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  Quotations - General  
[Quote No.53198] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about taking good from any bad experiences and feelings by using them to learn how to fix and avoid that problem in the future and also relearn and regain the empathy, sympathy and compassion which links us imaginatively to others and their feelings - especially pain - so we wish to help them as we would want to help ourselves in their situation - in accordance with ethics, morality, reciprocity and love's 'Golden Rule' of treating others as we would want to be treated in the same situation.]

'Rebirth'

Sometimes we go our way carefree;
No trouble comes to mar
The routine of our lives, and we
Forget there is a scar
Or wound in other lives, till pain
Descends on someone near
To us, and then our hearts regain
Lost kindliness; we hear
With understanding of the woes
Of others — a rebirth
Comes, and we feel for all of those
Who suffer here on earth.

" - Margaret E. Bruner

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[Quote No.53203] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about creating a delay and a distraction between an annoyance and our angry reaction in order to regain desired focus, self-control, self-discipline and calm, thoughtful choice to find a peaceful, wise reaction. Perhaps think of ten of your favourite things you like from the need areas or two from each of the senses, etc!]

'Count Ten'

What shall we count to cool our angry pride?
Ten chilly digits standing in a line?
Oh, wiser far to count ten circling stars
That lean upon blue space: they will decline
To lend themselves to bitterness or pain.
Or we might count ten muted leaves that fall
Bearing a freight of somber autumn rain -
Ten leaves that fall, one here, one distantly,
In leisurely submission to the ground.
Or ten flecked pebbles lying in a pool
So hushed by dawn that the air holds no sound
Of water-motion. Or count ten mortal men
Who have come forth by the red gate of birth
To meet the wind . . . to learn the tang of laughter . . .
To wonder . . . and return into the earth.
For having counted, slowly we can lift
Our eyes to look on him who has offended,
Saying, 'How large and strange this life we live . . .
Was I enraged with you? . . . Well, that is ended . . .'

" - Bonaro W. Overstreet
(circa 1903 - 1985), Bonaro Wilkinson Overstreet, American author, poet and psychologist. For more than three decades, Mrs. Overstreet and her husband, Harry A. Overstreet, lectured widely on adult education, mental health, social psychology and political philosophy. Outspoken defenders of civil liberties and academic freedom, they co-wrote many books, including 'The Mind Alive,' and 'Leaders for Adult Education,'. Mrs. Overstreet, wrote several volumes of poetry, and wrote such inspirational books as 'Courage for Crisis' and 'How to Stay Alive All of Your Life.' [refer http://www.nytimes.com/1985/09/11/arts/bonaro-w-overstreet-author-is-dead-at-82.html ]
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[Quote No.53227] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the benefits of finding enjoyment - for example initiative, motivation and persistence - in what you have to do as well as what you do to relax.]

'Discovery'

I wished to shirk my task one day:
I much preferred some pleasant play.
But when the work I'd once begun,
'Twas full of interest, joy and fun.

The dust removed from off my books
Brought happy thoughts and cheerful looks.
Weeds, in the garden, put to rout,
Made beauty blossom round about.

Why use my time and strength and skill
In hard-wrought play, to serve me ill?
Why from sure pleasure should I shirk,
Since there is play in pleasant work?

" - Benjamin Keech

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[Quote No.53235] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the value of a sense of humor, trying not to take anything especially ourselves too seriously and trying to see the unexpected, surprising, silly and funny side of things and ourselves and letting yourself and others smile, joke and laugh easily and often]

'Sense Of Humour'

What it is, can't just say,
Only know it saved the day,
Drove the gathering clouds away.
Just a twinkle in the eye,
Just a smile instead of sigh;
Lo! the storm soon passed right by
— all through a sense of humour.

What it is, don't just know,
But it made rich laughter flow,
Life took on a rosy glow:
Troubles shrank to half their size;
Sorrow wore a cheerful guise;
Work appeared to be the prize
— all through a sense of humour.

Things were going very wrong,
Flowers no colour, birds no song;
Weakness ousted courage strong
— stepped in a sense of humour:
Put the balance right again,
Saved two people lots of pain,
Brought the sunshine after Rain
— and that's a sense of humour.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
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[Quote No.53252] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about changing what you are focusing on and looking for and therefore what you are sensitive to and so naturally notice within your environment and in what you experience each day. Then you can note each beautiful thing at the time and perhaps even include it each night in a diary after noted other things that day such as perhaps three things you are grateful for and three things you are satisfied with and three things you are looking forward to]

'Beauty Each Day'

I shall find beauty in this day,
Perhaps I'll see (Oh, rare delight!)
blue columbines, like butterflies in flight,
or daisies starring all the meadow white;
I cannot say.

I shall find beauty. This alone I know.
It may be framed within the dawn-lit skies,
or lurking in true friendship's tender eyes,
or set within some precious words and wise,
or in the sunset's glow.

I shall find beauty in such little things.
Perhaps I'll see, on some drab, dusty street,
ill-shod, but carefree, twinkling, rhythmic feet
responding to a barrel-organ's beat,
while laughter gaily rings.

I shall find beauty ere the set of sun.
It may not flow from flowers that brightly gleam,
nor from a rose-winged, fairy-nurtured dream,
nor from the moonbeams on a silver stream -
merely from Duty done.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
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[Quote No.53277] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about life, age, philosophical value and experience]

'Festus' (1839) (Scene v. A Country Town)

...

We live in deeds, not years; in thoughts, not breaths;
In feelings, not in figures on a dial.
We should count time by heart-throbs. He most lives
Who thinks most, feels the noblest, acts the best.

...

" - Philip James Bailey
(1816 – 1902) English poet. Quote from the lengthy poem 'Festus' (1839), which eventually was extended to over 40,000 lines.
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[Quote No.53294] Need Area: Fun > General
"...be glad of life because it gives you to chance to love and to work and to play and to look up at the stars..." - Henry Van Dyke
(1852 – 1933) American author, educator, and clergyman. From his 'Footpath to Peace' document
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[Quote No.53303] Need Area: Fun > General
"[The following insight about the values of negatives in our lives has huge ramifications in all need-areas of life, but especially - learning, persisting, evolving, gratitude, satisfaction, anticipation:-] A problem, believe it or not, is always great news at least in that it motivates you to face and solve that problem – in the same way that as expressed in the saying, ‘Need is the mother of invention (as in creativity in scientific and cultural evolution)’. In facing that problem you develop empathy and compassion for other sufferers of that problem and sufferers of problems in general. That improves your human understanding and that in turn improves your imaginative empathy with others and from that you improve your ability to apply love’s ‘Golden Rule’ of treating others in the way you imagine you would want to be treated in that same situation. Also in facing and trying to solve that problem you will need to examine it carefully and try many possible solutions. Whether they work or not you will learn and grow in experience and wisdom. That then becomes another huge benefit of the problem." - Ben O'Grady
Founder and CEO of imagi-natives.com
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[Quote No.53342] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about being happy overall but missing it because distracted because focusing on the minor irritations rather than the many overarching joys]

'The Happiest Day'

...

I didn't even guess that I was happy.
The small irritations that are like salt
on melon were what I dwelt on,
though in truth they simply
made the fruit taste sweeter.

...

" - Linda Pastan
(1932 - ) American poet of Jewish background. From 1991–1995 she was Poet Laureate of Maryland. She is known for short poems about family life, domesticity, motherhood, the female experience, aging, death, loss and the fear of loss, as well as the fragility of life and relationships.
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[Quote No.53349] Need Area: Fun > General
"A cloudy day is no match for a sunny disposition." - William Arthur Ward

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[Quote No.53353] Need Area: Fun > General
"That some good can be derived from every event is a better proposition than that everything happens for the best, which it assuredly does not." - James K. Feibleman

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[Quote No.53359] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the value of staying in control of your imagination and therefore your thoughts and emotions so you don't get angry and upset and then act and speak irrationally or impetuously and make yourself and others even unhappier]

'Keep Your Temper'

It never did, and never will,
Put things in better fashion,
Though rough the road, and steep the bill,
To fly into a passion.

And never yet did fume or fret
Mend any broken bubble;
The direst evil, bravely met,
Is but a conquered trouble.

Our trials -- did we only know --
Are often what we make them;
And molehills into mountains grow,
Just by the way we take them.

Who keeps his temper, calm and cool,
Will find his wits in season;
But rage is weak, a foaming fool,
With neither strength nor reason.

And if a thing be hard to bear
When nerve and brain are steady,
If fiery passions rave and tear,
It finds us maimed already.

Who yields to anger conquered lies --
A captive none can pity;
Who rules his spirit, greater is
Than he who takes a city.

A hero he, though drums are mute,
And no gay banners flaunted;
He treads his passions under foot,
And meets the world undaunted.

Oh, then, to bravely do our best,
Howe'er the winds are blowing;
And meekly leave to God tine rest,
Is wisdom worth the knowing!

" - Ellen P. Allerton
(1835 – 1893), American poet whose inspiration probably came from her life on farms in rural New York, Wisconsin, and Kansas.
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[Quote No.53367] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about putting joy into each and every day so they are a pleasure to anticipate, experience and recall]

'Fabric'

I try to live each day
In such a way
That when tomorrow makes today a yesterday
I will have woven into the fabric of my life
Some gay design,
Some patch of color,
Bright, to please the eye.
So that, in the graying years to come,
When all the quick responsive senses dull,
I may look back across the patterns of my past
And, in my memory,
Live the joys and pains
Of all my yesterdays.

" - Don Blanding
(1894-1957), Hawaiian Poet Laureate, artist, designer, songwriter, theatrical actor, director and producer of musicals, soldier, lecturer, radio, film and television personality and newspaper columnist.
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[Quote No.53375] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about life and death using the metaphor of a loom-woven design for our experiences]

'The Weaver'

Ceaselessly the weaver, Time,
Sitting at his mystic loom,
Keeps his arrowy shuttle flying;
Every thread anears our dying --
And, with melancholy chime,
Very low and sad withal,
Sings his solemn madrigal
As he weaves our web of doom.

'Mortals!' thus he, weaving, sings,
'Bright or dark the web shall be,
As ye will it; all the tissues
Blending in harmonious issues,
Or discordant colorings;
Time the shuttle drives; but you
Give to every thread its hue,
And elect your destiny.

'God bestowed the shining warp,
Fill it with as bright a woof;
And the whole shall glow divinely,
As if wrought by angels finely,
To the music of the harp,
And the blended colors be
Like perfected harmony,
Keeping evil things aloof.

'Envy, malice, pride, and hate --
Foulest progeny of sin --
Let not these the weft entangle,
With their blind and furious wrangle,
Marring your diviner fate;
But with love and deeds of good
Be the web throughout endued,
And the perfect ye shall win.'

Thus he singeth very low,
Sitting at his mystic loom;
And his shuttle still is flying --
Thread by thread anears our dying,
Grows our shroud by every throw;
And the hues of woe or heaven
To each thread by us are given,
As he weaves our web of doom.

" - William Henry Burleigh
(1812-1871) [Madrigal = secular vocal composition without music, Anear = near, nearly ] [refer http://quod.lib.umich.edu/cgi/t/text/text-idx?c=moa&cc=moa&sid=95e3f6e828e116b80d4cccd93c806bc1&view=text&rgn=main&idno=ABF0163.0001.001 ]
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[Quote No.53379] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about how some see life as being difficult for most, rich and poor alike, until death's release!]

'Man Was Made To Mourn: A Dirge'

When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.

'Young stranger, whither wand'rest thou?'
Began the rev'rend sage;
'Does thirst of wealth thy step constrain,
Or youthful pleasure's rage?
Or haply, prest with cares and woes,
Too soon thou hast began
To wander forth, with me to mourn
The miseries of man.

'The sun that overhangs yon moors,
Out-spreading far and wide,
Where hundreds labour to support
A haughty lordling's pride;-
I've seen yon weary winter-sun
Twice forty times return;
And ev'ry time has added proofs,
That man was made to mourn.
'O man! while in thy early years,
How prodigal of time!
Mis-spending all thy precious hours -
Thy glorious, youthful prime!
Alternate follies take the sway;
Licentious passions burn;
Which tenfold force gives Nature's law.
That man was made to mourn.

'Look not alone on youthful prime,
Or manhood's active might;
Man then is useful to his kind,
Supported in his right:
But see him on the edge of life,
With cares and sorrows worn;
Then Age and Want-oh! ill-match'd pair -
Shew man was made to mourn.

'A few seem favourites of fate,
In pleasure's lap carest;
Yet, think not all the rich and great
Are likewise truly blest:
But oh! what crowds in ev'ry land,
All wretched and forlorn,
Thro' weary life this lesson learn,
That man was made to mourn.

'Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves,
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight,
So abject, mean, and vile,
Who begs a brother of the earth
To give him leave to toil;
And see his lordly fellow-worm
The poor petition spurn,
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife
And helpless offspring mourn.

'If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave,
By Nature's law design'd,
Why was an independent wish
E'er planted in my mind?
If not, why am I subject to
His cruelty, or scorn?
Or why has man the will and pow'r
To make his fellow mourn?

'Yet, let not this too much, my son,
Disturb thy youthful breast:
This partial view of human-kind
Is surely not the last!
The poor, oppressed, honest man
Had never, sure, been born,
Had there not been some recompense
To comfort those that mourn!

'O Death! the poor man's dearest friend,
The kindest and the best!
Welcome the hour my aged limbs
Are laid with thee at rest!
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow
From pomp and pleasure torn;
But, oh! a blest relief for those
That weary-laden mourn!'

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as The Bard. He was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. This poem was first published in 1784.
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[Quote No.53389] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem:- about the joys of imagination - memory and fantasy]

'My Mind to me a Kingdom is'

My mind to me a kingdom is;
Such perfect joy therein I find
That it excels all other bliss
That world affords or grows by kind.
Though much I want which most men have,
Yet still my mind forbids to crave.

No princely pomp, no wealthy store,
No force to win the victory,
No wily wit to salve a sore,
No shape to feed each gazing eye;
To none of these I yield as thrall.
For why my mind doth serve for all.

I see how plenty suffers oft,
How hasty climbers soon do fall;
I see that those that are aloft
Mishap doth threaten most of all;
They get with toil, they keep with fear.
Such cares my mind could never bear.

Content I live, this is my stay;
I seek no more than may suffice;
I press to bear no haughty sway;
Look what I lack my mind supplies;
Lo, thus I triumph like a king,
Content with that my mind doth bring.

I little have, and seek no more.
They are but poor, though much they have,
And I am rich with little store.
They poor, I rich; they beg, I give;
They lack, I leave, they pine, I live.

I laugh not at another's loss;
I grudge not at another's gain:
No worldly waves my mind can toss;
My state at one doth still remain.
I fear no foe, nor fawning friend;
I loathe not life, nor dread my end.

Some weigh their pleasure by their lust,
Their wisdom by their rage of will,
Their treasure is their only trust;
And cloaked craft their store of skill.
But all the pleasure that I find
Is to maintain a quiet mind.

My wealth is health and perfect ease;
My conscience clear my chief defense;
I neither seek by bribes to please,
Nor by deceit to breed offense.
Thus do I live; thus will I die.
Would all did so as well as I!

" - Edward de Vere
(1550 – 1604), Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, was an English peer and courtier of the Elizabethan era. Oxford was heir to the second oldest earldom in the kingdom, a court favourite for a time, a sought-after patron of the arts, and noted by his contemporaries as a lyric poet and playwright, but his reckless and volatile temperament precluded him from attaining any courtly or governmental responsibility and contributed to the dissipation of his estate. Since the 1920s he has been the most popular alternative candidate proposed for the authorship of Shakespeare's works. This poem (created before 1581) has been attributed to de Vere by Steven May, but has also been published as the work of Edward Dyer. [Refer http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/My_Mind_to_me_a_Kingdom_is ]
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[Quote No.53395] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the blessings of being cheerful]

'Ode VI: Hymn To Cheerfulness'

How thick the shades of evening close!
How pale the sky with weight of snows!
Haste, light the tapers, urge the fire,
And bid the joyless day retire.
- Alas, in vain i try within
To brighten the dejected scene,
While rouz'd by grief these fiery pains
Tear the frail texture of my veins;
While winter's voice, that storms around,
And yon deep death-bell's groaning sound
Renew my mind's oppressive gloom,
Till starting horror shakes the room.

Is there in nature no kind power
To sooth affliction's lonely hour?
To blunt the edge of dire disease,
And teach these wintry shades to please?
Come, Cheerfulness, triumphant fair,
Shine through the hovering cloud of care:
O sweet of language, mild of mien,
O virtue's friend and pleasure's queen,
Asswage the flames that burn my breast,
Compose my jarring thoughts to rest;
And while thy gracious gifts i feel,
My song shall all thy praise reveal.

As once ('twas in Astræa's reign)
The vernal powers renew'd their train,
It happen'd that immortal Love
Was ranging through the spheres above,
And downward hither cast his eye
The year's returning pomp to spy.
He saw the radiant god of day,
Waft in his car the rosy May;
The fragrant Airs and genial Hours
Were shedding round him dews and flowers;
Before his wheels Aurora pass'd,
And Hesper's golden lamp was last.
But, fairest of the blooming throng,
When Health majestic mov'd along,
Delighted to survey below
The joys which from her presence flow,
While earth enliven'd hears her voice,
And swains, and flocks, and fields rejoice;
Then mighty Love her charms confess'd,
And soon his vows inclin'd her breast,
And, known from that auspicious morn,
The pleasing Cheerfulness was born.

Thou, Cheerfulness, by heaven design'd
To sway the movements of the mind,
Whatever fretful passion springs,
Whatever wayward fortune brings
To disarrange the power within,
And strain the musical machine;
Thou, Goddess, thy attempering hand
Doth each discordant string command,
Refines the soft, and swells the strong;
And, joining nature's general song,
Through many a varying tone unfolds
The harmony of human souls.

Fair guardian of domestic life,
Kind banisher of homebred strife,
Nor sullen lip, nor taunting eye
Deforms the scene where thou art by:
No sickening husband damns the hour
Which bound his joys to female power;
No pining mother weeps the cares
Which parents waste on thankless heirs:
The officious daughters pleas'd attend;
The brother adds the name of friend:
By thee with flowers their board is crown'd,
With songs from thee their walks resound;
And morn with welcome lustre shines,
And evening unperceiv'd declines.

Is there a youth, whose anxious heart
Labors with love's unpitied smart?
Though now he stray by rills and bowers,
And weeping waste the lonely hours,
Or if the nymph her audience deign,
Debase the story of his pain
With slavish looks, discolor'd eyes,
And accents faltering into sighs;
Yet thou, auspicious power, with ease
Can'st yield him happier arts to please,
Inform his mien with manlier charms,
Instruct his tongue with nobler arms,
With more commanding passion move,
And teach the dignity of love.

Friend to the Muse and all her train,
For thee i court the Muse again:
The Muse for thee may well exert
Her pomp, her charms, her fondest art,
Who owes to thee that pleasing sway
Which earth and peopled heaven obey.

Let melancholy's plaintive tongue
Repeat what later bards have sung;
But thine was Homer's ancient might,
And thine victorious Pindar's flight:
Thy hand each Lesbian wreathe attir'd:
Thy lip Sicilian reeds inspir'd:
Thy spirit lent the glad perfume
Whence yet the flowers of Teos bloom;
Whence yet from Tibur's Sabine vale
Delicious blows the inlivening gale,
While Horace calls thy sportive choir,
Heroes and nymphs, around his lyre.

But see where yonder pensive sage
(A prey perhaps to fortune's rage,
Perhaps by tender griefs oppress'd,
Or glooms congenial to his breast)
Retires in desart scenes to dwell,
And bids the joyless world farewell.
Alone he treads the autumnal shade,
Alone beneath the mountain laid
He sees the nightly damps ascend,
And gathering storms aloft impend;
He hears the neighbouring surges roll,
And raging thunders shake the pole:
Then, struck by every object round,
And stunn'd by every horrid sound,
He asks a clue for nature's ways;
But evil haunts him through the maze:
He sees ten thousand demons rise
To wield the empire of the skies,
And chance and fate assume the rod,
And malice blot the throne of God.
- O thou, whose pleasing power i sing,
Thy lenient influence hither bring;
Compose the storm, dispell the gloom,
Till nature wear her wonted bloom,
Till fields and shades their sweets exhale,
And music swell each opening gale:
Then o'er his breast thy softness pour,
And let him learn the timely hour
To trace the world's benignant laws,
And judge of that presiding cause
Who founds on discord beauty's reign,
Converts to pleasure every pain,
Subdues each hostile form to rest,
And bids the universe be bless'd.

O thou, whose pleasing power i sing,
If right i touch the votive string,
If equal praise i yield thy name,
Still govern thou thy poet's flame;
Still with the Muse my bosom share,
And sooth to peace intruding care.

But most exert thy pleasing power
On friendship's consecrated hour;
And while my Sophron points the road
To godlike wisdom's calm abode,
Or warm in freedom's ancient cause
Traceth the source of Albion's laws,
Add thou o'er all the generous toil
The light of thy unclouded smile.
But, if by fortune's stubborn sway
From him and friendship torn away,
I court the Muse's healing spell
For griefs that still with absence dwell,
Do thou conduct my fancy's dreams
To such indulgent placid themes,
As just the struggling breast may cheer
And just suspend the starting tear,
Yet leave that sacred sense of woe
Which none but friends and lovers know.

" - Mark Akenside
(1721-1770), English poet and physician.
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[Quote No.53420] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the importance of laughter and humor]

'Laugh A Little Bit'

Here's a motto, just your fit --
Laugh a little bit.
When you think you're trouble hit,
Laugh a little bit.
Look misfortune in the face.
Brave the beldam's rude grimace;
Ten to one 'twill yield its place,
If you have the wit and grit
Just to laugh a little bit.

Keep your face with sunshine lit,
Laugh a little bit.
All the shadows off will flit,
If you have the grit and wit
Just to laugh a little bit.

Cherish this as sacred writ --
Laugh a little bit.
Keep it with you, sample it,
Laugh a little bit.
Little ills will sure betide you,
Fortune may not sit beside you,
Men may mock and fame deride you,
But you'll mind them not a whit
If you laugh a little bit.

" - Edmund Vance Cooke
(1866 - 1932), poet.
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[Quote No.53469] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about the ups and downs of life]

'Mortality'

...

Yea! hope and despondency, pleasure and pain,
Are mingled together in sunshine and rain;
And the smile and the tear, the song and the dirge,
Still follow each other, like surge upon surge.

...

" - William Knox
(1789 - 1825) Scottish poet. The author, a descendant of reformer John Knox, published the poem in a collection called 'The Songs of Israel' in 1824, shortly before his death at age 36. This poem was Abraham Lincoln's favorite poem and he often recited it from memory. In the 1830s, Dr. Jason Duncan introduced Lincoln to it - the poem 'Mortality' (sometimes called 'Immortality' or 'Oh, Why Should the Spirit of Mortal be Proud?'). At the time, the increasingly melancholy Lincoln lived in New Salem, Illinois, and had already lost several friends and relatives to death. Gradually Lincoln memorized the piece, but did not know the author's identity until late in life. He became so identified with the poem that some people thought he had written it. However, he only wished he had. He once remarked, 'I would give all I am worth, and go in debt, to be able to write so fine a piece as I think that is.' Lawrence Weldon, who traveled the law circuit with Lincoln, recalled Lincoln reciting the poem in 1860. He said, 'The weird and melancholy association of eloquence and poetry had a strong fascination for Mr. Lincoln's mind. Tasteful composition, either of prose or poetry, which faithfully contrasted the realities of eternity with the unstable and fickle fortunes of time, made a strong impression on his mind.' [Refer http://www.abrahamlincolnonline.org/lincoln/education/knox.htm ]
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[Quote No.53478] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about how positives - beauty, joy and life, etc exist even amongst negatives - ugliness, pain and death, etc for those who look]

'In Spite of War'

In spite of war, in spite of death,
In spite of all man's sufferings,
Something within me laughs and sings
And I must praise with all my breath.
In spite of war, in spite of hate
Lilacs are blooming at my gate,
Tulips are tripping down the path
In spite of war, in spite of wrath.
'Courage!' the morning-glory saith;
'Rejoice!' the daisy murmureth,
And just to live is so divine
When pansies lift their eyes to mine.

The clouds are romping with the sea,
And flashing waves call back to me
That naught is real but what is fair,
That everywhere and everywhere
A glory liveth through despair.
Though guns may roar and cannon boom,
Roses are born and gardens bloom;
My spirit still may light its flame
At that same torch whence poppies came.
Where morning's altar whitely burns
Lilies may lift their silver urns
In spite of war, in spite of shame.

And in my ear a whispering breath, 'Wake from the nightmare! Look and see That life is naught but ecstasy In spite of war, in spite of death!'" - Angela Morgan
(1875 - 1957), American author, poet and journalist.
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[Quote No.53494] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about remembering the satisfaction of past beauty and joy to encourage the hope of future beauty and joy.]

'Beauty As A Shield'

I will hold beauty as a shield against despair.
When my heart faints I will remember sights like these:
Bronze cypresses that framed a sapphire sea,
A desert mesa wrapped in sunset flame,
An airplane that raced the Overland
Above a trail still marked with whitening bones;
A path through a dim forest, hushed and sweet,
Lit by one amber beam that fell aslant;
Foam, silver-laced, along a curving wave;
Sprawled golden hills, with shadows like spilled wine;
Tall office buildings rearing through the night
Sheer walls of alabaster pierced with gold --
And snowflakes falling on a lonely pine.

I will hold beauty as a shield against despair.
When my heart faints I will remember sights like these:
The dawning wonder in a baby's face,
The kindness in a weary wanton's smile,
The gallant challenge of a cripple's grin,
Seeing forever bodies that are straight;
The fighting courage in a mother's eyes
When she waits, braced, to meet birth's gripping pains;
The shy adoring of a boy's first love,
The eager beauty of his first crusade
Against some wrong which he alone can right --
The tolerance that sometimes comes with age.

When my heart faints I will remember sights like these,
Holding their beauty as a shield against despair:
For if I can see glory such as this
With my dim eyes, my undeveloped brain,
And if from other darkened, selfish lives
Such flashes of brave loveliness can come,
Then surely there is something more than this
Sad maze of pain, bewilderment and fear --
And if there's something, I can still hope on.

" - Elsie Robinson

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[Quote No.53516] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about focusing on the positive things here-and-now and ignoring, or distracting ourselves from, the negative things because life is too short and opportunities for enjoyment and good are gone too quickly]

'If We Knew; Or, Blessings Of Today'

IF we knew the woe and heart-ache
That await us on the road;
If our lips could taste the wormwood,
If our backs could feel the load;
Would we waste to-day in wishing
For a time that ne'er may be?
Would we wait in such impatience
For our ships to come from sea?
If we knew the baby fingers
Pressed against the window-pane
Would be cold and stiff to-morrow, --
Never trouble us again;
Would the bright eyes of our darling
Catch the frown upon our brow
Would the print of baby fingers
Vex Us then as they do now?
Ah! those little ice-cold fingers,
How they point our memories back
To the hasty words and actions
Strewn along the backward track!
How those little hands remind us,
As in snowy grace they lie,
Not to scatter thorns, but roses,
For the reaping by and by.
Strange, we never prize the music
Till the sweet-voiced birds have flown;
Strange, that we should slight the violets
Till the lovely flowers are gone;
Strange, that summer skies and sunshine
Never seem one half so fair
As when winter's snowy pinions
Shake the white down in the air.
Lips from which the seal of silence
None but God can roll away
Never blossomed in such beauty
As adorns the mouth to-day;
And sweet words that freight our memory
With their beautiful perfume
Come to us in sweeter accents
Through the portals of the tomb.
Let us gather up the sunbeams
Lying all around our path;
Let us keep the wheat and roses,
Casting out the thorns and chaff;
Let us find our sweetest comfort
In the blessings of to-day,
With a patient hand removing
All the briers from the way.

" - May Louise Riley Smith
(circa 1842 - 1927)
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[Quote No.53575] Need Area: Fun > General
"Rehearse Coping Strategies: Here is a powerful tool that will help you cope with even the most difficult situations:- Mentally picture yourself coming across difficult life tests - and then see yourself coping well with them. Repeat this over and over again in your mind... Today, think of a specific life test that you can apply this to." - Rabbi Zelig Pliskin
(see Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezer Dessler - Michtav MaiEliyahu, vol.4, pp252-3)
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[Quote No.53584] Need Area: Fun > General
"The Two Skills of Happiness: Happiness is a skill that can be learned. To acquire this skill, it is necessary to master two basic skills: --1) The ability to focus on happiness-producing thoughts, as opposed to those which cause unhappiness. --2) The ability to evaluate events and situations as positive instead of negative [- by for example comparing them to something that is worse and then you can't help but feel grateful that they are not worse]. (Or at least to lower the degree of negativity - i.e. rather than considering some discomfort as a tragedy, evaluating it as minor.)" - Rabbi Zelig Pliskin
From his book, 'Gateway to Happiness', p.48.
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[Quote No.53594] Need Area: Fun > General
"Life is too short to be lived badly. " - Marjane Satrapi

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[Quote No.53645] Need Area: Fun > General
"The man [or woman] who makes everything that leads to happiness depend upon himself [or herself], and not upon other men [or women], has adopted the very best plan for living happily." - Plato

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[Quote No.53673] Need Area: Fun > General
"When one door closes, another door opens; but we often look so long and so regretfully upon the closed door that we do not see the ones which open for us." - Alexander Graham Bell

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[Quote No.53685] Need Area: Fun > General
"One resolution I have made, and try always to keep, is this: To rise above little things." - John Burroughs
(1837 - 1921)
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[Quote No.53703] Need Area: Fun > General
"Find ecstasy in life; the mere sense of living is joy enough." - Emily Dickinson
(1830 - 1886)
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[Quote No.53710] Need Area: Fun > General
"How to gain, how to keep, how to recover happiness is in fact for most men at all times the secret motive of all they do, and of all they are willing to endure." - William James
(1842 - 1910)
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[Quote No.53712] Need Area: Fun > General
"Think big thoughts but relish small pleasures." - Jackson Brown

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[Quote No.53721] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Negativity and pessimism:] People in the Recovery Movement have long had an expression for the mental mistakes being made by people actively pursuing unhappiness: Stinkin' Thinkin'." - Dr. Mardy Grothe

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[Quote No.53727] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Reciprocity:-] The world is a looking-glass [mirror] and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion." - William Makepeace Thackeray
Born and raised in Calcutta (his father worked for the East India Company), he was sent back to England at age three to be raised by relatives. After attending Trinity College, Cambridge, he studied law for two years, but never practiced. He also studied art in Paris, but never pursued an artistic career. He worked as a journalist, book critic, and writer for a number of years, but never achieved much of a name for himself until the first installment of 'Vanity Fair' appeared in January of 1847. The 35-year-old writer became an overnight celebrity, with many critics even comparing him to Charles Dickens. While he wrote several dozen other works, he will forever be associated with 'Vanity Fair,' England's 'best-loved novel,' according to a 2003 BBC poll. The title of the novel comes from John Bunyan's 'The Pilgrim's Progress' (1678). In Bunyan's work, Vanity was a town along the Pilgrim's route. Originally built by Beelzebub, the town's never-ending fair catered to worldly desires and hedonistic pleasures. This is a quote from the narrator in the early pages of 'Vanity Fair'.
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[Quote No.53744] Need Area: Fun > General
"Life is the continuous adjustment of internal relations to external relations [and vice versa]." - Herbert Spencer

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[Quote No.53756] Need Area: Fun > General
"I seek and enjoy a rich 'inner' life." - Ben O'Grady
Founder and CEO of the website imagi-natives.com.
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[Quote No.53766] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Song Lyrics: 'Happiness' ]

When you go to measuring someone's success
Don't count money count happiness

" - Ken Dodd
Lyric from his song, 'Happiness'.
(The 'author' ascribed to this 'quote' is the artist that released this version of the song. It is not necessarily the only artist to release the song nor is it necessarily the only version of the song available. The artist is not necessarily the song's writer, as in the person or persons who wrote the lyrics and music. The above lyrics are obviously the property and copyright of their legal owners. They are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.)
[Refer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=utvU2h8Lr9w and http://www.lyricsmania.com/happiness_lyrics_ken_dodd.html ]

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[Quote No.53778] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable! --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.53783] Need Area: Fun > General
"No [woman or] man is a [complete] failure who is enjoying life." - William Feather
American publisher
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[Quote No.53891] Need Area: Fun > General
"All that we are is made up of our thoughts [what we focus on]; it is founded on our thoughts, it is made up of our thoughts. If a man speak or act with a pure thought, happiness will follow him, like a shadow that never leaves him!" - Buddha

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[Quote No.53904] Need Area: Fun > General
"The proper function of man is to live, not to exist." - Jack London

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[Quote No.53912] Need Area: Fun > General
"The thoughts we choose to think are the tools we use to paint the canvas of our lives!!" - Louise Hay

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[Quote No.53928] Need Area: Fun > General
"Life is the greatest art of all, and the master artist is the man [or woman] who is living the beautiful life." - J. Edgar Park

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[Quote No.54104] Need Area: Fun > General
"There is great joy in controlling your own solipsist 'life of the mind' subjective experience." - Unknown

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[Quote No.54171] Need Area: Fun > General
"We cannot [always] chose our external circumstances but we can always choose how we respond to them." - Epictetus
(55 - 135) Greek Philosopher
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[Quote No.54255] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story – with a message about positive thinking and remembering that every day we have the choice to live fully] Jerry is the kind of guy you love... He is always in a good mood and always has something positive to say. When someone would ask him how he was doing, he would reply, ‘If I were any better, I would be twins!’ He was a unique manager because he had several waiters who had followed him around from restaurant to restaurant. The reason the waiters followed Jerry was because of his attitude. He was a natural motivator. If an employee was having a bad day, Jerry was there telling the employee how to look on the positive side of the situation. Seeing this style really made me curious, so one day I went up to Jerry and asked him, I don't get it! You can't be a positive person all of the time. How do you do it?’ Jerry replied, ‘Each morning I wake up and say to myself, Jerry, you have two choices today. You can choose to be in a good mood or you can choose to be in a bad mood. I choose to be in a good mood. Each time something bad happens, I can choose to be a victim or I can choose to learn from it. I choose to learn from it. Every time someone comes to me complaining, I can choose to accept their complaining or I can point out the positive side of life. I choose the positive side of life.’ 'Yeah, right, it's not that easy,’ I protested. ‘Yes, it is,’ Jerry said. ‘Life is all about choices. When you cut away all the junk, every situation is a choice. You choose how you react to situations. You choose how people will affect your mood. You choose to be in a good mood or bad mood. The bottom line: It's your choice how you live life.’ I reflected on what Jerry said. Soon thereafter, I left the restaurant industry to start my own business. We lost touch, but I often thought about him when I made a choice about life instead of reacting to it. Several years later, I heard that Jerry did something you are never supposed to do in a restaurant business: he left the back door open one morning and was held up at gun point by three armed robbers. While trying to open the safe, his hand, shaking from nervousness, slipped off the combination. The robbers panicked and shot him. Luckily, Jerry was found relatively quickly and rushed to the local trauma center. After 18 hours of surgery and weeks of intensive care, Jerry was released from the hospital with fragments of the bullets still in his body. I saw Jerry about six months after the accident. When I asked him how he was, he replied, ‘If I were any better, I'd be twins. Wanna see my scars?’ I declined to see his wounds, but did ask him what had gone through his mind as the robbery took place. ‘The first thing that went through my mind was that I should have locked the back door,’ Jerry replied. ‘Then, as I lay on the floor, I remembered that I had two choices: I could choose to live or I could choose to die. I chose to live.’ ‘Weren't you scared? Did you lose consciousness?’ I asked. Jerry continued, ‘...the paramedics were great. They kept telling me I was going to be fine. But when they wheeled me into the ER and I saw the expressions on the faces of the doctors and nurses, I got really scared. In their eyes, I read 'he's a dead man.' I knew I needed to take action.' 'What did you do?' I asked. 'Well, there was a big burly nurse shouting questions at me,’ said Jerry. ‘She asked if I was allergic to anything. ’Yes,' I replied. The doctors and nurses stopped working as they waited for my reply. I took a deep breath and yelled, 'Bullets!' Over their laughter, I told them, 'I am choosing to live. Operate on me as if I am alive, not dead.' Jerry lived thanks to the skill of his doctors, but also because of his amazingly positive attitude to see the best in life." - Anonymous

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[Quote No.54266] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story - with a message about love and hate, kindness and anger, confidence and fear, etc:-] 'The Wolves Within' An old Grandfather, whose grandson came to him with anger at a schoolmate who had done him an injustice, said, 'Let me tell you a story. I too, at times, have felt a great hate for those that have taken so much, with no sorrow for what they do. But hate wears you down, and does not hurt your enemy. It is like taking poison and wishing your enemy would die. I have struggled with these feelings many times.' He continued, 'It is as if there are two wolves inside me; one is good and does no harm. He lives in harmony with all around him and does not take offence when no offence was intended. He will only fight when it is right to do so, and in the right way. But the other wolf, ah! He is full of anger. The littlest thing will set him into a fit of temper. He fights everyone, all the time, for no reason. He cannot think because his anger and hate are so great. It is hard to live with these two wolves inside me, for both of them try to dominate my spirit.' The boy looked intently into his Grandfather's eye and asked, 'Which one wins, Grandfather?' The Grandfather solemnly said, 'The one I feed.'" - Unknown

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[Quote No.54268] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story - with a message about peace:] 'The Real Meaning of Peace' There once was a king who offered a prize to the artist who would paint the best picture of peace. Many artists tried. The king looked at all the pictures. But there were only two he really liked, and he had to choose between them. One picture was of a calm lake. The lake was a perfect mirror for peaceful towering mountains all around it. Overhead was a blue sky with fluffy white clouds. All who saw this picture thought that it was perfect picture of peace. The other picture had mountains, too. But these were rugged and bare. Above was an angry sky, from which rain fell and in which lightning played. Down the side of the mountain tumbled a foaming waterfall. This did not look peaceful at all. But when the king looked closely, he saw behind the waterfall a tiny bush growing in a crack in the rock. In the bush a mother bird had built her nest. There, in the midst of the rush of angry water, sat the mother bird on her nest - imperfect peace. Which picture do you think won the prize? The king chose the second picture. Do you know why? ‘Because,’ explained the king, ‘peace does not mean to be in a place where there is no noise, trouble, or hard work. Peace means to be in the midst of all those things and still be calm in your heart. That is the real meaning of peace.’ " - Unknown

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[Quote No.54274] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story – with a message about how you let adversity affect you:] 'Are you a Carrot, an Egg or Coffee Bean?' A young woman went to her mother and told her about her life, and how things were so hard for her. She did not know how she was going to make it, and wanted to give up. She was tired of fighting and struggling. It seemed as one problem was solved a new one arose. Her mother took her to the kitchen. She filled three pots with water. In the first pot, she placed carrots, in the second she placed eggs and the last she placed ground coffee beans. She let them sit and boil without saying a word. In about twenty minutes she turned off the burners. She fished the carrots out and placed them in a bowl. She pulled the eggs out and placed them in a bowl. Then she ladled the coffee out and placed it in a bowl. Turning to her daughter, she asked, ‘Tell me what you see?’ ‘Carrots, eggs, and coffee,’ she replied. She brought her closer and asked her to feel the carrots. She did and noted that they got soft. She then asked her to take the egg and break it. After pulling off the shell, she observed the hard-boiled egg. Finally, she asked her to smell and sip the coffee. The daughter smiled, as she smelled and tasted its rich aroma. The daughter then asked, ‘What's the point, mother?’ Her mother explained that each of these objects had faced the same adversity - boiling water - but each reacted differently. The carrot went in strong, hard and unrelenting. However, after being subjected to the boiling water, it softened and became weak. The egg had been fragile. Its thin outer shell had protected its liquid interior. But, after sitting through the boiling water, its inside became hardened. The ground coffee beans were unique, however. After they were in the boiling water they had changed the water. ‘Which are you?’ she asked her daughter. ‘When trials and adversity knock on your door, how do you respond? Are you a carrot, an egg, or a coffee bean?’ ‘Think of this: Which am I? Am I the carrot that seems strong, but with pain and adversity, do I wilt and become soft and lose my strength? Am I the egg that starts with a passive heart, but changes with the heat? Did I have a fluid spirit, but after a death, a financial hardship or some other trial, have I become hardened and stiff? Does my shell look the same, but on the inside, am I bitter and tough with a stiff spirit and a hardened heart? Or, am I like the coffee bean? The bean actually changes the hot water, the very circumstance that brings the pain. When the water gets hot, it releases the fragrance and flavor. If you are like the bean, when things are at their worst, you become better and change the situation around you. When the hours are the darkest and trials are their greatest do you elevate to another level? How do you handle adversity? Like the CARROT, the EGG, OR the COFFEE BEAN?" - Unknown

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[Quote No.54279] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story - with a message about the importance of taking regular breaks and occasional vacations:] 'The Woodcutter!' Once upon a time a very strong woodcutter asked for a job with a timber merchant and got it. The pay was really good and so were the work conditions. For that reason, the woodcutter was determined to do his best. His boss gave him an axe and showed him the area where he was supposed to work. The first day, the woodcutter cut down 18 trees. 'Congratulations,' the boss said. 'Go on that way!' 'Very motivated by the boss's words, the woodcutter tried harder the next day, but he only could cut down 15 trees. The third day he tried even harder, but he only could cut down 10 trees. Day after day he was cutting down less and less trees. 'I must be losing my strength', the woodcutter thought. He went to the boss and apologized, saying that he could not understand what was going on. 'When was the last time you sharpened your axe?' the boss asked. 'Sharpen? I had no time to sharpen my axe. I have been very busy trying to cut trees ...As he was saying this he realized what the boss meant and saw the error and how he could get back to doing well." - Unknown

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[Quote No.54316] Need Area: Fun > General
"[A story - with a message about the importance of taking regular breaks and occasional vacations:] 'The Two Lumberjacks!' It was the annual lumberjack competition and the final was between an older, experienced lumberjack and a younger, stronger lumberjack. The rule of the competition was quite simply who could fell the most trees in a day was the winner. The younger lumberjack was full of enthusiasm and went off into the wood and set to work straight away. He worked all through the day and all through the night. As he worked, he could hear the older lumberjack working in another part of the forest and he felt more and more confident with every tree he felled that he would win. At regular intervals throughout the day, the noise of trees being felled coming from the other part of the forest would stop. The younger lumberjack took heart from this, knowing that this meant the older lumberjack was taking a rest, whereas he could use his superior youth and strength and stamina to keep going. At the end of the competition, the younger lumberjack felt confident he had won. He looked in front of him at the piles of felled trees that were the result of his superhuman effort. At the medal ceremony, he stood on the podium confident and expecting to be awarded the prize of champion lumberjack. Next to him stood the older lumberjack who looked surprisingly less exhausted than he felt. When the results were read out, he was devastated to hear that the older lumberjack had chopped down significantly more trees than he had. He turned to the older lumber jack and said: ‘How can this be? I heard you take a rest every hour and I worked continuously through the night. What's more, I am stronger and fitter than you old man’. The older lumberjack turned to him and said: ‘Every hour, I took a break to rest and sharpen my saw.’" - Unknown

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