as the savannahs of East Africa. We need to be just as skilful as our ancestors in making wise choices." - Geoff Bond
Quote from his book, 'Natural Eating: Nutritional Anthropology - Eating in Harmony with our Genetic Programming'. [Refer http://www.naturaleater.com/ ]
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[Quote No.46795] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: The three macronutrient types we eat are protein, fats and carbohydrates but...] There is no dietary requirement for carbohydrates since the body can make them from the protein you consume (through a process in the liver known as gluconeogenesis)." - Jimmy Moore
Famous and popular low-carb diet podcaster from the 'Livin' La Vida Low-Carb' podcast. [refer http://www.amazon.com/It-Starts-Food-Discover-Unexpected/dp/1936608898/ref=pd_sim_b_7 ]
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[Quote No.46796] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] The keys to sustained weight loss (30 lbs. or more, maintained for longer than TWO YEARS, not six months, or one year) are established by good research. You don't need to buy a book to accomplish the requirements: proper diet, and physical activity. I'm a family physician that lost more than 30 lbs. 16 years ago, and have kept it off. I did it by following the research based information noted long ago in a Scientific American article. And I'll give you the info for free in two parts: Food: Eat fresh fruits and vegetables, lean meat and fish. Stay away from the white stuff (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes, sugar)... Exercise: Here's the rough part: people that have lost 30 lbs. and kept it off for more than two years AVERAGE an hour of physical activity per day. Lots of ways to get this done, often creativity is required. I have patients that are long-haul truckers and traveling salesmen that, against formidable odds, are thin and healthy. They have found ways to get this one hour of activity in (often by splitting it into smaller intervals several times/day). I had to begin riding my bicycle to work every day (45 minutes each way). I do it year round (even have studded snow tires for my commuter bike). You can find a way. Don't use weather as an excuse to skip your activity. There is no such thing as bad weather, there are only improperly dressed people, say the Scandinavians. I'm Irish, but I believe them." - Daniel Murphy M.D.
Doctor and Top 500 Reviewer on Amazon. [http://www.amazon.com/The-17-Day-Diet-Designed/dp/1451648650/ref=cm_srch_res_rpli_22 ]
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[Quote No.46797] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] While ancestral, primal, paleo, low ‘bad - simple rather than comples’ carb diets appear to work well and be popular at present - often combined with intermittent fasting, other diets and nutritional lifestyles that might be worth exploring to develop your understanding of the various approaches and how they have changed over time could include:- ---[1] Low Carb diets: Stillman Diet; Atkin’s Diet; ketogenic diets, Scarsdale diet; South Beach Diet; Hamptons Diet; New York Diet; Dr Gott's No Flour, No Sugar Diet; Sugar Busters Diet; Protein Power Diet; Zone Diet; TNT (Targeted Nutrition Tactics) Diet; Low GI (Glycemic Index) Diet (refer also Glycemic Load diet); Dukan Diet; ---[2] Low Fat diets: Pritikin Diet; Mediterranean Diet; ---[3] Low Protein - at least from meat - including Vegetarian diets: The China Study Diet; Ornish Diet; Macrobiotic Diet; Susan Schenck's 'Beyond Broccoli' Diet; ---[4] Other diets: low calorie (calorie counting) diets; calorie in - calorie out (exercise) diets; calorie density diets (lots of food by volume but few calories - for example Volumetrics Diet, or lots of food by weight but few calories - for example Pritikin Diet); nutrition (per calorie) density diets (i.e. lots of nutrition with few calories - for example Nutritarian Diet); portion control diets; thought (cognitive 'self-talk', hypnosis) control diets; whole, unprocessed foods Versus refined, processed foods diets; Intermittent Fasting diets." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.46798] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Eat less, chew more! You will enjoy the taste for longer, feel like you have eaten more than you have, improve digestion and save money." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.46801] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Intermittent Fasting] Numerous animal and human studies done over the past 15 years suggest that periodic fasting can have dramatic results not only in areas of weight (fat) loss, but in overall health and longevity as well. A recent article in the ‘American Journal of Clinical Nutrition’ [http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/86/1/7.full ] gives a great overview of these benefits which include decreases in blood pressure, reduction in oxidative damage to lipids, protein and DNA, improvement in insulin sensitivity and glucose uptake, as well as decreases in fat mass. How can you argue with results like these? And it all makes sense from an evolutionary perspective, because our predecessors almost certainly went through regular cycles where food was either abundant or very scarce. The body may have established protective mechanisms to adapt to these conditions by sensitizing insulin receptors when it was critical that every bit of food be efficiently used or stored (as in famine), or by desensitizing them when there was a surplus, so the body wouldn’t be overly-burdened by grossly excessive calorie intake. Beyond insulin sensitivity, it appears that caloric restriction and intermittent fasting may ‘turn on’ certain genes that repair specific tissues that would not otherwise be repaired in times of surplus. One could surmise that this adaptation serves to allow certain cells to live longer (as repaired cells) during famine since it’s energetically less expensive to repair a cell than to divide and create a new one. That might help explain some of the extended longevity seen in animal studies using caloric restriction and/or intermittent fasting. Intermittent fasting has also been shown to reduce spontaneous cancers in animal studies, which could be due to a decrease in oxidative damage or an increase in immune response... Fasting turns on autophagy (most studies nowadays treat this as common knowledge), which is the process by which cells recycle waste material, eliminate or downregulate wasteful processes, and repair themselves. Why is autophagy so important? It’s required to maintain muscle mass, and inhibiting it induces atrophy of adult skeletal muscle. It reduces the negative effects of aging and reduces the incidence and progression of aging-related diseases. In fact, researchers have determined that autophagy is the essential aspect of the anti-aging mechanism of fasting. Without the autophagy that fasting provides, you would get very few of the benefits. Fasting even increases neuronal autophagy, which aids in maintaining mental health and function. Short term fasting, too. No marathon thirty-six hour fast required... [So]...fasting once in a while seems to offer many of the same benefits of calorie restriction – you know, stuff like increased longevity, neuroprotection, increased insulin sensitivity, stronger resistance to stress, some cool effects on endogenous hormone production, increased mental clarity, plus more... " - Mark Sisson
Author of the best-selling book, ‘The Primal Blueprint’. [http://www.marksdailyapple.com/health-benefits-of-intermittent-fasting/#axzz2UTEQSCUc and http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting/#axzz2UTEQSCUc . Also refer http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-weight-loss/#axzz2UTEQSCUc ]
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[Quote No.46802] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Intermittent Fasting] ...let’s look at how weight loss occurs during a fast. I’ll stick to research involving humans only (sorry, rodent personal trainers). ----Secretion of growth hormone, one of the premier fat burning hormones, increases during a fast. In a five-day fasting protocol, men experienced increased GH secretion on day one and day five (the only two days where GH was measured). A later study showed that during two-day fasting sessions, growth hormone secretions increased in both frequency and intensity in men. They experienced more frequent GH bursts and each burst secreted a higher mass of GH. A more recent study found that 24-hour fasts increased GH by 1300% in women and almost 2000% in men. -----Fasting decreases fasting insulin levels. The presence of insulin inhibits lipolysis, the release of stored triglycerides (body fat). Without lipolysis actually releasing stored body fat, it’s rather difficult to, well, burn that body fat for energy. During a fast, fasting insulin decreases and lipolysis increases. This insulin-blunting aspect of fasting quite literally allows the fast to be successful, because without the ability to access stored body fat for energy, making it through a period of zero caloric intake will be nigh impossible. ----Fasting improves insulin sensitivity. 20-hour fasts were enough to improve insulin sensitivity in men. ----Fasting increases the catecholamines, both adrenaline (epinephrine) and noradrenaline (norepinephrine). Both catecholamines increase resting energy expenditure during a fast, and guess where your fasting body finds the energy to expend? From body fat. Catecholamines activate hormone sensitive lipase present in adipose tissue, spurring the release of said fat. This makes intuitive sense, doesn’t it? If you’re hungry in the wild, you need to hunt (or gather, or fish, or somehow procure food) and you need energy to do it. The catecholamines help provide some of that energy while burning fat in the process..." - Mark Sisson
Author of the best-selling book, ‘The Primal Blueprint’. [Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-weight-loss/#ixzz2UVDwXKqs ]
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[Quote No.46803] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Intermittent Fasting] ...One potential pathway by which both fasting and CR [caloric restriction] increase lifespan [longevity] is via inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin, or mTOR. The mTOR pathway can be said to drive the aging process. It is necessary for cell growth, like muscle cells (in stable mTOR states) or certain cancer cells (in overactive mTOR states), and it is highly sensitive to nutrient availability and hormonal signaling. In mice, feeding rapamycin – a potent inhibitor of mTOR - increases lifespan. Both not eating (fasting) and lowering potential hormonal messengers (like insulin) also inhibit mTOR activity by spiking AMPK. Indeed, in the presence of insulin, mTOR is upregulated. We know from previous posts that fasting reduces fasting insulin. In insulin resistant people, insulin is chronically elevated and mTOR is overactive. We also know that fasting reduces insulin resistance and increases insulin sensitivity, thus normalizing or inhibiting excessive mTOR activity. This kind of mTOR inhibition also works with CR, but if adherence is easier, side effects are lessened, and AMPK spiking is greater with total caloric restriction (fasting) than with partial CR, which is the more effective method? So, it’s starting to look like the longevity benefits of fasting can be attributed to the degree of caloric restriction. That is, fasting is total caloric restriction, while CR is partial. When you fast, you’re going whole hog. You’re subjecting yourself to an acute stressor, getting the hormetic benefits, and then recovering from that stressor by eating normally thereafter (until you do it again). When you calorie restrict, you’re undergoing a chronic stressor. Day in, day out, you’re worrying about food, restricting energy and nutrient intake, and there’s really no period of recovery. You’re always residing in a partially restricted state, drifting from paltry meal to paltry meal. There is no feast. It’s like lifting heavy and sprinting a few times a week versus jogging a 10k every day. Chronic cardio versus acute, high intensity exercise. What about 'healthspan'? Can fasting compress morbidity - can it help us in our quest to live long and drop dead? I mean, let’s face it: who wants to be a frail, skinny-fat centenarian relegated to the bed or the walker or the wheelchair? Well, we know that intermittent fasting appears to conserve more lean mass than CR. In a recent meta-analysis, one group of researchers directly compared studies on calorie restriction to studies on intermittent fasting and found that while both were good for losing weight, ‘intermittent CR may be more effective for the retention of lean mass.’ And at the very least, I’d suggest to you that having better insulin sensitivity, less fat mass, more lean mass, a better-regulated mTOR pathway, improved blood lipids, better glucose control, and a less restricted diet makes for a better healthspan, a more enjoyable life, and a reduced risk of dying from the diseases of civilization." - Mark Sisson
Author of the best-selling book, ‘The Primal Blueprint’. [Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-longevity-lifespan/#ixzz2UVFyGpbB ]
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[Quote No.46804] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Intermittent Fasting] ...fasting appears to offer three main protective and therapeutic benefits to the brain: ----Fasting Boosts Neuronal Autophagy: I’ve cited this study before, but I’ll do it again because it’s central to the theme of today’s post: ‘short-term fasting induces profound neuronal autophagy.’ Autophagy, or ‘self-eating,’ is the process by which cells recycle waste material, downregulate wasteful processes, and repair themselves. Brain health is highly dependent on neuronal autophagy. In fact, a recent paper shows that deletion of an ‘essential autophagy gene’ in the hypothalamic neurons of fetal mice resulted in metabolic derangement (more body fat, poor glucose tolerance) and impaired neuronal development. Another study shows that disruption of neuronal autophagy induces neurodegeneration. Simply put, without the process of autophagy, brains neither develop properly nor function the way they should. -----Fasting Increases Levels of Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF): BDNF is a protein that interacts with neurons in the hippocampus, cortex, and basal forebrain (the parts of the brain that regulate memory, learning, and higher cognitive function – uniquely human stuff). It helps existing neurons survive while spurring the growth of new neurons (neurogenesis) and the development of synapses (lines of communication between neurons). Low levels of BDNF are linked to Alzheimer’s, and supplementary BDNF prevents neuronal death, memory loss, and cognitive impairment in an animal model of Alzheimer’s disease. -----Fasting Increases Production of Ketones: Ketone bodies like hydroxybutyrate are famously neuroprotective, and fasting often induces ketosis. Increased autophagy and BDNF and ketones from fasting sounds awesome, but do they manifest as actual benefits to neurological health? Let’s see what the research says. No discussion of fasting and neurological health research is complete (or can even be initiated) without including Mark Mattson. Mattson, chief neuroscientist at the National Institute on Aging, has been releasing paper after paper on the neurological effects of intermittent fasting for the past dozen years, and he’s amassed an impressive body of work that suggests IF can induce neurogenesis and protect against brain injury and disease. In the following sections, I’ll discuss the evidence – from Mattson and other researchers – for the beneficial effects of fasting on neurological health across a spectrum of conditions. -------Stroke: The most common type of strokes are ischemic strokes (composing about 88% of all strokes) - cerebrovascular events in which a blood vessel that supplies blood to the brain is blocked by a clot. Without blood, the brain can’t get oxygen or nutrients, and (often permanent) brain damage can occur. In an animal model of ischemic stroke, fasting upregulated BDNF and other neuroprotective proteins, reduced mortality and inflammation, and increased cognitive health and function. However, it’s worth noting that fasting was most effective against stroke in young animals, who enjoyed a four-fold increase in neuroprotective and neurogenerative BDNF. Middle aged mice saw a two-fold increase in BDNF, while older mice saw no increase. Post-stroke cognitive function had a similar relationship to age and feeding status; young and middle-aged fasted mice retained far more than old mice and fed mice. Fasted mice displayed lower levels of inflammatory cytokines, but this effect was also modulated by age. Overall, fasting increased neuroprotective proteins and decreased inflammatory cytokines in young and middle-aged mice, thereby reducing the brain damage incurred by stroke. ------Brain Trauma: Research indicates that fasting is also effective against physical trauma to the brain. It’s not that fasting somehow physically repels impending trauma by generating a magical ketone-powered force field; it’s that fasting reduces the oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, and cognitive decline that normally result from brain trauma. Employing one of these contraptions, researchers induced a ‘controlled cortical impact’ on fasting rats and found that a 24-hour fast (but not a 48-hour fast) was neuroprotective. Perhaps the reduced appetite that commonly accompanies a concussion is a protective mechanism rather than an annoying side effect? ------Cervical Spine Injury: ‘Every other day’ fasting was neuroprotective following an injury to a rat’s cervical spine. Despite extensive trauma, fasted rats improved gait pattern, vertical exploration, and forelimb function (all heavily dependent on brain function). Neuronal integrity was preserved, cortical lesion volume was reduced, and corticospinal axon (nerve fiber) sprouting increased. The same team performed a similar study on mice suffering from a spinal cord injury, but had very different results; every other day fasting failed to confer any neuroprotective or functional benefits to the injured mice whatsoever. How can we reconcile these apparently contradictory findings? Well, in the rats who experienced neuroprotection, fasting increased ketone production by 2 or 3 fold. The fasting mice never reached ketosis. Ketosis was key. ------Alzheimer’s disease: In a mouse model of Alzheimer’s disease, both intermittent fasting and 40% (!) calorie restriction conferred cognitive and behavioral benefits when compared to mice on the control diet. IF [Intermittent Fasting] and CR [Caloric Restriction] mice showed higher levels of exploratory behavior, and, when placed in a Morris water maze, found the escape platform sooner than the control mice. However, only IF mice showed evidence of protection against synaptic pathology – a hallmark of the disease. ------Huntington’s disease. Huntington’s disease is also characterized by a depletion in BDNF levels. In a rat model of the disease, intermittent fasting normalized BDNF levels, while regular feeding kept them low. Fasting rats lived longer and even enjoyed better glucose tolerance than ad libitum [free-to-consume-as-much-as-desired] fed rats. By all accounts, fasting slowed progression of Huntington’s disease. Age-Related Cognitive Decline: We’ve all had a grandmother who called us by our sibling’s name, or a grandpa who forgot to unwrap the Werther’s Original before popping it into his mouth – these are the innocent, simple, quaint, seemingly unavoidable declines in cognition that accompany the aging process. Well, maybe they aren’t unavoidable. Although most of the research focuses on neurological trauma and disease, there’s evidence that intermittent fasting is good for basic age-related cognitive decline. I find it interesting that this was ‘late-onset’ intermittent fasting, meaning elderly rats who began fasting only after showing signs of decline still wrought cognitive benefits. Contrast that with the stroke study in which older rodents saw almost no benefit from fasting and a picture emerges: as long as they’re not trying to counter a debilitating event, like ischemic stroke or trauma, older brains can also expect to benefit from fasting. ------Depression? Depression has long been associated with lower BDNF levels as a prognostic of the disease, but it’s only recently that researchers are entertaining the possibility that low BDNF and depression could be causally related. And indeed – antidepressants actually increase BDNF signaling and synthesis in the hippocampus (the part of the brain where depression ‘happens’). Could fasting help with depression via upregulation of BDNF and promotion of neurogenesis? Perhaps. I’d say it’s worth a shot, especially since skipping a few meals doesn’t require a prescription. Obviously, since these are mostly rodent studies, and hard-and-fast peer-reviewed evidence of the neuroprotective and neurogenerative effects of fasting in humans doesn’t exist yet, we’re only speculating. But I’d argue they are plausible speculations worth pursuing. The mechanisms are there. Speculations about IF’s other health effects – to general health and cancer and longevity and fat loss – are being borne out by human research. Both the risk and barrier to entry are low. And it makes sense in light of our evolutionary history as hunter-gatherers. In a recent interview, Mattson even couches the neuroprotective effects of fasting in evolutionary terms, noting that during pre-agricultural times of scarcity, people ‘whose brains responded best – who remembered where promising sources could be found or recalled how to avoid predators — would have been the ones who got the food’ and lived to pass on their genes." - Mark Sisson
Author of the best-selling book, ‘The Primal Blueprint’. [http://www.marksdailyapple.com/fasting-brain-function/#ixzz2UVHHvoe7 ]
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[Quote No.46805] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Diet, Stress, and Your [Brain and] Neurotransmitters: Stress and obesity have a strong link in our society. In order to combat the obesity epidemic effectively we need to recognize the connection and handle the underlying stressors. A group of hormones that are released when we are stressed are called glucocorticoids. These glucocorticoids remain in the blood for a significant time after the stressor is removed. Put a person under chronic stress and they will have constantly high amounts of glucocorticoids in their blood. The glucocorticoids initiate the release of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) which is a key player in our stress response. They also increase our cravings for sugary foods and they also act directly on increasing abdominal fat storage (Dallman, 2003). Dallman in her study concluded that ‘We believe people eat comfort food in an attempt to reduce the activity in the chronic-stress response network with its attendant anxiety.’ This is due to the decreased CRF, catecholamines, and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal activity found in depressed people that overeat (Dallman, 2003). To understand these links more let us take a step back and look at what is going on in our bodies. There are two types of neurotransmitters; inhibitory and excitatory. The inhibitors are serotonin and GABA. These neurotransmitters are the ones that make us feel good and also are responsible for our self-esteem and sleep. These get depleted and we suffer from depression, insomnia, and even anger. The excitatory neurotransmitters are glutamate, catecholamines, PEA, and dopamine. These are responsible for making us alert, our thinking, focus, memory, ambition, and stress. To look at a few of these, if we have low dopamine we will generally be fatigued, have trouble with numbers, low libido, and decreased short term memory. Low norepinephrine causes depression, decreased ambition, and dependence on stimulants such as caffeine. Too much norepinephrine and we get panic and insomnia. We need these neurotransmitters in the right balance to feel well and be healthy. Chronic neurotransmitter release leads to depletion over time. This is why medications work in the beginning, but then need to be adjusted. Our receptor sites for neurotransmitters work just like our receptors for insulin. Chronic up regulation of these neurotransmitters cause the receptor sites to desensitize to them to protect themselves from too much. So what causes desensitization and depletion of neurotransmitters? Diet for one. High glycemic carbohydrates cause spikes in dopamine and serotonin as well as opioids and cannabinoids (see my other articles on carb addiction and food addiction). Too little protein in the diet can also cause depletion due to some of the neurotransmitters being made up of amino acids. A 3oz serving of protein can actually raise epinephrine levels in 30 minutes. Other causes are heavy metal toxicity, low b-complex status, low omega 3 status, low estrogen, and stimulant use. Genetics also play a critical role in how much of the neurotransmitters we produce and how sensitive we are to them. Obesity as well as mental illness have strong genetic links. Another major factor that depletes neurotransmitters is stress. Stress raises free radicals, insulin, and blood pressure which all damage neurons. Our body has a checks and balances system to make sure we do not go too far in one direction. When we are stressed and our catecholamines rise we will release serotonin and GABA to counteract it. If we are constantly under stress and releasing serotonin and GABA we will desensitize to them and they will become depleted. This leaves the catecholamines to run rampant. Excess amounts of catecholamines in our system lead to depression, anxiety, and insomnia. Poor sleep, illness, and excessive heat will also deplete serotonin as does cortisol. Cortisol actually damages serotonin receptor sites. As was mentioned earlier we need all these neurotransmitters in balance to function properly. This is a requirement of our HPA-axis. Our HPA-axis controls our metabolism. Therefore, if the neurotransmitters are not in balance our metabolism gets thrown out of whack. One of the negative side effects of this is an up regulation in fat storage. This is what Dallman’s study showed as well. Sustained imbalances in neurotransmitters leads to increased risk for obesity. The take home from this is that we need to eat right, manage our stress, and get the right amount of exercise in order to achieve our health goals. A low carb paleo diet can help combat blood sugar imbalances, give us enough amino acids to make neurotransmitters, and correct nutrient deficiencies. Meditation has been shown to lower catecholamines and exercise can actually double serotonin and brain repair chemicals. Sunlight also increases serotonin. Give some stress management some serious thought, especially if your goals seem to be out of reach." - Kevin Cann
He is the owner of Genetic Potential Nutrition - www.geneticpotentialnutrition.com. He is a holistic nutritionist, wellness coach, and strength coach. He works with people fighting illness, to competitive athletes. Published on www.robbwolf.com on Thursday, April 26th, 2012. [http://robbwolf.com/2012/04/26/diet-stress-biochemistry/ ] [Refer - Dallman, Mary (2003). Chronic Stress and Obesity. www.pnas.org. Retrieved on April 17, 2012 http://www.pnas.org/gca?allch=&submit=Go&gca=pnas%3B100%2F20%2F11696 . - Other information was derived from a 2004 NANP seminar with Dr. Ramona Richard titled Brain Stress: Neurotransmitter Nutrient Support. ]
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[Quote No.46812] Need Area: Food > General
"Each meal is a chance to heal." - Mark Hyman M.D.
Physician, researcher, educator, activist, and five-time New York Times best-selling author.
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[Quote No.46813] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: The Paleo Diet - protein, fats and low-carbohydrates - is said to be] the one and only diet that ideally fits our genetic makeup." - Loren Cordain, PhD
Professor in the Department of Health and Exercise Science at Colorado State University. Quote from his book, 'The Paleo Diet'.
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[Quote No.46814] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] What to Eat on the Paleo Diet: While our books on The Paleo Diet provide much more detail on the foods you should and shouldn’t eat, here is a basic scheme of things: ----------Eat: --Grass-produced meats --Fish/seafood --Fresh fruits and veggies --Eggs --Nuts and seeds --Healthful oils (Olive, walnut, flaxseed, macadamia, avocado, coconut) ----------Don’t eat: --Cereal grains --Legumes (including peanuts) --Dairy --Refined sugar --Potatoes --Processed foods --Salt --Refined vegetable oils " - Loren Cordain, Ph.D.
One of the world's leading experts on Paleolithic diets, having researched and published many scientific studies as well as authoring a number of best-selling books for the general public. [http://thepaleodiet.com/what-to-eat-on-the-paleo-diet/ ]
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[Quote No.46816] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: whole, real foods rather than man-made, processed 'food'...] If man made it, hate it." - Jack LaLanne
Famous American fitness and nutrition advocate, who lived till he was 96 years old.
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[Quote No.46817] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Why do low-carbohydrate lifestyles and diets work?] A Metabolic Paradigm Shift, or Why Fat is the Preferred Fuel for Human Metabolism: There’s a good reason so many people (mostly the sugar-burners, whose disparate group includes fruitarians, veg*ans, HEDers, body-builders, most MDs, the USDA and virtually every RD program in the country) can’t seem to grasp why a lower carb, Primal approach to eating is a better choice for health and fitness: their fundamental paradigm – the core theory that underpins everything else in that belief system – is flawed. They remain slaves to the antiquated notion that glucose is the king of fuels, so they live their lives in a fear of running low. The truth is, fat is the preferred fuel of human metabolism and has been for most of human evolution. Under normal human circumstances, we actually require only minimal amounts of glucose, most or all of which can be supplied by the liver as needed on a daily basis. The simple SAD fact that carbs/glucose are so readily available and cheap today doesn’t mean that we should depend on them as a primary source of fuel or revere them so highly. In fact, it is this blind allegiance to the ‘Carb Paradigm’ that has driven so many of us to experience the vast array of metabolic problems that threaten to overwhelm our health care system. It boggles my mind that such a large segment of the so-called health and fitness community would continue to defend high carbohydrate diets with such tenacity. It should all be very obvious by now. The studies keep piling up indicating that carbohydrate intake is the major variable in determining body composition and that excess glucose from carbohydrate intake (especially from processed grains and sugars) is the primary culprit in obesity and in many disease processes. It follows logically that if you can limit carb intake to a range of which is absolutely necessary (and even up to 50 grams a day over) and make the difference up with tasty fats and protein, you can literally reprogram your genes back to the evolutionary-based factory setting you had at birth – the setting that offered you the opportunity to start life as a truly efficient fat-burning organism and to continue to do so for the rest of your life as long as you send the right signals to your genes. Becoming an efficient fat-burner is the major premise of the Primal Blueprint eating and exercise strategies. But logic doesn’t rule when you are stuck in the Carb Paradigm, so I still see some misguided bloggers decrying the ‘Primal Blueprint’ eating strategy as potentially harmful for its relatively low carb intake or stating that my advice to ‘generally keep carbs under 150 grams a day unless you’re an athlete’ is ridiculous. How many more times do I have to overhear a trainer advising a still-portly client to ‘eat 5 or 6 small meals throughout the day, always with some carbs, so you keep your blood sugar up and don’t go into starvation mode.’? It’s time to stop this nonsense and reframe the current views of human metabolism to accurately reflect the two and a half million years of evolution that shaped the current human genome – a perfect DNA recipe that fully expects us from birth to function largely on fats. ----It’s time for a Metabolic Paradigm Shift within the health and fitness world.---- ----The Faulty Carb Paradigm ‘Logic’ Goes Something Like This---- The basic underlying assumption is that glucose is the preferred fuel of most cells; BUT, because we can’t store very much glucose (as glycogen in liver and muscles), we need to provide a continuous source of glucose in the form of exogenous carbohydrate (high carb meals) to keep the brain, blood, and certain organs humming along and the muscles primed for activity. AND, if we don’t feed ourselves enough carbohydrate every few hours, our blood sugar will drop and we’ll go into ‘starvation mode’ and cannibalize our precious muscle tissue. AND any lack of regular glucose refilling (i.e. skipping a meal or fasting) will cause cortisol to rise, which will have additional deleterious effects. FURTHERMORE, an excess of glucose in the bloodstream is known to raise insulin and will predispose excess calories (from all sources) to be stored as fat. THEREFORE, we should also be doing a lot of moderate-to-heavy cardio or lifting activity most days to burn off this excess stored body fat. HOWEVER, if we want to be ready and able to exercise frequently and strenuously to burn off our stored fat, we need to eat lots of complex carbohydrates between workouts to refill our glycogen stores. And ULTIMATELY, the only way to lose weight is to restrict calories (calories in- less than-calories out), BUT if you’re working out regularly, it’s almost impossible to maintain a calorie-restricted regimen and still be able to work out hard enough to burn appreciable calories. Sheesh. Sure, there are exceptions, like the driven and genetically gifted types, who can train long hours, refuel on carbs and not add much body fat (hey, I was one). But unless you love to work out incessantly and have really lucky familial genes, the Carb Paradigm is an unsustainable and ridiculous literal and figurative treadmill, a self-fulfilling prophecy for most people who tend to gain weight steadily and insidiously over the years and wonder why. If you are one of the 60+% of the American population who is overweight, the above scenario plays itself out because you have spent your life programming your genes in the direction of being an effective sugar burner and, as a result, have become dependent on a fresh supply of sugar (carbs) every few hours. Naturally, in the presence of all that glucose, and provided you actually do some exercise, your genes will eventually get the signals to up-regulate the enzyme systems, pathways and receptors involved in sugar-burning and fat storage and they’ll down-regulate all those involved in accessing and burning fat for energy. Of course, that doesn’t make it right, but it sure makes it appear as if glucose is king. What makes it worse, if you don’t exercise, you head down the path to insulin resistance and/or obesity. ----The Problem: The Basic Assumption of the Carb Paradigm is Wrong---- Glucose is not the preferred fuel of muscle cells under normal human resting metabolic conditions or even under most normal human movement patterns (exercise). Fat is. Sure, given an unlimited supply of glucose and regular refilling of glycogen stores, skeletal muscle will burn through it during exercise the same way a fire burns through kindling when that’s all you have to offer. The body can shift carbohydrate oxidation to keep up with intake. But skeletal muscle can burn fat with great efficiency (and far less oxidative fallout) at relatively high outputs for very long bouts. Cardiac muscle actually prefers ketones, and the brain can run just fine (maybe even optimally) on a blend of ketones and minimal glucose. Our survival as a species has depended on these evolutionary adaptations away from glucose dependency. Entire civilizations have existed for ages on what is practically a zero-carb diet. Think about this: there is actually no requirement for any ‘essential dietary carbohydrates’ in human nutrition. It’s possible to live a very long and healthy life never consuming much – if any – in the way of carbs, provided you get adequate dietary protein and fat. The same can’t be said for going too long without protein or fat. Cut too far back on either of those macronutrients and you will eventually get sick and die. ----The Evolutionary Model---- Fat and protein were the dominant macronutrients (when food was even available) over the majority of our two-and-a-half million years as evolving humans. The lack of regular access to food and a scarcity of carbohydrates for much of this time necessitated that we adapt efficient pathways to readily store and access body fat for energy if we were to survive day-to-day and generation-to-generation. Our movement patterns were such that we never required large amounts of glucose or that we needed to store very much glycogen. It was predominantly fats, ketones and the minimal infusion of glucose via gluconeogenesis that got us here. Dietary carbs were insignificant. In fact, when you consider how ridiculously small the body’s glycogen reservoirs are, you understand that it would have been impossible for us to survive as a species if glucose were truly the ‘preferred’ fuel. The liver, the main back-up glycogen/glucose storage facility for the brain and other glucose-burning organs, can only store about 100 grams of glycogen. Less than a day’s worth. Your muscles can only hold another 350-500 grams, barely enough to run for 90 minutes at a reasonable clip, and that glycogen isn’t even available to provide fuel for the brain. Meanwhile, we have a virtually unlimited storage capacity for fat (like 100,000 grams or close to a million calories on some people). The reason glycogen storage wasn’t necessary is because, between our copious fat storage capability, easy access to fats as fuel, gluconeogenesis and ketones, we just didn’t need much. Evolution tends not to reward structures or functions that take up unnecessary space or waste energy. ----So How Much Glucose Do You Really Need?---- Much less than most people assume. At any one time, the total amount of glucose dissolved in the bloodstream of a healthy non-diabetic is equivalent to only a teaspoon (maybe 5 grams). Much more than that is toxic; much less than that and you pass out. That’s not much range for a so-called ‘preferred’ fuel, is it? Several studies have shown that under normal low MET conditions (at rest or low-to mid- levels of activity such as walking and easy work) the body only needs about 5 grams of glucose an hour. And that’s for people who aren’t yet fat-adapted or keto-adapted. The brain is the major consumer of glucose, needing maybe 120 grams a day in people who aren’t yet on a low carb eating program. Low carb eating reduces the brain’s glucose requirements considerably, and those who are very low carb (VLC) and keto-adapted may only require about 30 grams of glucose per day to fuel the brain (and little-to-none to fuel the muscles at <75% max efforts). Twenty of those grams can come from glycerol (a byproduct of fat metabolism) and the balance from gluconeogenesis in the liver (which can actually make up to a whopping 150 grams a day if you haven’t metabolically damaged it with NAFLD through fructose overdosing [NAFLD = Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. It is one cause of a fatty liver, occurring when fat is deposited (steatosis) in the liver not due to excessive alcohol use. It is related to insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome and may respond to treatments originally developed for other insulin-resistant states (e.g. diabetes mellitus type 2) such as weight loss, metformin and thiazolidinediones. Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most extreme form of NAFLD, and is regarded as a major cause of cirrhosis of the liver of unknown cause.]). Bottom line, unless you are a physical laborer or are training (exercising) hard on a daily basis, once you become fat-adapted, you probably don’t ever need to consume more than 150 grams of dietary carbs – and you can probably thrive on far less. Many PBers [‘Primal Blueprinters’] do very well (including working out) on 30-70 grams a day. ----The Fat Paradigm---- The Fat Paradigm, under which the human species has thrived quite effectively for two and a half million years, recognizes that human metabolism is pre-programmed by evolution to be primarily fat-based (the real preferred fuel). In other words, our genes expect us to function optimally when we consume fats and can easily access our stored fat. The Fat Paradigm acknowledges that the body is able to manufacture adequate glucose as needed. It acknowledges that most typical human movement patterns can be fueled almost entirely by fats and/or ketones if need be, but can draw on glycogen when energy bursts are required (and which can then be replaced over time). It acknowledges that fat (and cholesterol) are not the proximate cause of heart disease. It acknowledges that fat cells are designed to release stored fatty acids as required, especially during times of scarcity or fasting. It allows for intermittent fasting as a means of accelerating fat loss without sacrificing muscle tissue. It increases insulin sensitivity, modulates energy and mood swings, and allows for a normal and healthy drop in hunger and cravings. There is a downside, however: you can’t train long and hard day-in and day-out in the fat paradigm. Now then, having explained all this, please understand that I am not carb phobic. I actually permit more carbs in the ‘Primal Blueprint’ than many other low carb eating strategies. I prefer to view carbs as the ‘elective’ macronutrient, as a tool to use to manipulate your glycogen levels as needed. Low carb isn’t even the main objective of eating in the PB: eliminating grains, sugars and seed oils are the primary objective. Of course, when you get rid of that crap and naturally limit your carb intake to veggies, root tubers and a few fruits, you almost invariably decrease carbs to under 150 grams a day. And that emulates our ancestral dietary intake. I came up with a simple Carbohydrate Curve a few years ago that offers a pretty concise picture of where most people ought to fall if they are seeking optimum health and energy, depending on their size, weight, sex, age, goals, etc. Now, many hundreds of thousands of user experiences later, I am finding that the Curve is pretty much spot on for a large segment of the population. When I say generally that a chronic intake of over 150 grams of carbs can lead to insidious weight gain over a lifetime, I am factoring in the concept that many people are at the effect of a familial genetic predisposition to storing fat easily under the carb paradigm (the 60+% overweight). I am also factoring in the drop in metabolism that happens naturally with age, as well as the fact that PBers [‘Primal Blueprinters’] don’t NEED to purge and refill glycogen stores every day via exercise. Yes, there are some people (a small percentage of outliers) who might maintain pretty decent body composition at up to 300 grams a day on little exercise. I would bet that they also are selective about the carb sources and do a better job of controlling overall calories, so there’s little excess to store. For most of the population, that 150 mark remains a good average level for maintaining ideal body composition. Well, that was a lot to digest today. You see where I’m going with this. I need your help in showing the health community that their basic assumptions are wrong and that they need to make a Metabolic Paradigm Shift. I’m sure there will be lots of specific questions, so bring ‘em on and I’ll do a follow up post in a week or two." - Mark Sisson
A leading advocate for paleo nutrition and the author of the best-selling ‘Primal Blueprint’ book. [Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/a-metabolic-paradigm-shift-fat-carbs-human-body-metabolism/#ixzz2UnsKxoUo ]
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[Quote No.46818] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Just as there are various versions of low-carb diets there are various versions of paleo, evolutionary-genetic-consistent diets. For example those espoused by Dr. Loren Cordain, Mark Sisson and the following. Individuals will need to read, experiment and develop their own understanding to find which variation best suits their mental and physical makeup.] The Archevore Diet ['Paleo 2.0’] - A pastoral whole foods diet that can improve your health by more closely emulating the evolutionary metabolic milieu (EM2) and avoiding the hazards of industrial foodways. This diet is a practical framework using whole foods easily available in the 21st century. It is designed to be as universal as possible. The average person who adopts it in preference to the standard american diet should be healthier in every respect, and will usually settle at a more optimal body composition spontaneously. The diet minimizes putative neolithic agents of disease (NADs) and ensures adequate micronutrition. The diet is designed to be healthy and sustainable as long as you are alive and to offer plenty of satisfaction, while minimizing food reward effects that lead to overeating. Historically, many find this diet results in spontaneous reduction in caloric intake and in health-improving fat loss, with no measuring, weighing or special supplements. I eat this way myself, of course. Although this diet is a framework designed to work well for as many people as possible who are starting with a western diet, it will not necessarily work well enough, or completely enough, for everyone who needs to lose fat or for anyone afflicted with any particular disease. For fat loss, more radical maneuvers might be necessary, depending on the etiology of your obesity. This information is offered as a free piece of educational information to anyone who finds it useful and is not to be considered individualized dietary or medical advice. Your health is your responsibilty. If you have any doubts about the advisability of any dietary maneuver that might affect your health, consult a competent physician. Go as far down the list as you can in whatever time frame you can manage. The further along the list you stop, the healthier you are likely to be. Earlier steps, in my clinical experience, will give more bang for the buck. There is no counting, measuring, or weighing. Calories count, but why bother counting?* ----1. Get plenty of sleep and deal with any non- food addictions. Laird Hamilton sleeps 9 hours. Can you surf Teahupoo? If you're drinking a 12-pack a day, or chain-smoking, diet may help but is hardly your first priority. ----2. Eliminate sugar and all caloric drinks. Drink water, tea or coffee. No sodas, sports drinks, juices, or milk. Don't add sugar to your food or eat things made with sugar or high fructose corn syrup. ----3. Eliminate gluten grains and wheat flour. No cake, cookies or pastries. No bread or pasta, whole grain or otherwise. This rule and rule #2 pretty much eliminate anything that comes in a box. White rice and whole meal corn products are reasonable sources of starch if tolerated, but not as nutritious as plant storage organs (root vegetables). ----4. Eliminate seed oils - grain and seed derived oils (cooking oils) Eat or fry with with ghee, pastured butter, animal fats, or coconut oil. Avoid temperate plant oils like corn, soy, canola, flax, walnut, etc. Go easy on the nuts, especially soy and peanuts. ----5. 2 or 3 meals a day is best. No snacking. You're not a herbivore. Whole foods prepared at home should be the rule. Low meal frequency is a powerful tool if you have weight to lose. ----6. Whole foods from animals. Eat them for the protein, the micronutrients and the fuel. Favor grass-fed ruminants like beef and lamb for your red meat. These meats have excellent n-6/n-3 ratios and their saturated and monounsaturated fats are a great fuel source. Wild game is good if you can process it yourself- but commercial venison and bison is too lean and is expensive. Eat fish a few times a week and pastured eggs if you like them. Eat offal for the vitamins and choline- some fresh beef liver 1-2 times a week is plenty. Mix it with your ground hamburger if you prefer. Pastured butter is good source of K2. ----7. Choose fuels from the EM2. Both animal fats and starchy plant organs are time-tested fuel sources for humans. Animal fats are an excellent dietary fuel and come with lots of fat soluble vitamins. It can work very well to simply replace your sugar and wheat calories with animal fats. If you are not diabetic and you prefer it, you can eat more starch and less animal fat. A low carb diet can rely more on ruminant fat and pastured butter. Plant storage organs like potatoes and sweet potatoes are nutrient laden and well tolerated by most people. Bananas and plantains are convenient starchy fruits. The soluble fiber in all these starchy foods is very likely beneficial, unlike the insoluble fiber in bran. If you are not diabetic, there is no reason whatsoever to avoid either animal fats or starches in whole food form. ----8. Make sure you are Vitamin D replete. Get daily midday sun in season or consider supplementation if you never get outside. ----9. Vegetables and fruits - Besides starchy plants for fuel and micronutrients, eat a variety of different colored plants of whatever you like and tolerate. Think hormesis. Some is better than none, but neither big salads nor fruit to excess will save your life. You're not a gorilla, you're an omnivore. ----10. Get proper exercise - both resistance and ‘aerobic’ exercise have benefits, including mental. Think hormesis again- the recovery periods are where you get the benefit. Lift weights every day or run marathons for ‘fun’, but not for your health. ----11. You won't get too much fructose eating reasonable quantities of fruit, but don't make it your staple. Most modern fruits aren't really just bags of sugar. That was hyperbole, folks, a rhetorical technique. Bananas rich in starch and citrus fruits are preferred. Don't go nuts with watermelon and agave, which are nearly pure fructose. Beware stone fruits like peaches and apricots if you have IBS - the polyols are fermented in your colon. A diet based on beef and potatoes is healthier than one based on granny smiths or 30 bananas. ----12. If you are allergic to milk protein or concerned about theoretical risks of casein, you can stick to butter and avoid milk, cream and soft cheeses. Aged cheeses 6 months and older may not have beta-casomorphin and are good sources of K2. No counting, measuring or weighing is required, nor is it encouraged. I am agnostic on macronutrient ratios outside of very broad parameters. Archevore eaters typically range from 5-35% carbohydrate, from 10-30% protein and from 50 to 80% fat (mostly from animals) but wider ranges are entirely possible if you are not dieting and you are meticulous about the quality of your animal food sources. If you are trying to lose weight, really minimizing fructose and eating 50-70g a day of carbohydrate as starch is recommended. Skipping breakfast or at least no carbs for breakfast can be very helpful. If you are at your desired weight and healthy, 20% of calories as carbs is plenty for most very active people. It is perfectly acceptable if you don't gain fat with it to eat more starch and less animal fat. Note that the 19th century categories called ‘Fat’ and ‘Carbohydrate’ are each broad macronutrient categories that contain both good and bad. Saturated and monounsaturated fat is generally good. A lot more than 4% of calories from PUFA (whether n-3 or n-6) is likely bad. For healthy non-diabetics, starch is good. Excess fructose (added sugar) may be bad. In wheat, the carbohydrate starch is probably not the major problem. It is the gluten proteins and wheat germ agglutinin that come along with the starch that are suspect. So forget ‘carbs vs fat’. It is neolithic agents of disease versus everything else. And consider that the way food is prepared and its cultural context (food reward) may itself prove to be a NAD. Most Archevores only know macronutrient metrics in retrospect, as they don't target numbers just like wild humans didn't target numbers. Your mileage may vary! So eat what you want. This is simply free advice that has worked very well for me and at least hundreds of patients and readers. I'm not trying to save the world, as I find it generally does not want saving. Note: The order of the steps is arrived at by balancing my best guess at the noxiousness of each neolithic agent or food with the prevalence of each agent in the north american diet and the effort/reward ratio of the step. If your culture has a different diet the order of the steps might change. For instance, Chinese who fry everything they eat in soybean oil and don't eat much wheat would move step three up to the step two position. * If you prefer to suffer with a calculator and scale without trying this first, knock yourself out, but why not try it first? If it doesn't work, go to 70g of carbs a day and take out whatever foods you are ‘enjoying’ the most. If that doesn't work, then you might indeed have to count calories. You might have lost the genetic lottery or it may just be too late." - Kurt Harris MD
He graduated from the University of Iowa with a Bachelor of Science in Zoology in 1983 and received my MD from University of Iowa College of Medicine in 1987. After residency training in radiology, and fellowship training in neuroradiology, he spent several years in academic positions at Iowa before entering private practice. I am currently a practicing board-certified radiologist and a senior member of the American Society of Neuroradiology. He has had a lifelong interest in science and medicine as culture, and believes all claims to scientific authority should be subject to thoughtful skepticism. After he heard Gary Taubes on the radio, he had an epiphany and ever since I've been exploring the field of nutrition through the lenses of medicine and evolutionary biology. [http://www.archevore.com/get-started/ ]
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[Quote No.46819] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: carbohydrates, glucose-sugars, insulin and leptin:] ---The truth about the hormone leptin and obesity.--- It's been called the ‘obesity hormone’ or ‘fat hormone’ -- but also the ‘starvation hormone.’ When scientists discovered leptin in 1994, excitement arose about its potential as a blockbuster weight loss treatment. Even today, the Internet is loaded with sites that sell leptin supplements. Any truth to those pitches? And what exactly is leptin? WebMD asked two experts on leptin to discuss how this hormone affects weight and appetite, as well as other aspects of health. ----Q. What is leptin?---- ‘Leptin is not our obesity hormone. Leptin is our starvation hormone,’ says Robert H. Lustig, MD, professor of pediatrics at the University of California, San Francisco and a member of the Endocrine Society's Obesity Task Force. Leptin is a protein that's made in the fat cells, circulates in the bloodstream, and goes to the brain. ‘Leptin is the way your fat cells tell your brain that your energy thermostat is set right,’ Lustig says. ‘Leptin tells your brain that you have enough energy stored in your fat cells to engage in normal, relatively expensive metabolic processes,’ he says. ‘In other words, when leptin levels are at a certain threshold -- for each person, it's probably genetically set -- when your leptin level is above that threshold, your brain senses that you have energy sufficiency, which means you can burn energy at a normal rate, eat food at a normal amount, engage in exercise at a normal rate, and you can engage in expensive processes, like puberty and pregnancy’. But when people diet, they eat less and their fat cells lose some fat, which then decreases the amount of leptin produced. ‘Let's say you starve, let's say you have decreased energy intake, let's say you lose weight,’ Lustig says. ‘Now your leptin level goes below your personal leptin threshold. When it does that, your brain senses starvation. That can occur at any leptin level, depending on what your leptin threshold is.’ ’Your brain senses that and says, ‘Hey, I don't have the energy onboard that I used to. I am now in a starvation state,'‘ Lustig says. Then several processes begin within the body to drive leptin levels back up. One includes stimulation of the vagus nerve, which runs between the brain and the abdomen. ‘The vagus nerve is your energy storage nerve,’ Lustig says. ‘Now the vagus nerve is turned on, so you get hungrier. Every single thing the vagus nerve does…[is] designed to make you take up extra energy and store it in your fat. Why? To generate more leptin so that your leptin can re-establish its personal leptin threshold... It causes you to eat and it causes you to get your leptin back to where it belongs.’ ----Q. How does leptin affect weight---- ‘Here's the question: If this thing works like a thermostat -- an adipostat -- why do we keep gaining weight?’ Lustig says. The problem is that overweight people have large amounts of leptin, but their brains aren't getting the important signal to stop eating. ‘How come the brain doesn't get it? That phenomenon is called ‘leptin resistance,'‘ says Lustig, who has done research on the subject. Leptin resistance is similar to insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes, in which the pancreas produces large amounts of insulin, but the body doesn't respond to it properly. Leptin levels can keep going higher as people get fatter. ‘We all have a leptin floor; the problem is, we don't have a leptin ceiling,’ Lustig says. ‘In leptin resistance, your leptin is high, which means you're fat, but your brain can't see it. In other words, your brain is starved, while your body is obese. And that's what obesity is: it's brain starvation.’ Not only is leptin part of the hunger system, it's also part of the reward system, Lustig says. ‘When your leptin levels are low, food is even more rewarding. When your leptin levels are high, that's supposed to extinguish the reward system so that you don't need to eat so much, and food doesn't look nearly as good.’ But in leptin-resistant people, the reward system doesn't cue a person to stop eating when leptin levels rise, Lustig says. ‘The leptin is being made by the fat cells, the fat cells are trying to tell the brain, ‘Hey, I don't need to eat so much,' but the brain can't get the signal. You feel hungrier and the reward doesn't get extinguished. It only gets fostered, and so you eat more and you keep going and it becomes a vicious cycle. If your brain can't see the leptin signal, you're going to get obese.’ ----Q. Can leptin work as an obesity treatment?---- That was the great hope after leptin's discovery in 1994, says Richard Atkinson, MD, an endocrinologist, obesity expert, and clinical professor of pathology at Virginia Commonwealth University. According to Atkinson, mouse experiments that began in the early 1970s pointed to ‘some sort of a hormone that affected food intake and body fat, but [scientists] didn't know what it was.’ When researchers finally discovered leptin in 1994, it helped ‘put obesity on the map because it suggested…obesity may have some physiological basis, instead of just being, ‘fat people can't keep their mouth shut,'‘ Atkinson says. ‘For those of us in the field of obesity, it was a watershed moment. Suddenly, everybody jumped on the bandwagon. This became a frantic obsession with the obesity community, at least.’ Many scientists explored leptin as a possible treatment for obesity; they believed that if people were leptin-deficient, giving them leptin would raise levels, which would signal them to stop overeating. ‘But when you started giving it to people, it didn't work so well,’ Atkinson says. ‘This stuff is made by fat tissue, and as you get fatter, you make more of it. That was quite a shock because everybody thought that obese people were going to be deficient in leptin,’ he says. With the more recent understanding of leptin resistance, it makes no sense to give people leptin if they have an impaired response, Lustig says. ‘The resistance is still there. No amount of leptin is going to overcome that resistance.’ Giving leptin only helps in a few extremely rare cases in the world in which people make no leptin at all, which causes them to overeat and become obese. When those people received leptin by injection, they stopped overeating and lost weight. But for the vast majority of people, the treatment won't work, nor is leptin approved as a medical treatment for weight loss. ‘Leptin is still sort of experimental. There's no real need to take leptin now, unless you're one of those very small -- probably 100 people in the world -- who doesn't make leptin,’ Atkinson says. ----Q. What about leptin supplements, such as those sold on the Internet?---- Because leptin is a digestible protein that doesn’t enter the bloodstream, it can’t be taken in supplement form, Atkinson says. ‘If you were to take it as a pill, it’s just like eating chicken or beef. It’s a protein and your body would just break it up, so you wouldn’t absorb it from a pill.’ So those ‘leptin supplements’ sold on the Internet don’t actually contain leptin, even though their name can be misleading. Instead, these supplements contain ingredients that are purported to help improve leptin functioning or feelings of fullness. ‘A variety of these supplements may be more aimed at total wellness -- things like helping balance other hormones, thyroid hormones -- just optimizing health so that the body begins to respond to leptin more appropriately and allows the person to feel full,’ says Duffy MacKay, ND, a licensed naturopathic doctor who serves as vice president of scientific and regulatory affairs at the Council for Responsible Nutrition, a trade group for the supplements industry. ‘Some of what you’re seeing is tried-and-true ingredients that are known to cause satiety, things like soluble fibers that have been known for a long time to help make people full,’ MacKay says. As for supplements’ effects on leptin functioning, the picture is less clear, he says. ‘The leptin science has only been unraveling since 1994, so there are a lot of unanswered questions.’ ‘No magic bullets are being discovered,’ MacKay says. ‘[But] we shouldn’t write this pathway off as something that we shouldn’t continue to explore.’ Rather than taking supplements that haven’t been fully proven to help, overweight people have other options to aid leptin functioning, experts say. Lustig advises them to reduce resistance to insulin (a hormone that controls blood sugar) and to bring down high levels of triglycerides (a blood lipid). ‘Insulin resistance generates leptin resistance. The practical advice is: Get your insulin down,’ Lustig says. ‘How do you get insulin down? The best way is don’t let it go up. Sugar makes insulin go up. We are overdosed on sugar in this country. I think that if we got the sugar down, our insulin resistance would improve and that would help with the weight loss.’ Reducing high triglyceride levels helps, too, Lustig says. Too much triglyceride interferes with leptin’s journey from the blood to the brain via a leptin transporter that allows the hormone into the brain. ‘When you’re insulin-resistant, you have high triglyceride [levels]. That’s one of the hallmarks,’ Lustig says. ‘Triglyceride seems to block leptin transport into the brain. In order to make your leptin work, you have to let the signaling occur. The only way to let the signaling occur is to get your triglyceride down.’ ----Q. Does leptin affect other parts of the body?---- Leptin appears to have many functions that scientists are still exploring. ‘It didn't work as a weight loss agent, but there's now starting to be some other things that are really interesting about it,’ Atkinson says. The hormone plays a role in heart and bone health, Lustig says. ‘We know that leptin is very important in keeping the immune system happy and that chronic inflammation occurs in the face of inadequate leptin signaling, and that's part of cardiovascular disease.’ ‘We also know that leptin has direct effects on bone to increase bone health and bone mineral density, so when your leptin's working right, your bones are healthier and they accrue more calcium,’ he says. Scientists are also finding some associations between leptin and certain cancers, Atkinson says. For example, some recent research suggests that leptin can promote the growth of melanoma, a type of skin cancer. According to Atkinson, leptin may even affect women's fertility. ‘If the brain doesn't sense leptin, you won't be fertile. If you think back to our caveman days, when there were lots of famines, if you didn't have enough fat to survive a pregnancy, then you're better off not getting pregnant in the first place. Some people have thought that the leptin feeds back on the hypothalamus to keep the reproductive hormones working well, too.’ " - Katherine Kam
[http://www.webmd.com/diet/features/the-facts-on-leptin-faq ]
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[Quote No.46820] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Ten benefits of a low carbohydrate diet: Providing general advice about diet and health that applies to everybody is a very difficult task. Therefore, public health guidelines generally focus on recommendations that guarantee adequate nutrition, vitamins and minerals. Furthermore, they emphasise balancing calorie intake with physical activity. Dietary guidelines for Americans 2010 recommend eating healthy foods like vegetables, fruits, whole grains, fat-free or low-fat dairy products, seafood, and to consume less sodium, saturated fats, trans fats, added sugars, and refined grains. However, when it comes to the individual, what is best in each case varies greatly. Individual recommendations have to take into account factors such as height, weight, BMI, body stature, waistline and metabolic function. Does he individual suffer from diabetes, high blood pressure, lipid problems, heart disease or obesity? Therefore, my belief is that dietary recommendations have to be tailored to the individual needs. As a physician, I have a very broad view when it comes to diet and nutrition. I am not a fan of a certain diet. Many people do very well on a balanced diet as suggested by the dietary guidelines. However, I have doubts concerning the overemphasis on low fat, as suggested by the guidelines. ‘Low fat ‘ has almost become synonymous with ‘good health’. I have nothing against low fat diets. However, I doubt that the emphasis on low fat, low saturated fat in particular, is based on good scientific evidence. Furthermore, I believe that the overemphasis on low fat may have stimulated consumers and manufacturers to choose foods that may be potentially harmful and could have contributed to the so-called obesity epidemic and increased incidence of type 2 diabetes. A low fat diet may be preferable for some individuals while other individuals may do better on a low carbohydrate diet. The fact that I may recommend a Paleo or an Atkins type diet for some people, does not mean that I am against whole corn bread or potatoes. Although I recommend everybody to avoid simple refined sugars and junk food, I think complex carbohydrates, starches and not least fiber should be a part of a healthy diet for most people. As a cardiologist, I see many patients who are overweight or obese. Many of these individuals suffer from the metabolic syndrome. It is estimated that nearly one of every four American adults suffer from this condition. These individuals have an increased risk of developing type -2 diabetes and heart disease. The metabolic syndrome is commonly associated with increased waist circumference, elevated blood pressure, elevated triglycerides, reduced levels of HDL – cholesterol (the good cholesterol), elevated blood sugar (glucose) and insulin levels. Treating and preventing this condition is of huge importance for the community and a great challenge for health professionals. For many years, I was hugely sceptical about recommending low carbohydrate, high fat diets (LCHF) to patients with overweight or obesity. Like so many of my colleagues, I was afraid such lifestyle might elevate blood cholesterol and increase the risk of coronary heart disease. However, during the last ten years or so, scientific studies have shown that LCHF diets may indeed be helpful if you suffer from overweight or obesity. They may not only help you lose weight, but they may also improve your general health in many ways. However, it was not until I had read three of my favorite books on the subject, ‘Good Calories Bad Calories’ by Gary Taubes, ‘Living Low Carb’ by Jonny Bowden and ‘The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living’ by Jeff S Volek and Stephen D Phinney that I gained enough courage to give it a try. I started with my self and enjoyed very good results. Since then I have been educating a number of may patients with overweight, obesity or signs of the metabolic syndrome about the possible health benefits of LCHF. I have seen many of them having a great success with this lifestyle. Most have managed to improve their general health and modifiy their cardiovascular risk factors in a positive way. I am absolutely not saying that other methods don´t work, but I can confirm that LCHF very often works in real life if you suffer from overweight or obesity. There is much evidence suggesting that people with the metabolic syndrome suffer from carbohydrate intolerance, a phenomenon that is associated with high levels of insulin and insulin resistance. This implies that there is an exaggerated glucose and insulin response to a given amount of carbohydrate ingested. Glucose uptake by muscles may be impaired which may help divert ingested carbohydrate to the liver where it is converted to fat. This may lead to elevated triglycerides and other lipid problems. Let´s say you decide to give it a try. You decide to avoid refined sugars entirely, throwing candy and beverages out of the window. You also cut down on other types of carbohydrates, avoiding potatoes, bread, corn, pasta and rice. Basically, the only carbohydrates you will eat are those found in vegetables and fruit, but you may want to limit them as well. To provide the body with energy, you will increase the consumption of natural healthy fats. You will eat dairy fat, animal fat and plant derived fat. You will avoid low fat dairy products because they are usually rich in artificial sugar. Then slowly, later on, you start selectively adding carbohydrate to your diet, in the amount tolerated so that you will not start to gain weight again. Just remember, before you do it, consult your doctor and ask for his advice, because there might be individual issues that have to be addressed. Have baseline tests performed, let him or her check your blood pressure, blood sugar and blood lipids (total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides). In three to six months you can check these markers again for comparison. And don´t forget to follow the advice of experts in the field or people who have experience, because there may be some pitfalls. For example, you may have to drink broth regularly because of the sodium loss that commonly accompanies LCHF diets. What can you expect? How will this lifestyle change affect our health? This is what is likely to happen following carbohydrate restriction. Keep in mind though, that there is individual variation, people do not all respond in exactly the same way. ----Ten benefits of a low carbohydrate diet.---- ----1. You will lose weight. Scientific studies and years of experience have shown that weight loss will occur on a LCHF diet. The amount of weight loss may vary between individuals and will also depend on how aggressive you are in getting rid of sugar and carbs. ----2. Blood sugar will improve. Studies have shown that low carbohydrate diets reduce levels of fasting glucose and glycohemoglobin. This may be beneficial, in particular if you have diabetes or prediabetes, which is quite common among individuals with the metabolic syndrome. ----3. Blood pressure will improve. High blood pressure is one of the strongest known risk factors for stroke and heart disease. Lowering blood pressure is therefore considered a very important step to lower the risk of cardiovascular disease. Studies indicate that LCHF diets lower blood pressure in in individuals with overweight or obesity. ----4. Triglycerides will improve. Blood levels of triglycerides have emerged as a very important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High serum triglyceride level is associated with abnormal lipoprotein metabolism, as well as with other risk factors including obesity, insulin resistance, diabetes mellitus, and lowered levels of HDL- cholesterol. It has been shown in a number of studies that carbohydrate restriction lowers triglyceride levels significantly. ----5. HDL – cholesterol will improve. HDL cholesterol is inversely related to both coronary heart disease and other cardiovascular disease mortality in both man and women. This means that low levels of HDL-cholesterol are associated with risk of heart disease. Carbohydrate restriction has been shown to increase blood levels of HDL-cholesterol. ----6. LDL-particle size will improve. LDL-Cholesterol particles exist in different sizes. On one hand we have the large, fluffy, cotton-ball like molecules, and on the other hand the small dense molecules. Many recent studies have looked into the importance of LDL-particle size. Studies show that people whose LDL-C particles are predominantly small and dense, have a threefold greater risk of coronary heart disease. Furthermore, the large and fluffy type of LDL-C may actually be protective. Studies indicate carbohydrate restriction positively affects particle size by reducing the number of very small and small LDL particles. ----7. LDL-particle number (LDL-P) will improve. Blood levels of LDL-P are strongly associated with the risk of cardiovascular disease and some studies indicate that LDL-P may be a stronger predictor of risk than the commonly used LDL-cholesterol. LCHF diets appear to significantly reduce LDL-P. ----8. Insulin resistance will be reduced. Insulin resistance is common in individuals with the metabolic syndrome and is strongly related abnormal lipid profile. There appears to be an association between insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Studies indicate that carbohydrate restriction significantly lowers insulin resistance compared to a low fat diet. ----9. Insulin levels will drop. High levels of insulin are associated with insulin resistance. Hyperinsulinemia (high levels of insulin in the blood) appears to be an independent risk factor for coronary heart disease. Therefore, lowering insulin levels may be beneficial. Carbohydrate restriction has been shown to significantly decrease insulin levels. ----10. C-reactive protein will be reduced. C-reactive protein (CRP) can be measured in blood and is a known marker of inflammation. CRP, in particular high sensitivity CRP (hs-CRP) has been associated with cardiovascular risk. There is evidence that carbohydrate restriction lowers the level of CRP, which may indicate that LCHF diets can reduce inflammation. Thus, scientific studies indicate that LCHF diets may have several health benefits for people with overweight, obesity or other signs of the metabolic syndrome." - Axel F. Sigurdsson MD, PhD, FACC.
Dr. Sigurdsson is a cardiologist at the Department of Cardiology at The Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik Iceland. He also practices cardiology at Hjartamidstodin (The Heart Center) which is a private heart clinic in the Reykjavik area. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), The Icelandic Society of Cardiology and the Swedish Society of Cardiology. Dr. Sigurdsson is a specialist in internal medicine and cardiology. He did his cardiology training at the Sahlgrenska/Östra University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden and at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria BC, Canada between 1988 – 1996. He is past president of the Icelandic Cardiac Society. Dr. Sigurdsson main interest has been in the field of coronary heart disease and heart failure. He has published more than 100 scientific abstracts, articles and book chapters in international journals and text books. ‘I have treated patients with heart disease for more than twenty years now. I am amazed by all the progress that in the field of medicine during this time. Prognosis has improved dramatically and patients have a better quality of life. During all those years I have become increasingly aware of the importance of preventive measures to fight disease. It has become clear to me that healthy nutrition and lifestyle is the key to our health and well being. However, to be able to use lifestyle measures to improve health you need knowledge. Published 11, Oct, 2012 [http://www.docsopinion.com/2012/10/11/ten-benefits-of-a-low-carbohydrate-diet/ ]
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[Quote No.46821] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] If you have a big ol' belly, or even a smallish one but you are apple shaped (that was me), then you have two layers of stored fat around your middle instead of the normal single layer. You’ve got some normal under-the-skin fat, called subcutaneous fat, and then you’ve got some abnormal fat built up around your intestines, called omental fat. Healthy people have a thin layer of fat under their skin. But having fat around your intestines is not normal. To learn how to get rid of it, it helps to know how it got there. This is my understanding of the process, in a short summary: When you eat unhealthy foods, your body can’t manufacture normal fat carrying particles called lipoproteins. Without normally functioning lipoproteins, your body has a hard time transporting fat from place to place, so it tends to stay in the first place it ends up after a meal: Within the tissue that supply all of your intestines with blood, called the omentum. If your triglycerides are high and your HDL ('good' cholesterol) is low, that’s a sign that you have abnormal fat-carrying particles and are likely to be lugging around more omental fat than someone with the same size waistline who has low triglycerides and high HDL. So if you want to get rid of omental fat, and trim your waistline, you have to do these two things: 1) Get your lipoproteins back to normal, and 2) Burn fat for energy. If being healthy had the equivalent of a first rule of thermodynamics it would be this: What’s good for one part of your body is good for all other parts. So the same foods and activities that fix your lipoproteins will enable you to burn fat for energy and get rid of belly fat for good." - Dr. Cate Shanahan
She is a board certified Family Physician. She trained in biochemistry and genetics at Cornell University before attending Robert Wood Johnson Medical School. She practiced in Hawaii for ten years where she studied ethnobotany and her healthiest patient’s culinary habits. [http://drcate.com/how-to-lose-omental-fat-burning-off-belly-flab-permanently/ ]
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[Quote No.46822] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Ketogenic - very low carb diets:] ...Ketones are small water-soluble compounds that are metabolized like fats, but unlike fats, they don’t need carnitine, which is an amino acid, to transport them into the mitochondria. That’s normally how fats are burned for energy. They have to be shuttled into the mitochondria and oxidized to produce usable energy. But in the case of ketones, that doesn’t have to happen, so they can be used for energy by every human cell type. And they’re especially important to neurons, which can only consume glucose or ketones. So if something’s wrong with glucose metabolism, as it often is in metabolic disorders, ketones can be the sole usable energy source, and this turns out to be why a ketogenic diet can be so effective in a lot of different neurological conditions like Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, dementia, and then even behavioral mood disorders like depression, and of course, blood sugar disorders like diabetes, which involve defects in glucose metabolism. So the benefits of ketogenic diets have been well known for a really long time. I think 70 or 80 years they’ve been used in clinical practice. But they’re often not used because the way that they’re typically employed, they’re difficult to sustain, and of course, with the fat phobia of the dominant paradigm that’s, I think, reversing a little bit now, clinicians were reluctant to use ketogenic diets for any length of time because of their concerns about heart disease with a high-fat diet. So there is evidence supporting a ketogenic diet for stroke prevention and for dealing with the sequelae of stroke. In fact, there’s at least four or five studies that I’ve seen and probably more, and the idea is that the protection of neurons results from the enhanced energy reserves that neurons would have because of the presence of ketones, which in turn improves the ability of neurons to resist metabolic insults or metabolic challenges. And a ketogenic diet may also have antioxidant and antiinflammatory effects. So there is a range of possibilities as to why a ketogenic diet may help. In terms of how to actually implement this and avoid some of the challenges of long-term ketogenic diets, which are usually under 20 grams of carbohydrates, I like Paul Jaminet’s approach, which he calls, I think, the Perfect Health Ketogenic Diet, and that’s a way of using MCT, medium-chain triglycerides and an amino acid called leucine, which is ketogenic, to make the diet ketogenic even with a higher intake of carbohydrates. And so the intake of carbohydrates on this approach would be 50 grams, which generally would be way too high to produce ketones. You wouldn’t go into ketosis normally if you’re eating 50 grams of carbohydrates, but 50 grams of carbohydrates from starchy tubers and fruits can prevent some of the problems associated with ketogenic diets and can make them easier to tolerate over the long term. So, if you’re eating 50 grams of carbohydrates, you’re gonna need to do two things usually to get yourself into ketosis. One is to increase your intake of medium-chain triglyceride, which is a type of fat and it’s a type of fat that’s ketogenic, and there are a couple ways to do this. One is coconut oil, which is about 50% MCT. You’d have to eat a lot of coconut oil to go into ketosis when you’re eating 50 grams of carbs, something like 8 to 12 tablespoons per day to achieve a moderate level of ketosis. And this is gonna vary, of course, from person to person, so the best way to find out how much you’re in ketosis is to buy Ketostix at the drugstore, which is a strip you can use to test your urine to determine where you’re at in terms of ketosis. So another option — and you can do this in conjunction with the coconut oil — is MCT oil, which is 100% pure medium-chain triglyceride. It’s hard to find in local stores, but you can get it online, and because it’s 100% medium-chain triglyceride versus 50%, you need half as much to get into ketosis, so 4 to 6 tablespoons of MCT oil is about the amount that most people need. Or you could do maybe, like, 2 tablespoons of MCT oil and 4 to 6 tablespoons of coconut oil, some combination of both. Some people really don’t care for the taste of MCT oil, some people like it, but since it’s a liquid oil, one of the advantages to using it is you can put it in salad dressings and things like that, which you can’t really do with coconut oil. In addition to the MCT and coconut oil, you want to take about 5 grams of leucine per day. Leucine is an amino acid, and some amino acids are ketogenic, and some are glucogenic. And leucine is ketogenic. So 5 grams a day of leucine plus the MCT will generally put people into ketosis even if they’re eating 50 grams of carbohydrates a day. And the leucine, you’re probably gonna need to get a powder because capsules generally only have a few hundreds milligrams, so you’d be swallowing a whole bunch of capsules in order to get to 5 grams per day...The timing for the MCT doesn’t matter so much. Generally it’s recommended to take amino acids on an empty stomach, but you may need to split up the doses because taking 5 grams of leucine on an empty stomach might be a little hard to do. Some people will get nauseous and have some other symptoms. So you could split that into divided doses on an empty stomach." - Chris Kresser
He's a licensed acupuncturist and practitioner of integrative medicine. [http://chriskresser.com/naturally-treating-heartburn-infant-reflux-and-stroke-prevention ]
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[Quote No.46823] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: Variations among paleo diets:] What’s the Difference Between Primal and Paleo? We hear and read it all the time – the comparison of the [Mark Sisson's] 'Primal Blueprint' and the so-called Paleo Diet, for which Loren Cordain is the most recognized voice. Sure, it’s a perfectly reasonable association to make, but we thought we’d take some time to address the other side of the coin today. The Paleo Diet and Primal Blueprint, it’s true, are based on similar evolutionary science. The story goes something like this. Our modern Western diet bears little resemblance to the eating habits of early humans throughout 100,000+ years of evolutionary history. Instead, since the agricultural revolution some mere 10,000 years ago, we’ve adopted a nutritional regime that our physiology wasn’t and still isn’t adequately adapted to. When the basics of our diet return to the patterns of our pre-agricultural ancestors, we’re operating with, instead of against, our natural physiology. More simply: eat as our ancestors ate, and we’ll be healthier for it. More specifically, the Paleo Diet and Primal Blueprint both suggest, limit carb intake (especially grains), eat more protein and include lots of veggies as a base. But in the midst of this common ground are some significant interpretational differences and approaches. Association, comparison – sure. But conflation? Not so fast. A fundamental difference? The role of saturated fats. Cordain and many within the paleo community continue to harbor a fear of saturated fats as the bogey that raises cholesterol and instigates heart disease instead of a critical source of nutrients for neurological functioning and other essential physiological processes. Partaking of only lean meats, eschewing butter and coconut oil (two Primal Blueprint favorites based on health benefits supported by extensive research), restricting egg consumption – this is not your Granddaddy Grok’s diet. As many critics of the Paleo Diet have pointed out, early humans left virtually nothing of the animal carcasses they were so fortunate to bag. And the fact is they favored not the lean muscle meat but the richer organ meats, bone marrow and even fat deposits themselves. Grok, after all, was just trying to get enough calories and nutrients to stay alive from one day to the next. The denser in energy, the more valued the food. (And, can we add here, more tasty?) And then there’s the discrepancies surrounding other fats. Sure, there’s a general agreement about the importance of omega 3:6 balance, but the particulars diverge. In the Primal Blueprint, unlike Cordain’s version of the Paleo Diet, omega 3 sources like canola oil are suspect. The fact is, the deodorization process that canola oil is nearly always subjected to removes the omega 3 content. But when you’ve written off saturated fat sources (like good old coconut oil), you’re pretty much stuck wading in the murky waters of processed polyunsaturated products. What’s wrong with this picture? Also at issue is the role of diet sodas (allowed by Cordain) and other artificial sweeteners. The opinion of many in the paleo community is that as long as it’s not sugar, it’s acceptable. Working around the problem like this seems to be nothing more than a manipulation. Although the Primal Blueprint doesn’t demonize the occasional use of artificial sweeteners, it makes the stipulation that its use should be limited to foods or beverages that will inherently add something positive to the diet. In other words, if you aren’t getting anything positive from the meal or drink, you shouldn’t be taking the risk of the artificial sweetener. A better angle? Expand your cooking repertoire. Train your taste buds in the right direction, and don’t let the artificial stuff get in the way of that progress. Finally and most importantly, the Primal Blueprint works as a broad, holistic approach to living and not simply a list for eating. While the majority of the underlying assumptions and suggestions of the Paleo Diet are generally sound, the diet encompasses only a fraction of what it takes to live a healthy life in the modern world. The Primal Blueprint recommends wise supplementation appropriate to counter the stressors and toxins unique to our life today. (Grok didn’t have it all bad.) In its fitness and stress management approach, the Blueprint further highlights and capitalizes on our natural physiological functioning. The Blueprint emphasizes the overlap of good diet with essential fitness and relaxation principles to maximize muscle mass and organ reserve and to defend against the inflammation, sarcopenia and other preventable factors behind the aging process. And isn’t it a comfort to know that power over your health is seated in more than diet? The big picture of a healthy, fit and happy lifestyle involves more than isolating a specific issue. The Primal Blueprint was designed for the purpose of offering a guide for all elements of healthy living. Let’s face it, some days life makes it particularly difficult to have the perfect diet. We like to think of the Primal Blueprint design as a comprehensive cover, so to speak. The knowledge and efforts you exert in each area (diet, fitness, supplementation, stress management, sleep, etc.) can make a difference when the realities of day to day life keep you from doing a 100% in a given area." - Mark Sisson
A leading advocate for paleo nutrition and the author of the best-selling ‘Primal Blueprint’ book. Published 12th Nov, 2008. [Read more: http://www.marksdailyapple.com/whats-the-difference-between-primal-and-paleo/#ixzz2UxoZdyMb ]
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[Quote No.46824] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] The Paleo diet is the healthiest way you can eat because it is the ONLY nutritional approach that works with your genetics to help you stay lean, strong and energetic! Research in biology, biochemistry, Ophthalmology, Dermatology and many other disciplines indicate it is our modern diet, full of refined foods, trans fats and sugar, that is at the root of degenerative diseases such as obesity, cancer, diabetes, heart disease, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, depression and infertility." - Robb Wolf
He wrote a book called 'The Paleo Solution' which became a New York Times Bestseller. The book incorporated cutting edge research from genetics, biochemistry and anthropology. He was a research biochemist who traded in his lab coat to become one of the most sought after strength and conditioning coaches in the world.
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[Quote No.46825] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Disclaimer - The information included on this site is for educational purposes only. It is not intended nor implied to be a substitute for professional medical advice. The reader should always consult his or her healthcare provider to determine the appropriateness of the information for their own situation or if they have any questions regarding a medical condition or treatment plan. Reading the information on this website does not create a physician-patient relationship." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
Editor of imagi-natives.com
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[Quote No.46826] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] ...All this should make us rethink just how 'healthy' all those low GI [Glycemic Index] foods really are. If we really want to eat foods that won't raise our blood sugar or stimulate insulin response, we will be a lot better off eating protein, fat, fresh greens, and colorful fresh low carbohydrate vegetables in place of any carbohydrate-rich foods." - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected, best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/22168291.php ]
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[Quote No.46827] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] When you feel out of control with your eating, ask, ‘Am I physically hungry?’…[Often you are not physically hungry, with a gnawing feeling in the pit of your stomach, but are rather non-physically hungry.] Here are some reasons for non-physiological hunger: ---Are you surrounding yourself with food cues? Watching TV has been shown to increase obesity not just because you sit there for hours without doing anything, but because TV ads are full of food cues which get us wandering into the kitchen looking for something to eat. The fact is, most of us if we see food will get hungry. In fact, just thinking about food may cause insulin to be secreted by the beta cells of a normal person. So do what you can to avoid adding food porn to your life. Do not read cookbooks, low carb or otherwise. Do not watch cooking shows. Do not walk into the kitchen unless you have a very good reason for being there. If you are going to be watching TV, make sure the house is not full of handy snack food items. If they aren't there, you won't eat them. If they are, you probably will. You may have to ask for help from your family to make this one work. Explain to them what is at stake and ask that they help you by keeping food out of the house that you know you can't handle. ---Are you eating out of habit and boredom rather than hunger? We get conditioned to eat things. Sunday football means chips and dip. Ten A.M. at the office is coffee and donut time. If you actually stop and check, you may find that you aren't hungry when you eat these foods at all. They are just habits you've gotten into. Sitting around with nothing to do often leads to boredom eating. Again, stop and ask yourself, ‘Am I hungry?’ If not, find something else to do. Taking up a hobby that uses your hands, like knitting, or spending time typing on your computer are good ways to keep yourself from this kind of random eating. If you are feeling aimless and there is time, why not take a short walk, instead of snacking? If you ask yourself, ‘Am I hungry?’ you may be surprised how many times you eat when the answer is, ‘not really’." - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/22878343.php ]
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[Quote No.46828] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Low carb diets are very healthy as long as they are really low carb [i.e. ketogenic]. But the bad news is that if your carbohydrate intake starts to rise over 120 grams per day, your diets will become very unhealthy unless you cut back on fat. A high fat intake is only healthy with a truly low carb diet. The studies that convinced doctors in the 1970s that low carb diets were dangerous were all studies of people eating 'low carb' diets of 150 grams of carbohydrate a day or more. And more recent research suggests that those diets are just as unhealthy now as they were then. If you can control your blood sugar with a diet that cuts carbs to a level nearer 150 grams a day, as opposed to 100 grams a day, keep your fats to 30% of all calories and you'll be fine. [More information about this can be found in her book, ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’ and at http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/19066498.php along with a very useful calculator for determining grams of protein and fat, at specific carbohydrate grams per day, for a set, desired weight loss per week, based on peer-reviewed scientific studies at http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19058429.php and http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/DietMakeupCalc.php .]" - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don\'t Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/19066498.php ]
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[Quote No.46829] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet: What about the 'dangers' of low-carb diets, for example saturated fats and kidney problems?] ... ---The 10,000 Pound Gorilla of Nutritional Research: Gary Taubes' Book ‘Good Calories, Bad Calories’: If you are really interested in learning the whole ugly history of why modern nutritional ‘science’ has endorsed the low [saturated] fat diet hypothesis in the absence of any rigorous research supporting its effectiveness either for fighting heart disease or causing weight loss, you must read Gary Taubes' book, published in October of 2007, ‘Good Calories, Bad Calories’. Taubes provides descriptions and analyses of hundreds of nutritional studies performed since the 1940s. He also cites several well-conducted studies whose results were suppressed because they didn't match what diet authorities thought the results should be. Taubes also shows how many studies that have been cited over the years to support the low fat hypothesis actually did not prove what they were said to prove. While many reviewers have quibbled with a sentence here or there in Taubes' book, there is no way a thinking person can read it and not end up agreeing with is main point which is that mainstream diet advice over the past fifty years has not been based on the findings of well conducted scientific research, for reasons that have to do with the way personality and power politics play out within the scientific community. ---A Final Caution About ‘Low Carb’ Diet Studies: You will see a lot of studies, often published in prestigious journals, that claim to prove that some other diet is better for people with diabetes than a low carb diet. Before you get swayed by these findings, take a close look at the study and see how the researchers define ‘low carbohydrate.’ In quite a few high profile studies published recently the ‘low carb’ diet turns out to be one containing anywhere from 120 to 180 grams of carbohydrate a day. For most of us, this is far too much carbohydrate. It will raise our blood sugar dramatically and when that happens, we lose all the benefits of carb restriction. ---Be Sceptical of Scare Studies: The evidence in support of the efficacy and safety of low carb diets keeps accumulating [refer http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/19066498.php and]. But there is a lot of money in selling cheap grains to people with cardiovascular disease and diabetes and calling these cheap grains ‘health food’. The big health organizations like the American Heart Association and the American Diabetes Association have spent decades telling the public that eating fat is dangerous and that high carbohydrate diets are healthy. They continue to do so rather than admit that for a generation they've been giving the public flawed advice that worsens their diabetes and heart disease. As a result, you see a persistent stream of studies that are presented as if they proved that eating a low carb diet will give you a heart attack. When the press reports on these studies reporters invariably add that eating a low fat diet will prevent heart disease--though as you read above, huge studies lasting many years and involving many thousands of humans have been unable to come up with any data to support this theory. When studies attacking low carb diets involve human subjects, they often draw their conclusions from the analysis of food questionnaires. An example are studies that claim that eating meat leads to terrible health outcomes. What these studies don't do, is ask people what they ate with their meat, which is often supersized fries, soda, and a huge, sugary dessert. They also don't ask them what exactly they meant by ‘meat.’ Pink slime burgers infused with a cocktail of powerful chemicals, including MSG, consumed at fast food outlets are very different in their nutritional impact than organic meats or artisanal cheeses served with fresh vegetables. Cutting carbs does not make chemical-laced low quality food healthy, so if you cut your carbs, do what you can to improve the quality of the foods you eat. But most of the scare studies you will see reported in the press are conducted in rodents and involved some bizarre study designs. Scientists create genetically engineered mice carrying genes that make them unable to metabolize fat properly and then feed them fat. They feed mice a lot of fructose along with their ‘high fat’ diet but neglect to mention the fructose when describing the toxic effect of the ‘high fat’ diet though there is quite a bit of evidence that fructose promotes heart disease independent of fat intake. They may feed animals shortening filled with cardio-toxic trans fats and then find that these trans fats have clogged the animals' arteries. Trans fat does this whether or not you eat it with or without carbs, though you are more likely to encounter trans fat in high carb packaged foods and in foods like fast food french fries or coffee shop pastry. Sometimes the scientists feed animals extremely high protein diets--which are quite different from the high fat diet that the low carb dieter eats. The proteins they choose are filled with high levels of minerals mice don't have the kidney's to metabolize. This leads to severe disease, but again, has nothing to do with the low carb diet and nothing to do with humans, either. Human kidneys are evolved to work well with a meat based diet. Mice you may remember are not carnivores. To read a brilliant analysis of how flawed animal studies are that connect dietary fat with heart disease read this blog post by Dr. Stephan Guyanet: Animal Models of Atherosclerosis: LDL [http://wholehealthsource.blogspot.com.au/2009/07/animal-models-of-atherosclerosis-ldl.html ] If you have a concern about the safety of your low carb diet, you might want to have a look at the list of safety guidelines I have posted on our low carb diet sister site. You'll find it here: Is Your Low Carb Diet Safe? [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19945867.php ]" - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/19066498.php]
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[Quote No.46830] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] ---Is Your Low Carb Diet Safe? From time to time extremely dangerous diets catch on which pose danger to people's healths. So to help you protect yourself against these, I'd share a few thoughts about how to construct a healthy and effective low carb diet you can eat safely for years. ---1. A low carb diet should not be a high protein diet. Too much protein raises the amount of circulating insulin in your body and contributes to the dragon's breath that is such a common, and unfortunate side effect of low carb dieting. Once you have eaten enough protein to repair your muscles and provide material from which the liver can synthsize the small amount of extra glucose your neurons may need when you are eating a very low carb diet, there's no need to eat more. You can find out exactly how much protein you need to eat using our newly redesigned Low Carb Nutritional Calculator [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/DietMakeupCalc.php ]. It now let's you calculate your protein need at any carbohydrate intake. ---2. A Very Low Carb Diet Should Be a High Fat Diet. If you are eating a diet that provides less than 80 grams of carbohydrate a day--a ketogenic diet, most of the calories in your low carb diet should be coming from fat. Fat, unlike protein, does NOT raise blood sugar or provoke any insulin response. Now that Gary Taubes has thoroughly debunked the badly conducted, politically motivated research that was used to argue that fat caused heart disease, we can all relax and enjoy the fat we eat. The exception to the goodness of fats is trans fat. And despite all the labels that claim ‘no trans fat’, any food that lists ‘hydrogenated’ fats of any type on the label does contain trans fat. There are lots of them and you should avoid eating them. ---3. A Low Carb Diet That Provides More than 120 grams of Carb a Day Should NOT Be A High Fat Diet My recent review of the research about low carb diets, conducted while writing my new book, ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’ brought home to me how important it is to remember that fat is only healthy on low carb diets that are very low in carbs. As your carbohydrate intake rises out of the ketogenic range (which extends from about 70 to 100 grams a day, depending on body size) you must cut back on your fat intake. By the time your carbs have reached 150 grams a day, your fat intake should not be higher than 30% of total calories. My new Low Carb Nutritional Calculator [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/DietMakeupCalc.php ] uses this concept to recommend how much fat you should eat at various carbohydrate intake levels.. ---4 I've Reversed My Recommendations About Supplemental B Vitamins. It's traditional to recommend that people not eating grains should supplement with B vitamins. But over the past few years new data about B vitamin supplementation has made it clear that, as has been the case with so many other vitamins, B vitamin pills may actually worsen, not improve your health. [For people with existing kidney problems for example people with diabetes] Supplementation with B vitamins has been linked to increases in the speed at which kidneys deteriorate [http://phlauntdiabetesupdates.blogspot.com.au/2010/04/vitamin-d-supplementation-hastens.html ]and to a higher risk of strokes [http://phlauntdiabetesupdates.blogspot.com.au/2012/01/supplementing-with-megadoses-of-vitamin.html ]. If you don't eat grains, get your B vitamins from cheese, yogurt, and green vegetables. ---5. Use Morton's Salt Substitute to Replace Potassium A low carb diet especially in its early phases flushes a lot of fluid out of your body. You can read why this is HERE [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19058097.php ]. The diuretic effect can cause you to lose potassium and if that happens you may get leg cramps. Sprinkling a bit of Morton's Salt Substitute on your food is all you need to do to correct any potassium imbalance--UNLESS you are taking a potassium sparing blood pressure medicine. In that case, do NOT supplement with potassium. If you aren't sure if your blood pressure medicine is potassium sparing or not, ask a pharmacist. If you are taking a potassium sparing drug you don't have to worry about losing potassium. If you are low in potassium, the usual symptom is leg cramping which resolves as soon as you consume a sprinkle of the salt substitute which is pure potassium. You can buy it in most supermarkets in the section where the salt is sold. ---6. Eat LOTS of Greens and Berries. If you only eat meat and cheese on your ‘low carb’ diet you are going to end up missing valuable nutrients. If you eat meat and greens and packaged ‘low carb’ foods full of chemicals and hidden carbs, you are also going to miss out on those nutrients--and you are going to end up gaining weight, as many packaged foods include ingredients that are forms of MSG (like hydrolyzed vegetable protein) that make you hungry. In the old days, people in the low carb community used to tell each other ‘When you visit the supermarket, Shop the edges’ . That's because, typically, fruit, veggies, meat, nuts, eggs and dairy are arranged around the outside edge of the market and all the prepared foods are in the aisles. The more you eat from the edges, the healthier you will be. Frozen veggies are fine, too. ---7. Don't Use Soy Protein Many low carb recipes tell you to use soy flour. Don't. It tastes nasty to many of us, and soy can have negative effects on your thyroid and can disturb your sex hormone balance. Whey protein powder tastes better than soy and has no hormonal effects. I use it in quite a few of my recipes. Vanilla or plain are best for cooking. If you find yourself feeling depressive after a few weeks of your low carb diet, cut out any of the soy foods you may have added, including tortillas, ‘low carb’ breads, or cereals. You may be amazed at how much cheerier you feel. ---8. Don't Cut Your Calories Below 1000 a Day. Yes, you can lose weight by starving yourself, but do you really want to lose weight in a way that may damage your metabolism and make it impossible to maintain your weight loss? The point of any weight loss diet is to learn a new way of eating that will be one you can sustain through the many years that follow your weight loss. The ugly secret, made crystal clear by all diet research, is that losing weight is easy, it's maintaining weight loss that's hard. And this is true no matter what diet you eat. In fact, the track record of low carb diets in the years after they achieve weight loss is quite poor. So why worsen what are already poor odds by eating a starvation diet that makes it even more likely you will regain whatever weight you lose? Starvation diets also raise the risk of developing nutritional deficiencies that harm your body. Worst case, they can unbalance your electrolytes in a way that can kill you. [For more information and scientific research about the safety of low carbohydrate diets in general go to http://www.phlaunt.com/diabetes/19066498.php ]" - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19945867.php ]
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[Quote No.46831] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] ---Don't Be Fooled by Quick Losses and Devastating Gains: After a week of doing a low carb diet, new dieters are filled with excitement. They've lost anywhere from four to ten or even twelve pounds. They conclude, ‘This diet works!’ and their enthusiasm after that quick weight loss may motivate them to stick with the diet even when the weight loss slows down to normal levels--3 to 8 pounds a month. But there's a dark side to this instant weight loss. Slip up and eat a ‘normal’ diet for a day and what happens? The lost pounds are back, all five or ten of them! The feeling of failure and distress can set the dieter on a spiral of binging and despair that quickly leads to their regaining of all the weight lost through weeks of dieting. In fact, both the joy and the despair you feel in response to this rapid loss or gain is misplaced. The quick losses and gains are almost entirely water. Whether you are low carbing or not, you must burn off 3,500 more calories than you take in to lose a pound of fat and you must eat 3,500 calories more than you need to gain a pound. Despite the hype in the diet doctors' books, low carbing does not repeal the basic laws of thermodynamics. So what is that four to ten pounds of ‘easy go, easy come’ weight all about? ---What you REALLY Lost or Gained: When you cut the carbs out of your diet, your body empties out the ‘emergency’ stores of carbohydrate it keeps in the liver and muscles in the form of a substance called glycogen. Glycogen is a normal part of our metabolism and allows us to do energy-intensive things like sprinting, for example, by letting us draw on the carbs stored in our muscles for energy. More importantly the glycogen stored in our liver allows us to keep our brain functioning. A person who is not low carbing needs 100 gms of glucose a day merely to supply the brain's basic needs. If the body can't get glucose from the diet it has two choices: use stored carbohydrate--our friend glycogen again, or convert dietary or muscle protein into carbohydrate using a lengthy process called ‘gluconeogenesis’ which takes place in the liver. Because the body wants to avoid using its own muscle fibers for fuel, it does what it can to keep that liver glycogen store filled up. Medical textbooks usually tell us that a typical 150 lb man is carrying about three quarters of a pound of glycogen, but in my researches for my new book ‘Diet 101:The Truth About Low Carb Diets’ I found some solid evidence that suggests that this estimate only applies to the young, lean, male college students who were research subjects in the 1950s and '60s. If you are overweight, especially if you got overweight eating a diet full of starch, sugar, and high fructose corn syrup, it is very likely that you are carrying a lot more glycogen than that estimate. And the news gets worse, because it turns out that each gram of glycogen is bound to four grams of water. This means that when your liver and muscles are charged up with glycogen you gain four times the weight of that glycogen in water. When you start a very low carb diet you cut off the body's supply of dietary carbohydrate and this leads to a rapid emptying of these liver and muscle glycogen stores. And when you lose that glycogen, you also lose the associated water. That's the reason why, during the first couple days of a low carb diet, you lose weight so dramatically. It's also why you may feel slimmer and lose ‘inches.’ You haven't lost fat. You've simply squeezed out the water and glycogen in your muscles and liver. But what happens when you go off the diet for even so little as a single meal? If you eat a significant amount of carbs, your liver and muscles grab glucose from your bloodstream to replenish that emergency stock. As they do this, four grams of water join each gram of glycogen and, as fast as you can say, ‘Omigawd, I cheated!’ the pounds you lost at the very beginning of the diet pile back on. ---How many carbs does it take to replenish your glycogen? Not too many. If you were only carrying that three quarters of a pound of glycogen the textbook's 150 lb. man would carry in his liver, you'd only need about 70 grams of carbohydrate to start refilling it. Chow down some french fries and a regular soda and you're there. ---Do you lose any REAL fat weight on a Low Carb Diet? Probably not in the first three days--unless you cut 1200 calories out of your usual diet, too. But once you have gotten through the first week or two another benefit of low carbing kicks in that does make it much easier for most people to cut out the calories they need to cut to lose real fat. That's because when you cut out your carbs you eliminate the blood sugar swings that cause hunger in most people. The cravings you used to get when dieting may fade out in as little as two weeks. When you stop eating in response to those nasty hunger cravings, you will find it much easier to eat a whole lot less than you used to. It is the drop in calorie intake that follows this drop in hunger that that results in the very real and often dramatic weight loss so many long-term low carbers report. ---Will you gain it all back when you go off the diet? Many books and experienced low carb dieters warn that low carbing brings with it a ‘devil's bargain.’ They tell you that you can lose all the weight you want on their diet but if you do, you must make low carbing a ‘way of eating’ for the rest of your life. The instant weight regain that low carbers experience tends to confirm that this is true, which can be very frightening if for one reason or another the dieter decides to return to a balanced-type diet. But it turns out that while it is true that many lapsed low carb dieters DO regain a lot of weight--often ending up heavier than they started, the reason has nothing to do with the fact that they were eating a low carb diet. The real problem is that eating very low carb diets teaches people to eat a lot of fat, so that erstwhile low carb dieters who go off their diets but keep eating the high fat foods appropriate only to a low carb diet end up boosting their calories. If they don't, once they refill their glycogen and put on the extra water weight associated with it they will not gain any more weight than can be explained by the old, boring equation, one pound of fat = 3,500 calories. There's plenty of research documenting this, which you can read about in ‘Diet 101’. The take-home message from this is if you are eating a very low carb diet you need to remember every time that every time you get on the scale your REAL weight--the weight you will be when you stop dieting-- is whatever you weigh now plus whatever you lost during the first weeks of the diet when glycogen burns away. If you go off plan for a day, don't panic when you step on the scale. That instant three pounds is only water. Compare what you weigh--with the water--to what you weighed the last time you went off plan. It's less, isn't it? And that is REAL weight loss!" - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19058097.php ]
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[Quote No.46832] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Those foods [the so-called 'bad carbohydrates' - like sugar, refined white flour, high-calorie-low nutrition density junk food - rather than the good carbs - like vegetables, fruit, nuts, etc] are bad for your health, bad for your energy level, bad for your mental state, bad for your figure, bad for your career prospects, bad for your sex life, bad for your digestion, bad for your blood chemistry, bad for your heart. What I'm saying is that they're bad." - Robert Coleman Atkins
(1930 - 2003), Robert Coleman Atkins was an American physician and cardiologist famous for his low-carbohydrate diet for losing weight and improving heart health. Quote from his book, 'Dr. Atkins New Diet Revolution' (2002).
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[Quote No.46833] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] A realistic monthly weight loss goal for the low carb dieter who has been dieting for more than two weeks would appear to lie between 2 and 6 lbs, with heavier dieters losing a bit more than thinner ones. This isn't the dramatic weight loss most low carbers expect based on the big losses that many dieters experience in their first two weeks, but the amounts shown here match those reported by dieters in all successful weight loss programs and are in line with the amounts of weight that you can expect to lose on any diet, once it is fat rather than water you are losing." - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected, best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19057960.php ]
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[Quote No.46834] Need Area: Food > General
"[Healthy, natural nutrition and diet:] Successful Dieters Keep Aware of what they Weigh: ... my own experience over a lifetime of controlling my weight has been that it’s a lot easier to maintain a significant weight loss if you make yourself get on the scale on a regular basis and put yourself back onto a weight loss regimen any time you regain three to five pounds that aren't just water weight. Losing three to five pounds is almost always doable and can be done within a month or two. But if you let the weight regain creep up to ten or twenty pounds, losing it again may become an overwhelming and depressing task." - Jenny Ruhl
Author of the highly respected, best-sellers, ‘Blood Sugar 101: What They Don't Tell You About Diabetes’ and ‘Diet 101: The Truth About Low Carb Diets’. [http://www.phlaunt.com/lowcarb/19058665.php ]
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