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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.52507] Need Area: Fun > General
"A man [or woman] should hear a little music, read a little poetry, and see a fine picture every day of his [or her] life, in order that worldly cares may not obliterate the sense of the beautiful...in the human soul." - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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[Quote No.52520] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the difficulties and challenges, accompanied by growing-pains like self-doubt, failure, mistakes, waste and frustration, that transforming ourselves into our better selves often necessitates as we pursue our dreams!]

'On Pain'

Your pain is the breaking of the shell that encloses
your understanding.

Even as the stone of the fruit must break, that its
heart may stand in the sun, so must you know pain.

And could you keep your heart in wonder at the
daily miracles of your life, your pain would not seem
less wondrous than your joy;

And you would accept the seasons of your heart,
even as you have always accepted the seasons that
pass over your fields.

And you would watch with serenity through the
winters of your grief.

Much of your pain is self-chosen.

It is the bitter potion by which the physician within you heals your sick self.

Therefore trust the physician, and drink his remedy
in silence and tranquillity:

For his hand, though heavy and hard, is guided by
the tender hand of the Unseen,

And the cup he brings, though it burn your lips, has
been fashioned of the clay which the Potter has
moistened with His own sacred tears.

" - Khalil Gibran

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[Quote No.52527] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the value of 'shadow' - challenges and pain - as well as 'light' - ease and pleasure.]

'A Tear And A Smile'

I would not exchange the sorrows of my heart
For the joys of the multitude.
And I would not have the tears that sadness makes
To flow from my every part turn into laughter.

I would that my life remain a tear and a smile.

A tear to purify my heart and give me understanding
Of life's secrets and hidden things.
A smile to draw me nigh to the sons of my kind and
To be a symbol of my glorification of the gods.

A tear to unite me with those of broken heart;
A smile to be a sign of my joy in existence.

I would rather that I died in yearning and longing than that I live
Weary and despairing.

I want the hunger for love and beauty to be in the
Depths of my spirit, for I have seen those who are
Satisfied the most wretched of people.
I have heard the sigh of those in yearning and
Longing, and it is sweeter than the sweetest melody.

With evening's coming the flower folds her petals
And sleeps, embracingher longing.
At morning's approach she opens her lips to meet
The sun's kiss.

The life of a flower is longing and fulfilment.
A tear and a smile.

The waters of the sea become vapor and rise and come
Together and area cloud.

And the cloud floats above the hills and valleys
Until it meets the gentle breeze, then falls weeping
To the fields and joins with brooks and rivers to
Return to the sea, its home.

The life of clouds is a parting and a meeting.
A tear and a smile.

And so does the spirit become separated from
The greater spirit to move in the world of matter
And pass as a cloud over the mountain of sorrow
And the plains of joy to meet the breeze of death
And return whence it came.

To the ocean of Love and Beauty ---- to God.

" - Khalil Gibran

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[Quote No.52562] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about being relaxed and enjoying life more.]

'Instants' [Moments]

If I could live again my life,
In the next - I'll try,
- to make more mistakes,
I won't try to be so perfect,
I'll be more relaxed,
I'll be more full - than I am now,
In fact, I'll take fewer things seriously,
I'll be less hygenic,
I'll take more risks,
I'll take more trips,
I'll watch more sunsets,
I'll climb more mountains,
I'll swim more rivers,
I'll go to more places - I've never been,
I'll eat more ice creams and less (lime) beans,
I'll have more real problems - and less imaginary ones,
I was one of those people who live
prudent and prolific lives -
each minute of his life,
Of course I had moments of joy - but,
if I could go back I'll try to have only good moments,

If you don't know - that's what life is made of,
Don't lose the now!

I was one of those who never goes anywhere
without a thermometer,
without a hot-water bottle,
and without an umbrella and without a parachute,

If I could live again - I will travel light,
If I could live again - I'll try to work bare feet
at the beginning of spring till
the end of autumn,
I'll ride more carts,
I'll watch more sunrises and play with more children,
If I have the life to live - but now I am 85,
- and I know that I am dying ...

" - Jorge Luis Borges
This poem is usually attributed to Jorge Luis Borges, although that is disputed, refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moments_(poem) .
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[Quote No.52571] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about finding something you are passionate about that engages you so you forget time - what Joseph Campbell called 'following your bliss', Abraham Maslow called 'peak experiences' and what positive psychologist, Mihály Csíkszentmihályi, called 'flow'.]

'Get Drunk'

Always be drunk.
That's it!
The great imperative!
In order not to feel
Time's horrid fardel
bruise your shoulders,
grinding you into the earth,
Get drunk and stay that way.
On what?
On wine, poetry, virtue, whatever.
But get drunk.
And if you sometimes happen to wake up
on the porches of a palace,
in the green grass of a ditch,
in the dismal loneliness of your own room,
your drunkenness gone or disappearing,
ask the wind,
the wave,
the star,
the bird,
the clock,
ask everything that flees,
everything that groans
or rolls
or sings,
everything that speaks,
ask what time it is;
and the wind,
the wave,
the star,
the bird,
the clock
will answer you:
'Time to get drunk!'
Don't be martyred slaves of Time,
Get drunk!
Stay drunk!
On wine, virtue, poetry, whatever!

" - Charles Baudelaire
(1821 - 1867), poet. ['fardel' is an archaic noun, meaning - a bundle or collection.]
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[Quote No.52835] Need Area: Fun > General
"It is a celebrated thought of Socrates, that if all the misfortunes of mankind were cast into a public stock, in order to be equally distributed among the whole species, those who now think themselves the most unhappy would prefer the share they are already possessed of, before that which would fall to them by such a division." - Joseph Addison
(1672 - 1719) English essayist
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[Quote No.52580] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- on the incredible power and importance of imagination.]

'On Imagination'

Thy various works, imperial queen, we see,
How bright their forms! how deck'd with pomp by thee!
Thy wond'rous acts in beauteous order stand,
And all attest how potent is thine hand.

From Helicon's refulgent heights attend,
Ye sacred choir, and my attempts befriend:
To tell her glories with a faithful tongue,
Ye blooming graces, triumph in my song.

Now here, now there, the roving Fancy flies,
Till some lov'd object strikes her wand'ring eyes,
Whose silken fetters all the senses bind,
And soft captivity involves the mind.

Imagination! who can sing thy force?
Or who describe the swiftness of thy course?
Soaring through air to find the bright abode,
Th' empyreal palace of the thund'ring God,
We on thy pinions can surpass the wind,
And leave the rolling universe behind:
From star to star the mental optics rove,
Measure the skies, and range the realms above.
There in one view we grasp the mighty whole,
Or with new worlds amaze th' unbounded soul.

Though Winter frowns to Fancy's raptur'd eyes
The fields may flourish, and gay scenes arise;
The frozen deeps may break their iron bands,
And bid their waters murmur o'er the sands.
Fair Flora may resume her fragrant reign,
And with her flow'ry riches deck the plain;
Sylvanus may diffuse his honours round,
And all the forest may with leaves be crown'd:
Show'rs may descend, and dews their gems disclose,
And nectar sparkle on the blooming rose.

Such is thy pow'r, nor are thine orders vain,
O thou the leader of the mental train:
In full perfection all thy works are wrought,
And thine the sceptre o'er the realms of thought.
Before thy throne the subject-passions bow,
Of subject-passions sov'reign ruler thou;
At thy command joy rushes on the heart,
And through the glowing veins the spirits dart.

Fancy might now her silken pinions try
To rise from earth, and sweep th' expanse on high:
From Tithon's bed now might Aurora rise,
Her cheeks all glowing with celestial dies,
While a pure stream of light o'erflows the skies.
The monarch of the day I might behold,
And all the mountains tipt with radiant gold,
But I reluctant leave the pleasing views,
Which Fancy dresses to delight the Muse;
Winter austere forbids me to aspire,
And northern tempests damp the rising fire;
They chill the tides of Fancy's flowing sea,
Cease then, my song, cease the unequal lay.

" - Phillis Wheatley
(1753 – 1784), although she was an African slave, she was one of the best-known poets in pre-nineteenth-century America. Source: 'Poems on Various Subjects Religious and Moral' (1773).
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[Quote No.52584] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about using fantasy - imagination to relieve boredom and increase pleasure regardless of outward circumstances.]

'Fancy'

Ever let the Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home:
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth,
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth;
Then let winged Fancy wander
Through the thought still spread beyond her:
Open wide the mind's cage-door,
She'll dart forth, and cloudward soar.
O sweet Fancy! let her loose;
Summer's joys are spoilt by use,
And the enjoying of the Spring
Fades as does its blossoming;
Autumn's red-lipp'd fruitage too,
Blushing through the mist and dew,
Cloys with tasting: What do then?
Sit thee by the ingle, when
The sear faggot blazes bright,
Spirit of a winter's night;
When the soundless earth is muffled,
And the caked snow is shuffled
From the ploughboy's heavy shoon;
When the Night doth meet the Noon
In a dark conspiracy
To banish Even from her sky.
Sit thee there, and send abroad,
With a mind self-overaw'd,
Fancy, high-commission'd:- send her!
She has vassals to attend her:
She will bring, in spite of frost,
Beauties that the earth hath lost;
She will bring thee, all together,
All delights of summer weather;
All the buds and bells of May,
From dewy sward or thorny spray;
All the heaped Autumn's wealth,
With a still, mysterious stealth:
She will mix these pleasures up
Like three fit wines in a cup,
And thou shalt quaff it:— thou shalt hear
Distant harvest-carols clear;
Rustle of the reaped corn;
Sweet birds antheming the morn:
And, in the same moment, hark!
'Tis the early April lark,
Or the rooks, with busy caw,
Foraging for sticks and straw.
Thou shalt, at one glance, behold
The daisy and the marigold;
White-plum'd lillies, and the first
Hedge-grown primrose that hath burst;
Shaded hyacinth, alway
Sapphire queen of the mid-May;
And every leaf, and every flower
Pearled with the self-same shower.
Thou shalt see the field-mouse peep
Meagre from its celled sleep;
And the snake all winter-thin
Cast on sunny bank its skin;
Freckled nest-eggs thou shalt see
Hatching in the hawthorn-tree,
When the hen-bird's wing doth rest
Quiet on her mossy nest;
Then the hurry and alarm
When the bee-hive casts its swarm;
Acorns ripe down-pattering,
While the autumn breezes sing.

Oh, sweet Fancy! let her loose;
Every thing is spoilt by use:
Where's the cheek that doth not fade,
Too much gaz'd at? Where's the maid
Whose lip mature is ever new?
Where's the eye, however blue,
Doth not weary? Where's the face
One would meet in every place?
Where's the voice, however soft,
One would hear so very oft?
At a touch sweet Pleasure melteth
Like to bubbles when rain pelteth.
Let, then, winged Fancy find
Thee a mistress to thy mind:
Dulcet-ey'd as Ceres' daughter,
Ere the God of Torment taught her
How to frown and how to chide;
With a waist and with a side
White as Hebe's, when her zone
Slipt its golden clasp, and down
Fell her kirtle to her feet,
While she held the goblet sweet
And Jove grew languid. - Break the mesh
Of the Fancy's silken leash;
Quickly break her prison-string
And such joys as these she'll bring. -
Let the winged Fancy roam,
Pleasure never is at home.

" - John Keats
(1795 - 1821). First published 1820. [refer http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/fancy ]
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[Quote No.52586] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about fantasy - imagination being able to help our selves experience both good and bad regardless of outward circumstances.]

'Ode to Fancy'

O parent of each lovely Muse,
Thy spirit o'er my soul diffuse,
O'er all my artless songs preside,
My footsteps to thy temple guide.
To offer at thy turf-built shrine,
In golden cups no costly wine,
No murder'd fatling of the flock,
But flowers and honey from the rock.
O Nymph with loosely-flowing hair,
With buskin'd leg, and bosom bare,
Thy waist with myrtle-girdle bound,
Thy brows with Indian feathers crown'd,
Waving in thy snowy hand
An all-commanding magic wand,
Of pow'r to bid fresh gardens blow,
'Mid cheerless Lapland's barren snow,
Whose rapid wings thy flight convey
Through air, and over earth and sea,
While the vast various landscape lies
Conspicuous to thy piercing eyes.
O lover of the desert, hail!
Say, in what deep and pathless vale,
Or on what hoary mountain's side,
'Mid fall of waters, you reside,
'Mid broken rocks, a rugged scene,
With green and grassy dales between,
'Mid forests dark of aged oak,
Ne'er echoing with the woodman's stroke,
Where never human art appear'd,
Nor ev'n one straw-roof'd cot was rear'd,
Where Nature seems to sit alone,
Majestic on a craggy throne;
Tell me the path, sweet wand'rer, tell,
To thy unknown sequester'd cell,
Where woodbines cluster round the door,
Where shells and moss o'erlay the floor,
And on whose top an hawthorn blows,
Amid whose thickly-woven boughs
Some nightingale still builds her nest,
Each evening warbling thee to rest:
There lay me by the haunted stream,
Rapt in some wild, poetic dream,
In converse while methinks I rove
With Spenser through a fairy grove;
'Till suddenly awoke, I hear
Strange whisper'd music in my ear,
And my glad soul in bliss is drown'd
By the sweetly-soothing sound!
Me, Goddess, by the right-hand lead,
Sometimes through the yellow mead,
Where Joy and white-rob'd Peace resort,
And Venus keeps her festive court,
Where Mirth and Youth each evening meet,
And lightly trip with nimble feet,
Nodding their lily-crowned heads,
Where Laughter rose-lipp'd Hebe leads;
Where Echo walks steep hills among,
List'ning to the shepherd's song:
Yet not those flowery fields of joy
Can long my pensive mind employ,
Haste, Fancy, from these scenes of folly,
To meet the matron Melancholy,
Goddess of the tearful eye,
That loves to fold her arms, and sigh!
Let us with silent footsteps go
To charnels and the house of woe,
To Gothic churches, vaults, and tombs,
Where each sad night some virgin comes,
With throbbing breast, and faded cheek,
Her promis'd bridegroom's urn to seek;
Or to some abbey's mould'ring tow'rs,
Where, to avoid cold wintry show'rs,
The naked beggar shivering lies,
While whistling tempests round her rise,
And trembles lest the tottering wall
Should on her sleeping infants fall.

Now let us louder strike the lyre,
For my heart glows with martial fire,
I feel, I feel, with sudden heat,
My big tumultuous bosom beat,
The trumpet's clangours pierce my ear,
A thousand widows' shrieks I hear,
Give me another horse, I cry,
Lo! the base Gallic squadrons fly;
Whence is this rage?--what spirit, say,
To battle hurries me away?
'Tis Fancy, in her fiery car,
Transports me to the thickest war,
There whirls me o'er the hills of slain,
Where Tumult and Destruction reign;
Where, mad with pain, the wounded steed
Tramples the dying and the dead;
Where giant Terror stalks around,
With sullen joy surveys the ground,
And, pointing to th' ensanguin'd field,
Shakes his dreadful Gorgon-shield!

O guide me from this horrid scene
To high-arch'd walks and alleys green,
Which lovely Laura seeks, to shun
The fervours of the mid-day sun;
The pangs of absence, O remove!
For thou canst place me near my love,
Canst fold in visionary bliss,
And let me think I steal a kiss,
While her ruby lips dispense
Luscious nectar's quintessence!
When young-ey'd Spring profusely throws
From her green lap the pink and rose,
When the soft turtle of the dale
To Summer tells her tender tale,
When Autumn cooling caverns seeks,
And stains with wine his jolly cheeks;
When Winter, like poor pilgrim old,
Shakes his silver beard with cold;
At every season let my ear
Thy solemn whispers, Fancy, hear.
O warm, enthusiastic maid,
Without thy powerful, vital aid,
That breathes an energy divine,
That gives a soul to every line,
Ne'er may I strive with lips profane
To utter an unhallow'd strain,
Nor dare to touch the sacred string,
Save when with smiles thou bid'st me sing.
O hear our prayer, O hither come
From thy lamented Shakespear's tomb,
On which thou lov'st to sit at eve,
Musing o'er thy darling's grave;
O queen of numbers, once again
Animate some chosen swain,
Who, fill'd with unexhausted fire,
May boldly smite the sounding lyre,
Who with some new, unequall'd song,
May rise above the rhyming throng,
O'er all our list'ning passions reign,
O'erwhelm our souls with joy and pain;
With terror shake, with pity move,
Rouse with revenge, or melt with love.
O deign t' attend his evening walk,
With him in groves and grottoes talk;
Teach him to scorn with frigid art
Feebly to touch th' unraptur'd heart;
Like lightning, let his mighty verse
The bosom's inmost foldings pierce;
With native beauties win applause,
Beyond cold critics' studied laws;
O let each Muse's fame increase,
O bid Britannia rival Greece!

" - Joseph Warton
(1722 - 1800). First published in 1744. [Refer http://rpo.library.utoronto.ca/poems/ode-fancy ]
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[Quote No.52617] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about dissatisfaction-discontent and envy-jealousy.]

'Anywhere Out of the World'

Life is a hospital where every patient is obsessed by the desire of changing beds. One would like to suffer opposite the stove, another is sure he would get well beside the window.

It always seems to me that I should be happy anywhere but where I am...

" - Charles Baudelaire
(1821 - 1867), Charles Pierre Baudelaire was a French poet, essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. This quote is just the first few lines of this poem.
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[Quote No.52623] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:]

'Barter'

Life has loveliness to sell,
All beautiful and splendid things,
Blue waves whitened on a cliff,
Soaring fire that sways and sings,
And children's faces looking up
Holding wonder like a cup.

Life has loveliness to sell,
Music like a curve of gold,
Scent of pine trees in the rain,
Eyes that love you, arms that hold,
And for your spirit's still delight,
Holy thoughts that star the night.

Spend all you have for loveliness,
Buy it and never count the cost;
For one white singing hour of peace
Count many a year of strife well lost,
And for a breath of ecstasy
Give all you have been, or could be.

" - Sara Teasdale
Poet. From her poem collection, 'Love Songs'.
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[Quote No.52624] Need Area: Fun > General
"I make the most of all that comes and the least of all that goes." - Sara Teasdale
Poet
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[Quote No.52628] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Occasionally we all feel like...] My soul is a broken field, plowed by pain. [These feelings are all part of developing empathy and compassion for others and ourselves and testing ideas to learn what works to give us greater choice and control over our lives and happiness in a process of self-evolution and 'the getting of wisdom' for the good of all.]" - Sara Teasdale

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[Quote No.52636] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the value of imagination, fantasy, experience and wisdom:]

I have no riches but my thoughts,
Yet these are wealth enough for me.

" - Sara Teasdale

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[Quote No.52653] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about learning from mistakes and turning lemons into lemonade!]

'Hard Knocks'

I'm not the man to say that failure's sweet,
Nor tell a chap to laugh when things go wrong;
I know it hurts to have to take defeat
An' no one likes to loose before a throng;
It isn't very pleasant not to win
When you have done the very best you could;
But if you're down, get up and buckle in -
A lickin' often does a fellow good.

I've seen some chaps who never knew their power
Until somebody knocked 'em to the floor;
I've known men who discovered in an hour
A courage they had never shown before.
I've seen 'em rise from failure to the top
By doin' things they hadn't understood
Before the day disaster made 'em drop -
A lickin' often does a fellow good.

Success is not the teacher, wise an' true,
That gruff old failure is, remember that;
She's much too apt to make a fool of you,
Which isn’t true of blows that knock you flat.
Hard knocks are painful things an' hard to bear,
An' most of us would dodge 'em if we could;
There’s something mighty broadening in care -
A lickin’ often does a fellow good.

" - Edgar Albert Guest
(1881 - 1959) American author and poet
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[Quote No.52713] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the value of both good and bad.]

'The Guest House'

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
As an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they're a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

" - Rumi
(1207 – 1273), Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi - Persian poet, Islamic dervish, Sufi mystic and jurist. Translated by Coleman Barks
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[Quote No.52731] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:]

'Laugh and be Merry'

Laugh and be merry, remember, better the world with a song,
Better the world with a blow in the teeth of a wrong.
Laugh, for the time is brief, a thread the length of a span.
Laugh and be proud to belong to the old proud pageant of man.

Laugh and be merry: remember, in olden time.
God made Heaven and Earth for joy He took in a rhyme,
Made them, and filled them full with the strong red wine of His mirth
The splendid joy of the stars: the joy of the earth.

So we must laugh and drink from the deep blue cup of the sky,
Join the jubilant song of the great stars sweeping by,
Laugh, and battle, and work, and drink of the wine outpoured
In the dear green earth, the sign of the joy of the Lord.

Laugh and be merry together, like brothers akin,
Guesting awhile in the rooms of a beautiful inn,
Glad till the dancing stops, and the lilt of the music ends.
Laugh till the game is played; and be you merry, my friends.

" - John Masefield
(1878 - 1967), John Edward Masefield, OM was an English poet and writer, and Poet Laureate of the United Kingdom from 1930 until his death in 1967.
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[Quote No.52777] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A wise, imaginative person can use his or her intelligence to find a perspective or way to enjoy all experiences and seasons of life!] The question, ‘Which is the happiest season of life,’ being referred to an aged man, he replied: ‘When spring comes, and in the soft air the buds are breaking on the trees, and they are coved with blossoms, I think, 'How beautiful is Spring!' And when the summer comes, and covers the trees with its heavy foliage, and singing birds are among the ranches, I think, 'How beautiful is Summer!' When autumn loads them with golden fruit, and their leaves bear the gorgeous tint of frost, I think, 'How beautiful is Autumn!' And when it is sere winter, and there is neither foliage nor fruit, then I look up through the leafless branches, as I never could until now, and see the stars shine.’ " - Unknown

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[Quote No.52797] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:-]

'Wise Wasting Of Days'

To awaken each morning with a smile brightening my face,
to greet the day with reverence, for the opportunities it contains;
to approach my work with a clean mind;
to hold ever before me, even in the doing of little things, the Ultimate Purpose toward which I am working;
to meet men and women with laughter on my lips and love in my heart,
to be gentle, kind and courteous through all the hours;
to approach the night with weariness that ever woos sleep and the joy that comes from work well done --
this is how I desire to waste wisely my days.

" - Thomas Dekker
(circa 1572 – 1632), English Elizabethan dramatist and pamphleteer, a versatile and prolific writer whose career spanned several decades and brought him into contact with many of the period's most famous dramatists.
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[Quote No.52799] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:-]

'World We Make'

We make the world in which we live
By what we gather and what we give,
By our daily deeds and the things we say,
By what we keep or we cast away.

We make our world by the beauty we see
In a skylark's song or lilac tree,
In a butterfly's wing, in the pale moons' rise,
And the wonder that lingers in midnight skies.

We make our world by the life we lead,
By the friends we have, by the books we read,
By the pity we show in the hour of care,
By the loads we lift and the love we share.

We make our world by the goals we pursue,
By the heights we seek and the higher view,
By hopes and dreams that reach the sun
And a will to fight till the heights are won.

What is the place in which we dwell,
A hut or a palace, a heaven or hell
We gather and scatter, we take and we give,
We make our world -- and there we live.

" - Alfred Grant Walton

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[Quote No.52822] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: if you want to be happy don't be envious or jealous]

'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired')

...

...If you compare yourself with others, you may become vain and bitter; for always there will be greater and lesser persons than yourself.

...

" - Max Ehrmann
(1872 – 1945) American writer, poet, and attorney from Terre Haute, Indiana, widely known for his 1927 prose poem 'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired'). He often wrote on spiritual themes. [In 1956, the Reverend Frederick Kates, rector of Saint Paul's Church in Baltimore, Maryland, included 'Desiderata' in a compilation of devotional materials for his congregation. The compilation included the church's foundation date: 'Old Saint Paul's Church, Baltimore A.D. 1692'. Consequently, the date of the text's authorship was (and still is) widely mistaken as 1692, the year of the church's foundation. Refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desiderata ]
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[Quote No.52828] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:]

'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired')

...

Beyond a wholesome discipline, be gentle with yourself. You are a child of the universe, no less than the trees and the stars; you have a right to be here. And whether or not it is clear to you, no doubt the universe is unfolding as it should.

...With all its sham, drudgery, and broken dreams, it is still a beautiful world. Be cheerful. Strive to be happy.

" - Max Ehrmann
(1872 – 1945) American writer, poet, and attorney from Terre Haute, Indiana, widely known for his 1927 prose poem 'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired'). He often wrote on spiritual themes. [In 1956, the Reverend Frederick Kates, rector of Saint Paul's Church in Baltimore, Maryland, included 'Desiderata' in a compilation of devotional materials for his congregation. The compilation included the church's foundation date: 'Old Saint Paul's Church, Baltimore A.D. 1692'. Consequently, the date of the text's authorship was (and still is) widely mistaken as 1692, the year of the church's foundation. Refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desiderata ]
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[Quote No.52862] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the importance of what you focus your imagination, attention and energy on, if you want to create happy feelings in yourself and others.]

'Thinking Happiness'

Think of the things that make you happy,
Not the things that make you sad;
Think of the kind and true in mankind,
Not its sordid side and bad;

Think of the blessings that surround you,
Not the ones that are denied;
Think of the virtues of your friendships,
Not the weak and faulty side;

Think of the gains you've made in business,
Not the losses you've incurred;
Think of the good of you that's spoken,
Not some cruel, hostile word;

Think of the days of health and pleasure,
Not the days of woe and pain;
Think of the days alive with sunshine,
Not the dismal days of rain;

Think of the hopes that lie before you,
Not the waste that lies behind you;
Think of the treasures you have gathered,
Not the ones you've failed to find;

...

" - Robert E. Farley
Poet
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[Quote No.52866] Need Area: Fun > General
"When we long for life without difficulties [adversities, challenges, problems, mistakes, pain, etc], remind us that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure [and that these difficulties show us where we can improve and give us opportunities to better understand, experiment with and perfect methods to overcome these weaknesses in ourselves for the betterment of all in the future]!!!" - Peter Marshall

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[Quote No.52869] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the joys of living, working and making a contribution to meeting the needs of humankind.]

'It's Simply Great'

It's great to be alive, and be -
A part of all that's going on;
To live and work and feel and see -
Life lived each day from early dawn;
To rise and with the morning light -
Go forth until the hours grow late,
Then joyously return at night -
And rest from honest toil - it's great!

It's great to be a living part -
Of all the surging world alive,
And lend a hand in field and mart, -
A worker in this human hive;
To live and earn and dare to do, -
Nor ever shirk or deviate
From course or purpose we pursue! -
Until the goal is won - it's great!

It's great to realize that we -
Are of a latent power possessed
To be what we are willed to be, -
And equal unto any test;
That of ourselves we may achieve -
To worthy deeds and high estate,
If we but in our powers believe -
It can and will be done - it's great!

It's great and wonderful to know -
That all we have to do is do,
That if we will to grow we'll grow, -
And reach the mark we have to view;
To know that we're a vital part -
Of all that is, nor hesitate
With all of skill and mind and heart -
To work and win - it's simply great!

" - Sidney Warren Mase

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[Quote No.52896] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the joys of imagination - memory and fantasy]

'Contentment'

My mind to me a kingdom is;
Such perfect joy therein I find
As far excels all earthly bliss
That God or Nature hath assigned;
Though much I want that most would have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

Content I live; this is my stay, -
I seek no more than may suffice.
I press to bear no haughty sway;
Look, what I lack my mind supplies.
Lo, thus I triumph like a king,
Content with that my mind doth bring.

I laugh not at another's loss,
I grudge not at another's gain;
No worldly wave my mind can toss;
I brook that is another's bane.
I fear no foe, nor fawn on friend;
I loathe not life, nor dread mine end.

My wealth is health and perfect ease;
My conscience clear my chief defense;
I never seek by bribes to please
Nor by desert to give offense.
Thus do I live, thus will I die;
Would all did so as well as I!

" - Edward Dyer
(1545-1607)
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[Quote No.52900] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about that all things are temporary and things change - bad can become good and good can become bad and few things are either pure good or pure bad.]

'Times Go By Turns'

The lopped tree in time may grow again;
Most naked plants renew both fruit and flower;
The sorest wight may find release of pain,
The driest soil suck in some moist'ning shower;
Times go by turns and chances change by course,
From foul to fair, from better hap to worse.

The sea of Fortune doth not ever flow,
She draws her favors to the lowest ebb;
Her time hath equal times to come and go,
Her loom doth weave the fine and coarsest web;
No joy so great but runneth to an end,
No hap so hard but may in fine amend.

Not always fall of leaf nor ever spring,
No endless night yet not eternal day;
The saddest birds a season find to sing,
The roughest storm a calm may soon allay;
Thus with succeeding turns God tempereth all,
That man may hope to rise yet fear to fall.

A chance may win that by mischance was lost;
The well that holds no great, takes little fish;
In some things all, in all things none are crossed,
Few all they need, but none have all they wish;
Unmeddled joys here to no man befall,
Who least hath some, who most hath never all.

" - Robert Southwell
(circa 1561 – 1595), also Saint Robert Southwell, was an English Roman Catholic priest of the Jesuit Order. He was also a poet and clandestine missionary in post-Reformation England. After being arrested and tortured by Sir Richard Topcliffe, Southwell was tried and convicted of high treason for his links to the Holy See. On 21 February 1595, Southwell was hanged, drawn and quartered at Tyburn. In 1970, he was canonised by Pope Paul VI as one of the Forty Martyrs of England and Wales.
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[Quote No.52916] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the importance of 'negative-bad' as well as 'positive-good' experiences for there are advantages in adversities, blessings in burdens, lessons in laments, positives in problems, etc.]

'Blessed Are They'

...

Yea, truly, though joy's note be sweet,
Life does not thrill to joy alone.
The harp is incomplete
That has no deeper tone.

Unclouded sunshine overmuch
Falls vainly on the barren plain;
But fruitful is the touch
Of sunshine after rain!

Who only scans the heavens by day
Their story but half reads, and mars;
Let him learn how to say,
'The night is full of stars!'

...

" - Rossiter Worthington Raymond
(1840 – 1918) American mining engineer, legal scholar and author. At his memorial, the President of Lehigh University described him as 'one of the most remarkable cases of versatility that our country has ever seen - sailor, soldier, engineer, lawyer, orator, editor, novelist, story-teller, poet, biblical critic, theologian, teacher, chess-player - he was superior in each capacity. What he did, he always did well.'
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[Quote No.52942] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about how many believe that the goal of life is to seek pleasure and avoid pain.]

'An Essay on Man: Epistle II'

...
Self-love and reason to one end aspire,
Pain their aversion, pleasure their desire;

...

" - Alexander Pope
(1688–1744), English poet
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[Quote No.52943] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about how while many believe that the goal of life is to seek pleasure and avoid pain, it is probably healthier if there is a blend of both to ensure good is appreciated and compassion for others enduring bad is developed.]

'An Essay on Man: Epistle II'

...
Self-love and reason to one end aspire,
Pain their aversion, pleasure their desire;

...

Love, hope, and joy, fair pleasure's smiling train,
Hate, fear, and grief, the family of pain,
These mix'd with art, and to due bounds confin'd,
Make and maintain the balance of the mind:
The lights and shades, whose well accorded strife
Gives all the strength and colour of our life.

...

" - Alexander Pope
(1688–1744), English poet
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[Quote No.52944] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about one interpretation of the eternal goal of all of life for all things, living and not:]

'An Essay on Man: Epistle II'

...

Th' eternal art educing good from ill

...

" - Alexander Pope
(1688–1744), English poet. [Educe = verb - bring out or develop (something latent or potential)].
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[Quote No.52949] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the joys of every age and stage of life]

'An Essay on Man: Epistle II'

...

See some strange comfort ev'ry state attend,
And pride bestow'd on all, a common friend;
See some fit passion ev'ry age supply,
Hope travels through, nor quits us when we die.

Behold the child, by nature's kindly law,
Pleas'd with a rattle, tickl'd with a straw:
Some livelier plaything gives his youth delight,
A little louder, but as empty quite:
Scarfs, garters, gold, amuse his riper stage,
And beads and pray'r books are the toys of age:
Pleas'd with this bauble still, as that before;
'Till tir'd he sleeps, and life's poor play is o'er!

...

" - Alexander Pope
(1688–1744), English poet
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[Quote No.52956] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:]

'Sunshine and Music'

A laugh is just like sunshine.
It freshens all the day,
It tips the peak of life with light,
And drives the clouds away.
The soul grows glad that hears it
And feels its courage strong.
A laugh is just like sunshine
For cheering folks along.

A laugh is just like music.
It lingers in the heart,
And where its melody is heard
The ills of life depart;
And happy thoughts come crowding
Its joyful notes to greet:
A laugh is just like music
For making living sweet.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53547] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about smiling and feeling happier]

'Try Smiling'

When the weather suits you not,
Try smiling.
When the coffee isn't hot,
Try smiling.
When your neighbors don't do right,
Or your relatives all fight, Sure 'tis hard, but then you might
Try smiling.

Doesn't change the things, of course --
Just smiling.
But it cannot make them worse --
Just smiling.
And it seems to help your case,
Brightens up a gloomy place,
Then, it sort o' rests your face --
Just smiling.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53029] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about people's differing ideals, values, goals, desires, greatest happiness, etc]

'Ideals'

Some men deem
Gold their god, and some esteem
Honor is the chief content
That to man in life is lent;
And some others do contend,
Quite none like to a friend;
Others hold there is no wealth
Compared to a perfect health;
Some man's mind in quiet stands
When he is lord of many lands:
But I did sigh, and said all this
Was but a shade of perfect bliss;
And in my thoughts I did approve
Naught so sweet as is true love.

" - Robert Greene

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[Quote No.53034] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about being happy]

'The Philosopher'

I saw him sitting in his door,
Trembling as old men do;
His house was old; his barn was old,
And yet his eyes seemed new.

His eyes had seen three times my years
And kept a twinkle still,
Though they had looked at birth and death
And three graves on a hill.

'I will sit down with you,' I said,
'And you will make me wise;
Tell me how you have kept the joy
Still burning in your eyes.'

Then like an old-time orator
Impressively he rose;
'I make the most of all that comes,
The least of all that goes.'

The jingling rhythm of his words
Echoes as old songs do,
Yet this had kept his eyes alight
Till he was ninety-two.

" - Sara Teasdale
(1884 - 1933), American poet.
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[Quote No.53052] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about being patient and persistent in your search for love, whether of a partner, vocation-career or passionate avocation-hobby.]

'Hungering Hearts'

Some hearts go hungering thro' the world
And never find the love they seek.
Some lips with pride or scorn are curled
To hide the pain they may not speak.
The eyes may flash, the mouth may smile -
And yet beneath them all the while
The hungering heart is pining still.

For them does life's dull desert hold
No fountain's shade, no gardens fair,
Nor gush of waters clear and cold,
But sandy reaches wide and bare.
The foot may fail, the soul may faint,
And weigh to earth the weary frame,
Yet still they make no weak complaint
And speak no word of grief or blame.

O eager eyes, which gaze afar,
O arms which clasp the empty air,
Not all unmarked your sorrows are,
Not all unpitied your despair.
Smile, patient lips, so proudly dumb -
Have Faith! Before life's tent is furled
Your recompense shall come,
O hearts that hunger through the world!

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53061] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the value of 'negative-bad' as well as 'positive-good' experiences for there are advantages in adversities, blessings in burdens, lessons in laments, positives in problems, etc!! For example; we learn patience; we learn to be grateful for the good things without taking them for granted and; we also learn to relate and be compassionate to those who are suffering!!]

'The Joy of Incompleteness'

If all our life were one broad glare
Of sunlight clear, unclouded:
If all our path were smooth and fair,
By no soft gloom enshrouded;
If all life's flowers were fully blown
Without the sweet unfolding,
And happiness were rudely thrown
On hands too weak for holding --
Should we not miss the twilight hours,
The gentle haze and sadness?
Should we not long for storms and showers
To break the constant gladness?

If none were sick and none were sad,
What service could we render?
I think if we were always glad
We scarcely could be tender.
Did our beloved never need
Our patient ministration,
Earth would grow cold and miss indeed
Its sweetest consolation:
If sorrow never claimed our heart
And every wish were granted
Patience would die, and hope depart --
Life would be disenchanted.

" - Albert Crowell

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[Quote No.53086] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the value and benefit of getting busy and using activity to distract the attention from boredom or other negatives and feel a little satisfaction when achieve some goals!]

'Work'

How true it is when I am sad,
A little work can make me glad.
When frowning care comes to my door,
I work a while and fret no more.
I leave my couch harassed with pain,
I work, and soon I'm well again.
When sorrow comes and vain regret,
I go to work and soon forget.
Work soothes the soul when joys depart,
And often mends a broken heart.

...

" - J. W. Thompson

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[Quote No.53104] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the value and benefit of being busy and using activity to distract the attention from boredom, heartache or other negatives and feel a little satisfaction when achieve some goals.]

'Find Work'

...

My mother’s mother, widowed very young
of her first love, and of that love’s first fruit,
moved through her father’s farm, her country tongue
and country heart anaesthetized and mute
with labor. So her kind was taught to do -
'Find work,' she would reply to every grief -
and her one dictum, whether false or true,
tolled heavy with her passionate belief.
Widowed again, with children, in her prime,
she spoke so little it was hard to bear
so much composure, such a truce with time
spent in the lifelong practice of despair.
But I recall her floors, scrubbed white as bone,
her dishes, and how painfully they shone.

" - Rhina P. Espaillat
(1932 - ) She was born in the Dominican Republic under the dictatorship of Rafael Trujillo. After Espaillat’s father opposed the regime, her family was exiled to the United States, where they settled in New York City. She began writing poetry as a young girl, first in Spanish, then English, and has published in both languages.
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[Quote No.53107] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the joys of being alive]

'A Pretty Good World'

Pretty good world if you take it all round -
Pretty good world, good people!
Better be on than under the ground -
Pretty good world, good people!
Better be here where the skies are as blue
As the eyes of your sweetheart a-smilin' at you -
Better than lyin' 'neath daisies and dew -
Pretty good world, good people!

Pretty good world with its hopes and its fears -
Pretty good world, good people!
Sun twinkles bright through the rain of its tears -
Pretty good world, good people!
Better be here, in the pathway you know -
Where the thorn's in the garden where sweet roses grow,
Than to rest where you feel not the fall o' the snow -
Pretty good world, good people!

Pretty good world! Let us sing it that way -
Pretty good world, good people!
Make up your mind that you're in it to stay -
At least for a season, good people!
Pretty good world, with its dark and its bright -
Pretty good world, with its love and its light;
Sing it that way till you whisper, 'Good-night!' -
Pretty good world, good people!

" - Frank Lebby Stanton
(1857 – 1927), frequently credited as Frank L. Stanton, Frank Stanton or F. L. Stanton, was an American lyricist. He was also the initial columnist for the Atlanta Constitution and became the first poet laureate of the State of Georgia, a post to which he was appointed by Governor Clifford Walker in 1925 and which Stanton held until his death.
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[Quote No.53108] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about life being a 'mixed blessing' but that the good is really great]

'This World'

This world that we're a-livin' in
Is mighty hard to beat;
You git a thorn with every rose,
But ain't the roses sweet!

" - Frank Lebby Stanton
(1857 – 1927), frequently credited as Frank L. Stanton, Frank Stanton or F. L. Stanton, was an American lyricist. He was also the initial columnist for the Atlanta Constitution and became the first poet laureate of the State of Georgia, a post to which he was appointed by Governor Clifford Walker in 1925 and which Stanton held until his death.
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[Quote No.53132] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about not dwelling longer than necessary to learn and deal with negatives in the past, present or future; and when taking time to have fun, relax and recreate focusing your attention - being mindful - on enjoying the present moment]

'It's Fine Today'

Sure, this world is full of trouble
I ain't said it ain't.
Lord, I've had enough and double
Reason for complaint;
Rain and storm have come to fret me,
Skies are often gray;
Thorns and brambles have beset me
On the road — but say,
Ain't it fine today?

What's the use of always weepin',
Making trouble last?
What's the use of always keepin'
Thinkin' of the past?

Each must have his tribulation — Water with his wine;
Life, it ain't no celebration,
Trouble? — I've had mine —
But today is fine!

It's today that I am livin',
Not a month ago.
Havin'; losin'; takin'; givin';
As time wills it so.
Yesterday a cloud of sorrow
Fell across the way,
It may rain again tomorrow,
It may rain — but say,
Ain't it fine today?

" - Douglas Malloch
(1877 – 1938) American poet, short-story writer and Associate Editor of American Lumberman, a trade paper in Chicago.
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[Quote No.53136] Need Area: Fun > General
"I've learned that even when I have pains, I don't have to be one. In fact it's better for all concerned if I'm not!!" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53152] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the importance of once you have learned what you can from a negative, including compassion for others with difficulties, it is important if you wish to be happy to put those negatives out of sight - to distract from them - and focus your mind on other things that don't produce any negative emotions.]

'Then Laugh'

Build for yourself a strong box,
fashion each part with care;
When it's strong as your hand can make it,
put all your troubles there;

Hide there all thought of your failures;
and each bitter cup that you guaff;
Lock all your heartaches within it,
Then sit on the lid and laugh.

Tell no one else its contents,
Never its secrets share;
When you've dropped in your care and worry
keep them forever there;

Hide them from sight so completely
That the world will never dream half;
Fasten the strongbox securely -
Then sit on the lid and laugh.

" - Bertha Adams Backus
(1870 - 1956), American poet. This poem is her most famous work. It was first published on August 26, 1931, at the height of 'The Great Depression' in America in the magazine called, 'Grit'.
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[Quote No.53172] Need Area: Fun > General
"That pleasure which is at once the most pure, the most elevating and the most intense, is derived, I maintain, from the contemplation of the beautiful." - Edgar Allan Poe

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[Quote No.53180] Need Area: Fun > General
"...but why complain of thorns? [Isn't it] Enough to have the rose [?]" - Margaret E. Bruner

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[Quote No.53178] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the right attitude to approach life ...and death]

'Life Owes Me Nothing'

Life owes me nothing. Let the years
bring clouds or azure, joy or tears;
Already a full cup I’ve quaffed;
already wept and loved and laughed,
And seen, in ever-endless ways,
new beauties overwhelm the days.

Life owes me nought. No pain that waits
can steal the wealth from memory’s gates;
No aftermath of anguish slow
can quench the soul fire’s early glow.
I breathe, exulting, each new breath,
embracing Life, ignoring Death.

Life owes me nothing. One clear morn
is boon enough for being born;
And be it ninety years or ten,
no need for me to question when.
While Life is mine, I’ll find it good,
and greet each hour with gratitude.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53187] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about taking time to enjoy yourself - smell the roses - and don't lose yourself and life in endless work and worry]

'Take Time to Live'

Take time to live;
The world has much to give,
Of faith and hope and love:
Of faith that life is good,
That human brotherhood
Shall no illusion prove;
Of hope that future years
Shall bring the best, in spite
Of those whose darkened sight
Would stir our doubts and fears;
Of love, that makes of life,
With all its griefs, a song;
A friend, of conquered wrong;
A symphony, of strife.
Take time to live,
Nor to vain mammon give
Your fruitful years.

Take time to live;
The world has much to give
Of sweet content; of joy
At duty bravely done;
Of hope, that every sun
Shall bring more fair employ.
Take time to live,
For life has much to give
Despite the cynic's sneer
That all's forever wrong;
There's much that calls for song.
To fate lend not your ear.
Take time to live;
The world has much to give.

" - Thomas Curtis Clark
(1877-1954), author of over sixty hymns, studied at University of Chicago in Chicago, Illinois 1901-02 and served on the editorial staff of the 'Christian Century' in Chicago, Illinois 1912-48. [http://www.hymnary.org/person/Clark_TC ]
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[Quote No.53196] Need Area: Fun > General
"The happiness of your life depends upon the quality of your thoughts." - Marcus Aurelius

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