Imagi-Natives advice on:
0 0
Daily Needs
Mind Needs
 Learn Quotes (5026)
 Imagine Quotes (1920)
Plan Quotes (1668)
 Focus Quotes (2127)
Persist Quotes (5308)
 Evolve Quotes (1504)
Progress Quotes (290)
 General Quotes (296)
Body Needs
 Health Quotes (567)
 Exercise Quotes (413)
 Grooming Quotes (148)
 General Quotes (823)
Money Needs
 Income Quotes (238)
 Tax Quotes (532)
 Save Quotes (186)
 Invest Quotes (4015)
 Spend Quotes (320)
 General Quotes (1228)
Work Needs
 Customers Quotes (137)
 Service Quotes (1032)
 Leadership Quotes (3231)
 Team Quotes (495)
 Make Quotes (283)
 Sell Quotes (1442)
 General Quotes (1040)
Property Needs
 Clothing Quotes (146)
 Home Quotes (151)
 Garden/Nature Quotes (965)
 Conservation Quotes (282)
 General Quotes (347)
Food Needs
 Food Quotes (205)
 Drink Quotes (226)
 General Quotes (533)
Friends Needs
 Friends Quotes (779)
 Partners Quotes (616)
 Children Quotes (1675)
 Love Quotes (792)
 Conversation Quotes (4582)
 General Quotes (8723)
Fun Needs
 Gratitude Quotes (1702)
 Satisfaction Quotes (965)
 Anticipation Quotes (1257)
 Experiences Quotes (631)
 Music Quotes (280)
 Books Quotes (1301)
 TV/movies Quotes (177)
 Art Quotes (655)
 General Quotes (2659)

 Imagi-Natives Search 
 
Quote/Topic  Author
Contains all words in any orderContains the exact phraseContains at least one word
[ 50 Item(s) displayed from page 53 ]


Previous<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  
27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  
52  53 54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  Next Page>>

  Quotations - Leadership  
[Quote No.52109] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about honesty and humility.] - Nothing but the Truth! - David Casstevens of the Dallas Morning News tells a story about Frank Szymanski, a Notre Dame center in the 1940s, who had been called as a witness in a civil suit at South Bend. 'Are you on the Notre Dame football team this year?' the judge asked. 'Yes, Your Honor.' 'What position?' 'Center, Your Honor.' 'How good a center?' Szymanski squirmed in his seat, but said firmly: 'Sir, I'm the best center Notre Dame has ever had.' Coach Frank Leahy, who was in the courtroom, was surprised. Szymanski always had been modest and unassuming. So when the proceedings were over, he took Szymanski aside and asked why he had made such a statement. Szymanski blushed. 'I hated to do it, Coach,' he said. 'But, after all, I was under oath.' " - David Casstevens
'Condensed Chicken Soup for the Soul'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52114] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about honesty, service and following the Golden Rule of treating others as you would like to be treated in the same circumstances:] - Why Lincoln Was Called 'Honest Abe' - In managing the country store, as in everything that he undertook for others, Lincoln did his very best. He was honest, civil, ready to do anything that should encourage customers to come to the place, full of pleasantries, patient, and alert. On one occasion, finding late at night, when he counted over his cash, that he had taken a few cents from a customer more than was due, he closed the store, and walked a long distance to make good the deficiency. At another time, discovering on the scales in the morning a weight with which he had weighed out a package of tea for a woman the night before, he saw that he had given her too little for her money. He weighed out what was due, and carried it to her, much to the surprise of the woman, who had not known that she was short in the amount of her purchase. Innumerable incidents of this sort are related of Lincoln, and we should not have space to tell of the alertness with which he sprang to protect defenseless women from insult, or feeble children from tyranny; for in the rude community in which he lived, the rights of the defenseless were not always respected as they should have been. There were bullies then, as now." - Noah Brooks
'Good Stories for Great Holidays'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52116] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about honesty, morality and playing fairly and within the rules including the most important rule, the Golden Rule of treating others as you would want to be treated in the same circumstances.] - Winners and Winners - As a high school coach, I did all I could to help my boys win their games. I rooted as hard for victory as they did. A dramatic incident, however, following a game in which I officiated as a referee, changed my perspective on victories and defeats. I was refereeing a league championship basketball game in New Rochelle, New York, between New Rochelle and Yonkers High. New Rochelle was coached by Dan O'Brien, Yonkers by Les Beck. The gym was crowded to capacity, and the volume of noise made it impossible to hear. The game was well played and closely contested. Yonkers was leading by one point as I glanced at the clock and discovered there were but 30 seconds left to play. Yonkers, in possession of the ball, passed off - shot - missed. New Rochelle recovered - pushed the ball up court - shot. The ball rolled tantalizingly around the rim and off. The fans shrieked. New Rochelle, the home team, recovered the ball, and tapped it in for what looked like victory. The tumult was deafening. I glanced at the clock and saw that the game was over. I hadn't heard the final buzzer because of the noise. I checked with the other official, but he could not help me. Still seeking help in this bedlam, I approached the timekeeper, a young man of 17 or so. He said, 'Mr. Covino, the buzzer went off as the ball rolled off the rim, before the final tap-in was made.' I was in the unenviable position of having to tell Coach O'Brien the sad news. 'Dan,' I said, 'time ran out before the final basket was tapped in. Yonkers won the game.' His face clouded over. The young timekeeper came up. He said, 'I'm sorry, Dad. The time ran out before the final basket.' Suddenly, like the sun coming out from behind a cloud, Coach O'Brien's face lit up. He said, 'That's okay, Joe. You did what you had to do. I'm proud of you.' Turning to me, he said, 'Al, I want you to meet my son, Joe.' The two of them then walked off the court together, the coach's arm around his son's shoulder. " - Al Covino
'A 4th Course of Chicken Soup for the Soul'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52120] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about how a leader can positively effect the morale of those they lead, especially when things are difficult.] - A Leader's Impact - In September of 1862, the [US] civil war tilted decisively in favor of the south [Confederacy]. The morale of the northern [Union] army dipped to its lowest point of the war. Large numbers of Union troops were in full retreat in Virginia. Northern leaders began to fear the worst. They saw no way to reverse the situation and turn the beaten, exhausted troops into a useful army again. There was only one general with the ability to work such a miracle. That was General George McClellan. He had trained the men for combat and they admired him. But neither the war department nor the rest of the cabinet members saw this connection. Only President Abraham Lincoln recognized Gen. McClellan's leadership skills. Fortunately, Lincoln ignored the protests of his advisors and reinstated McClellan back in command. He told the general to go down to Virginia and give those soldiers something no other man on earth could give them: enthusiasm, strength and hope. McClellan accepted the command. He mounted his great black horse and cantered down the dusty Virginia roads. What happened next is hard to describe. Northern leaders couldn't explain it. Union soldier couldn't explain it either. Even McClellan couldn't quite explain what happened. Gen. McClellan met the retreating Union columns, waved his cap in the air and shouted words of encouragement. When the worn out men saw their beloved teacher and leader, they began to take heart once again. They were moved with an unshakeable felling that now things could be different, that finally things could be all right again. Bruce Catton, the great civil war historian, describes this excitement that grew when word spread that McClellan was back in command. 'Down mile after mile of Virginia roads the stumbling column came alive. Men threw their caps and knapsacks into the air, and yelled until they could yell no more... because they saw this dapper little rider outlined against the purple starlight. 'And this, in a way, was the turning point of the war. ... No one could ever quite explain how it happened. But whatever it was, it gave President Lincoln and the north what was needed. And history was forever changed because of it.' The story of Gen. McClellan illustrates dramatically the impact a leader can have on the human spirit [i.e. morale not just on operational issues like vision, strategy and tactics.]" - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004).
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52121] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about leadership, honesty, apologising for mistakes and following the Golden Rule of treating others in the way you'd want to be treated in the same circumstances. This is also a real life example of a practical rule of successful leadership which states that you should always share the credit of the successes with all involved but accept alone the ultimate blame for all the failures.] - A True Leader - A few years ago, Pioneer Hi-Bred International, where I was employed, purchased Norand Corporation. Pioneer's sales representatives in the field used Norand hand-held terminals to upload daily sales information and download new price and sales incentive information. Pioneer bought so many of these hand-held terminals, the economics made the purchase of Norand look interesting. Owning Norand also allowed Pioneer to explore high-technology markets outside agriculture. But after a few years, the emerging laptop PC technology made the hand-held units obsolete. Pioneer sold Norand at a loss. Pioneer always took a given percent of the annual profits to divide equally among all employees, so our profit-sharing checks were lower than if Pioneer had not purchased Norand. Additionally, my Pioneer stock was lower than it had been before the purchase of Norand. I was not pleased. The CEO of Pioneer, Tom Urban, made annual formal visits to each of the Pioneer divisions to talk about the state of the business and to listen to employees' concerns. When he walked into the meeting room for his first visit after the sale of Norand, he acknowledged the group, removed his jacket and neatly folded it across the back of the chair. He loosened his tie, undid his collar and rolled up his sleeves. The next thing he said was the last thing I ever expected to hear a CEO say. He said, 'I made a mistake buying Norand and I am sorry. I am sorry your profit-sharing was lower because of the purchase, and I am sorry your stock was hurt by the purchase. I will continue to take risks, but I am a bit smarter now, and I will work harder for you.' The room was quiet for a moment before he asked for questions. A great man and leader stood before us that day. As I sat listening to him, I knew I could trust him, and that he deserved every bit of loyalty I could give to him and to Pioneer. I also knew I could take risks in my own job. In the brief moment of silence before the questions started, I recall thinking that I would follow him into any battle." - Martin L. Johnson
'Chicken Soup for the Soul at Work'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52122] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about helping others, especially through their difficult times.] - A Lesson to Teach - Her name was Mrs. Thompson. As she stood in front of her 5th grade class on the very first day of school, she told the children a lie. Like most teachers, she looked at her students and said that she loved them all the same. But that was impossible, because there in the front row, slumped in his seat, was a little boy named Teddy Stoddard. Mrs. Thompson had watched Teddy the year before and noticed that he didn't play well with the other children that his clothes were messy and that he constantly needed a bath. And Teddy could be unpleasant. It got to the point where Mrs. Thompson would actually take delight in marking his papers with a broad red pen, making bold X's and then putting a big 'F' at the top of his papers. At the school where Mrs. Thompson taught, she was required to review each child's past records and she put Teddy's off until last. However, when she reviewed his file, she was in for a surprise. Teddy's first grade teacher wrote, 'Teddy is a bright child with a ready laugh. He does his work neatly and has good manners...he is a joy to be around.' His second grade teacher wrote, 'Teddy is an excellent student, well liked by his classmates, but he is troubled because his mother has a terminal illness and life at home must be a struggle.' His third grade teacher wrote, 'His mother's death has been hard on him. He tries to do his best, but his father doesn't show much interest and his home life will soon affect him if some steps aren't taken.' Teddy's fourth grade teacher wrote, 'Teddy is withdrawn and doesn't show much interest in school. He doesn't have many friends and he sometimes sleeps in class.' By now, Mrs. Thompson realized the problem and she was ashamed of herself. She felt even worse when her students brought her Christmas presents, wrapped in beautiful ribbons and bright paper, except for Teddy's. His present was clumsily wrapped in the heavy, brown paper that he got from a grocery bag. Mrs. Thompson took pains to open it in the middle of the other presents. Some of the children started to laugh when she found a rhinestone bracelet with some of the stones missing, and a bottle that was one quarter full of perfume. But she stifled the children's laughter when she exclaimed how pretty the bracelet was, putting it on, and dabbing some of the perfume on her wrist. Teddy Stoddard stayed after school that day just long enough to say, 'Mrs. Thompson, today you smelled just like my Mom used to.' After the children left she cried for at least an hour. On that very day, she quit teaching reading, and writing, and arithmetic. Instead, she began to teach children. Mrs. Thompson paid particular attention to Teddy. As she worked with him, his mind seemed to come alive. The more she encouraged him, the faster he responded. By the end of the year, Teddy had become one of smartest children in the class and, despite her lie that she would love all the children the same, Teddy became one of her 'teacher's pets'. A year later, she found a note under her door, from Teddy, telling her that she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life. Six years went by before she got another note from Teddy. He then wrote that he had finished high school, third in his class, and she was still the best teacher he ever had in his whole life. Four years after that, she got another letter, saying that while things had been tough at times, he'd stayed in school, had stuck with it, and would soon graduate from college with the highest of honors. He assured Mrs. Thompson that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had in his whole life. Then four more years passed and yet another letter came. This time he explained that after he got his bachelor's degree, he decided to go a little further. The letter explained that she was still the best and favorite teacher he ever had. But now his name was a little longer -- the letter was signed, Theodore F. Stoddard, MD. The story doesn't end there. You see, there was yet another letter that spring. Teddy said he'd met this girl and was going to be married. He explained that his father had died a couple of years ago and he was wondering if Mrs. Thompson might agree to sit in the place at the wedding that was usually reserved for the mother of the groom. Of course, Mrs. Thompson did. And guess what? She wore that bracelet, the one with several rhinestones missing. And she made sure she was wearing the perfume that Teddy remembered his mother wearing on their last Christmas together. They hugged each other, and Dr. Stoddard whispered in Mrs. Thompson's ear, 'Thank you Mrs. Thompson for believing in me. Thank you so much for making me feel important and showing me that I could make a difference.' Mrs. Thompson, with tears in her eyes, whispered back. She said, 'Teddy, you have it all wrong. You were the one who taught me that I could make a difference. I didn't really know how to teach until I met you.' Please remember that wherever you go, and whatever you do, you will have the opportunity to touch and/or change a person's outlook. Please try to do it in a positive way: 'Friends are angels who lift us to our feet when our wings have trouble remembering how to fly.'" - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52128] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about helping others and following the Golden Rule of treating others as you'd like to be treated in the same circumstances.] - The Boy Under the Tree - In the summer recess between freshman and sophomore years in college, I was invited to be an instructor at a high school leadership camp hosted by a college in Michigan. I was already highly involved in most campus activities, and I jumped at the opportunity. About an hour into the first day of camp, amid the frenzy of icebreakers and forced interactions, I first noticed the boy under the tree. He was small and skinny, and his obvious discomfort and shyness made him appear frail and fragile. Only 50 feet away, 200 eager campers were bumping bodies, playing, joking and meeting each other, but the boy under the tree seemed to want to be anywhere other than where he was. The desperate loneliness he radiated almost stopped me from approaching him, but I remembered the instructions from the senior staff to stay alert for campers who might feel left out. As I walked toward him I said, ‘Hi, my name is Kevin and I'm one of the counselors. It's nice to meet you. How are you?’ In a shaky, sheepish voice he reluctantly answered, ‘Okay, I guess’ I calmly asked him if he wanted to join the activities and meet some new people. He quietly replied, ‘No, this is not really my thing.’ I could sense that he was in a new world, that this whole experience was foreign to him. But I somehow knew it wouldn't be right to push him, either. He didn't need a pep talk, he needed a friend. After several silent moments, my first interaction with the boy under the tree was over. At lunch the next day, I found myself leading camp songs at the top of my lungs for 200 of my new friends. The campers eagerly participated. My gaze wandered over the mass of noise and movement and was caught by the image of the boy from under the tree, sitting alone, staring out the window. I nearly forgot the words to the song I was supposed to be leading. At my first opportunity, I tried again, with the same questions as before: ‘How are you doing? Are you okay?’ To which he again replied, ‘Yeah, I'm alright. I just don't really get into this stuff.’ As I left the cafeteria, I realized this was going to take more time and effort than I had thought -- if it was even possible to get through to him at all. That evening at our nightly staff meeting, I made my concerns about him known. I explained to my fellow staff members my impression of him and asked them to pay special attention and spend time with him when they could. The days I spent at that camp flew by faster than any others I have known. Thus, before I knew it, mid-week had dissolved into the final night of camp and I was chaperoning the ‘last dance.’ The students were doing all they could to savor every last moment with their new ‘best friends’ -- friends they would probably never see again. As I watched the campers share their parting moments, I suddenly saw what would be one of the most vivid memories of my life. The boy from under the tree, who stared blankly out the kitchen window, was now a shirtless dancing wonder. He owned the dance floor as he and two girls proceeded to cut up a rug. I watched as he shared meaningful, intimate time with people at whom he couldn't even look just days earlier. I couldn't believe it was him. In October of my sophomore year, a late-night phone call pulled me away from my chemistry book. A soft-spoken, unfamiliar voice asked politely, ‘Is Kevin there?’ ‘You're talking to him. Who's this?’ ‘This is Tom Johnson's mom. Do you remember Tommy from leadership camp?' The boy under the tree. How could I not remember? ‘Yes, I do,’ I said. ‘He's a very nice young man. How is he?’ An abnormally long pause followed, then Mrs. Johnson said, ‘My Tommy was walking home from school this week when he was hit by a car and killed.’ Shocked, I offered my condolences. ‘I just wanted to call you,’ she said, ‘because Tommy mentioned you so many times. I wanted you to know that he went back to school this fall with confidence. He made new friends. His grades went up. And he even went out on a few dates. I just wanted to thank you for making a difference for Tom. The last few months were the best few months of his life.’ In that instant, I realized how easy it is to give a bit of yourself every day. You may never know how much each gesture may mean to someone else. I tell this story as often as I can, and when I do, I urge others to look out for their own ‘boy under the tree.’ " - David Coleman and Kevin Randall

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52134] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about doing more than necessary in order to grow and succeed:] - Learn and Earn - Jing and Chuan joined a wholesale company together just after graduation. Both worked very hard. After several years, the boss promoted Jing to sales executive but Chuan remained a sales rep. One day Chuan could not take it anymore, so he tendered his resignation and complained to the boss that he did not value the hardest working staff, but only promoted those who flattered him. The boss knew that Chuan had worked very hard for all the years, but in order to help Chuan realise the difference between him and Jing, the boss asked Chuan to do something for him. He asked him to go and find out if anyone was selling watermelon in the market? Chuan returned and said yes. The boss then asked how much were they selling it per kg? Chuan went back to the market to ask and returned to inform boss they were selling the watermelon for $12 per kg. The boss then told Chuan to watch what happens when I ask Jing the same original question? Jing went to the market, returned and said to the boss, 'Only one person was selling watermelon. He was selling it for $12 per kg or $100 for 10 kg. He has an inventory of 340 melons. On the table he had 58 melons, with each melon weighing about 15 kg. They were bought from the South two days ago so they are fresh and their quality and taste is good. Chuan was very impressed and realised the difference between himself and Jing and the difference between the service, quantity, quality and effort, required between a sales representative and a sales executive. He decided not to resign but to learn from Jing." - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52135] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about helping others be the best they can be and following the Golden Rule of treating others as you'd like to be treated in the same situation.] - Love: The One Creative Force - A college professor had his sociology class go into the Baltimore slums to get case histories of 200 young boys. They were asked to write an evaluation of each boy's future. In every case the students wrote, ‘He hasn't got a chance.’ Twenty-five years later another sociology professor came across the earlier study. He had his students follow up on the project to see what had happened to these boys. With the exception of 20 boys who had moved away or died, the students learned that 176 of the remaining 180 had achieved more than ordinary success as lawyers, doctors and businessmen. The professor was astounded and decided to pursue the matter further. Fortunately, all the men were in the area and he was able to ask each one, ‘How do you account for your success?’ In each case the reply came with feeling, ‘There was a teacher.’ The teacher was still alive, so he sought her out and asked the old but still alert lady what magic formula she had used to pull these boys out of the slums into successful achievement. The teacher's eyes sparkled and her lips broke into a gentle smile. ‘It's really very simple,’ she said. ‘I loved those boys.’ " - Eric Butterworth
'Chicken Soup for the Soul'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52142] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about learning to focus on the positives - that can praise and be grateful for - rather than on the negatives in life and other's behavior.] - A Clever Dog - A butcher watching over his shop is really surprised when he saw a dog coming inside the shop. He shoos him away. But later, the dog is back again. So, he goes over to the dog and notices he has a note in his mouth. He takes the note and it reads 'Can I have 12 sausages and a leg of lamb, please. The dog has money in his mouth, as well.' The butcher looks inside and, lo and behold, there is a ten dollar Note there. So he takes the money and puts the sausages and lamb in a bag, placing it in the dog's mouth. The butcher is so impressed, and since it's about closing time, he decides to shut up shop and follow the dog. So off he goes. The dog is walking down the street when he comes To a level crossing. The dog puts down the bag, jumps up and presses the button. Then he waits patiently, bag in mouth, for the lights to turn. They do, and he walks across the road, with the butcher following him all the way. The dog then comes to a bus stop, and starts looking at the timetable. The butcher is in awe at this stage. The dog checks out the times, and then sits on one of the seats provided. Along comes a bus. The dog walks around to the front, looks at the number, and goes back to his seat. Another bus comes. Again the dog goes and looks at the number, notices it's the right bus, and climbs on. The butcher, by now, open-mouthed, follows him onto the bus. The bus travels through the town and out into the suburbs, the dog Looking at the scenery. Eventually he gets up, and moves to the front of the bus. He stands on 2 back paws and pushes the button to stop the bus. Then he gets off, his groceries still in his mouth. Well, dog and butcher are walking along the road, and then the dog turns into a house. He walks up the path, and drops the groceries on the step. Then he walks back down the path, takes a big run, and throws himself against the door. He goes back down the path, runs up to the door and again, it throws himself against it. There's no answer at the house, so the dog goes back down the path, jumps up on a narrow wall, and walks along the perimeter of the garden. He gets to the window, and beats his head against it several times, walks back, jumps off, and waits at the door. The butcher watches as a big guy opens the door, and starts abusing the dog, kicking him and punching him, and swearing at him. The butcher runs up, and stops the guy. 'What in heaven's name are You doing? The dog is a genius. He could be on TV, for the life of me!' to which the guy responds: 'You call this clever? This is the second time this week that this stupid dog's forgotten his key.' " - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52154] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about how we see our lives and how this effects our behaviour and feelings.] - The Man of La Mancha - 'The Man of La Mancha', a musical made in 1972, is based on the story 'Don Quixote' by Miguel de Cervantes. It's an entertaining story, but it's also profound. Don Quixote sees the world as a quest, as an adventure, and he sees a poor kitchen maid as a lady of unsurpassed beauty and chastity. He dreams the impossible dream, he fights the unbeatable foe, he looks at life as a challenge to do good in the face of evil and make the world a better place. He wants to dedicate his victories to the kitchen maid, his Lady. She is bitter about life, full of anger. ‘Why do you do these things?’ she asks him. ‘What things?’ She bursts out in frustration, ‘It's ridiculous, the things you do!’ He answers simply, ‘I come into a world of iron to make a world of gold.’ ‘The world's a dung heap,’ she says, ‘and we are maggots that crawl on it.’ Two different stories, same objective reality. Yet one lives in a life of nobility and beauty and adventure, and the other lives in filth and misery and hatred. What kind of story do you live? Is it heroic? Or is it weak? Do you have a sense of destiny? Or do you have a sense of emptiness? What do you think is your destiny? The destiny of Earth? The destiny of the human race? The story you tell yourself -- the myth within which you live your life -- strongly affects your feelings and the ultimate outcome of your life. And it can change. You can change it deliberately!!" - Adam Khan
'Self-Help Stuff That Works'
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52189] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about the importance of leading through the Golden Rule where you treat others as you would want to be treated in the same circumstances!] - The Beggar King - Once there was a time, according to legend, when Ireland was ruled by a king who had no son. The king sent out his courtiers to post notices in all the towns of his realm. The notices advised that every qualified young man should apply for an interview with the king as a possible successor to the throne. However, all such candidates must have one qualification: They must love their fellow human beings. The young man about whom this legend centers saw a notice and reflected that he loved his neighbors. But two things stopped him; he was so poor that he had no clothes that would be presentable in the sight of the king; nor did he have the funds to buy provisions for the long journey to the castle. So the young man begged here, and borrowed there, finally managing to scrounge enough money for the appropriate clothes and the necessary supplies. Properly attired and well-suited, the young man set out on his quest, and had almost completed the journey when he came upon a poor beggar by the side of the road. The beggar sat trembling, clad only in tattered rags. His extended arms pleaded for help. His weak voice croaked, ‘I'm hungry and cold. Please help me... please?’ The young man was so moved by this beggar's need that he immediately stripped off his new clothes and put on the tattered threads of the beggar. Without a second thought he gave the beggar all his provision as well. Then, somewhat hesitantly, he continued his journey to the castle dressed in the rags of the beggar, lacking provisions for his return trek home. Upon his arrival at the castle, a king's attendant showed him in to the great hall. After a brief respite to clean off the journey's grime, he was finally admitted to the throne room of the king. The young man bowed low before his majesty. When he raised his eyes, he gaped in astonishment. ‘You... it's you! You're the beggar by the side of the road.’ ‘Yes,’ the king replied with a twinkle, ‘I was that beggar.’ ‘But...bu...bu... you are not really a beggar. You are the king for real. Well, then, why did you do this to me?’ the young man stammered after gaining more of his composure. ‘Because I had to find out if you genuinely love your fellow human beings,’ said the king. ‘I knew that if I came to you as king, you would have been impressed by my gem-encrusted golden crown and my royal robes. You would have done anything I asked of you because of my regal character. But that way I would never have known what is truly in your heart. So I used a ruse. I came to you as a beggar with no claims on you except for the love in your heart. And I discovered that you sincerely do love your fellow human beings. You will be my successor,’ promised the king. ‘You will inherit my kingdom.’" - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52209] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about vision, persistence and patience.] - The Acorn Planter - In the 1930s a young traveler was exploring the French Alps. He came upon a vast stretch of barren land. It was desolate. It was forbidding. It was ugly. It was the kind of place you hurry away from. Then, suddenly, the young traveler stopped dead in his tracks. In the middle of this vast wasteland was a bent-over old man. On his back was a sack of acorns. In his hand was a four-foot length of iron pipe. The man was using the iron pope to punch holes in the ground. Then from the sack he would take an acorn and put it in the hole. Later the old man the traveler, 'I've planted over 100,000 acorns. Perhaps only a tenth of them will grow.' The old man's wife and son had died, and this was how he chose to spend his final years. 'I want to do something useful,' he said. Twenty-five years later the now-not-as-young traveler returned to the same desolate area. What he saw amazed him. He could not believe his own eyes. The land was covered with a beautiful forest two miles wide and five miles long. Birds were singing, animals were playing, and wild flowers perfumed the air. The traveler stood there recalling the desolation that once was. A beautiful oak forest stood there now - all because someone cared! " - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004)
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52211] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about good leadership and the importance of the Golden Rule of treating others as you'd like to be treated in the same situation.] - Jessie's Glove - I do a lot of management training each year for the Circle K Corporation, a national chain of convenience stores. Among the topics we address in our seminars is the retention of quality employees - a real challenge to managers when you consider the pay scale in the service industry. During these discussions, I ask the participants, 'What has caused you to stay long enough to become a manager?' Some time back a new manager took the question and slowly, with her voice almost breaking, said, 'It was a $19 baseball glove.' Cynthia told the group that she originally took a Circle K clerk job as an interim position while she looked for something better. On her second or third day behind the counter, she received a phone call from her nine-year old son, Jessie. He needed a baseball glove for Little League. She explained that as a single mother, money was very tight, and her first check would have to go for paying bills. Perhaps she could buy his baseball glove with her second or third check. When Cynthia arrived for work the next morning, Patricia, the store manager, asked her to come to the small room in back of the store that served as an office. Cynthia wondered if she had done something wrong or left some part of her job incomplete from the day before. She was concerned and confused. Patricia handed her a box. 'I overheard you talking to your son yesterday,' she said, 'and I know that it is hard to explain things to kids. This is a baseball glove for Jessie because he may not understand how important he is, even though you have to pay bills before you can buy gloves. You know we can't pay good people like you as much as we would like to; but we do care, and I want you to know you are important to us.' The thoughtfulness, empathy and love of this convenience store manager demonstrates vividly that people remember how much an employer cares more than how much the employer pays." - Rick Phillips
'Heart at Work: Stories and Strategies for Building Self-esteem and Reawakening the Soul at Work', by Jack Canfield and Jacqueline Miller.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52212] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about leading by example.] - A Living Message - Vincent Van Gogh was not always an artist. In fact, he wanted to be a church pastor and was even sent to the Belgian mining community of Borinage in 1879. He discovered that the miners there endured deplorable working conditions and poverty-level wages. Their families were malnourished and struggled simply to survive. He felt concerned that the small stipend he received from the church allowed him a moderate life-style, which, in contrast to the poor, seemed unfair. One cold February evening, while he watched the miners trudging home, he spotted an old man staggering toward him across the fields, wrapped in a burlap sack for warmth. Van Gogh immediately laid his own clothing out on the bed, set aside enough for one change, and determined to give the rest away. He gave the old man a suit of clothes and he gave his overcoat to a pregnant woman whose husband had been killed in a mining accident. He lived on starvation rations and spent his stipend on food for the miners. When children in one family contracted typhoid fever, though feverish himself, he packed up his bed and took it to them. A prosperous family in the community offered him free room and board. But Van Gogh declined the offer, stating that it was the final temptation he must reject if he was to faithfully serve his community of poor miners. He believed that if he wanted them to trust him, he must become one of them. And if they were to learn of the love of God through him, he must love them enough to share with them. He was acutely aware of a wide chasm which can separate words and actions. He knew that people's lives often speak louder and clearer than their words. Maybe it was that same knowledge that led Francis of Assisi to frequently remind his monks, 'Wherever you go, preach. Use words if necessary.' " - Steve Goodier

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52216] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:-]

'Sermons We See'

I'd rather see a sermon,
Than hear one any day;
I'd rather one should walk with me,
Than merely tell the way.

The eye's a better pupil,
And more willing than the ear,
Fine counsel is confusing,
But example's always clear.

And the best of all the preachers,
Are the men who live their creeds,
For to see good put into action,
Is what everybody needs.

When I see a deed of kindness,
I am eager to be kind.
When a weaker brother stumbles,
And a strong man stands behind;

Just to see if he can help him,
Then the wish grows strong in me,
To become as big and thoughtful,
As I know that friend to be.

And all travelers can witness that,
The best of guides today,
Is not the one who tells them,
But the one who shows the way!

" - Edgar Albert Guest

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52221] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about the Golden Rule of treating others the way you'd like to be treated in the same situation and leading by example.] - Tetsugen Doko - Tetsugen, a devotee of Zen in Japan, decided to publish the sutras, which at that time were available only in Chinese. The books were to be printed with wood blocks in an edition of seven thousand copies, a tremendous undertaking. Tetsugen began by travelling and collecting donations for this purpose. A few sympathizers would give him a hundred pieces of gold, but most of the time he received only small coins. He thanked each donor with equal gratitude. After ten years Tetsugen had enough money to begin his task. It happened that at that time the Uji River overflowed. Famine followed. Tetsugen took the funds he had collected for the books and spent them to save others from starvation. Then he began again his work of collecting. Several years afterward an epidemic spread over the country. Tetsugen again gave away what he had collected. For a third time he started his work, and after twenty years his wish was fulfilled. The printing blocks which produced the first edition of sutras can be seen today in Obaku monastery in Kyoto. The Japanese tell their children that Tetsugen made three sets of sutras, and that the first two invisible sets surpass even the last." - wikipedia.org
Tetsugen Dōkō (1630 – 1682) was a Japanese Zen Master, and an important early leader of the Ōbaku school of Buddhism. Tetsugen was born in the seventh year of the Kan'ei era (1630) in Higo Province. He became a priest of the Jodo Shinshu sect at the age of 13. When Ingen came to Japan, Tetsugen became his follower in the Ōbaku school. In 1681, Tetsugen oversaw the production of the first complete woodcut edition (consisting of around 60,000 pieces) of the Chinese Buddhist sutras in Japan. Tetsugen died at the age of 53 in the second year of the Tenna era (1682). The anniversary of Tetsugen's birth is celebrated on January 1 in the Western calendar. [refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tetsugen_Doko ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52223] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about leadership and the Golden Rule of treating others as you would want to be treated in the same situation.] - Whatever You Need - I was working as a consultant in a beer company, helping the president and senior vice-presidents formulate and implement their new strategic vision. It was an enormous challenge. At the same time, my mother was in the final stages of cancer. I worked during the day and drove 40 miles home to be with her every night. It was tiring and stressful, but it was what I wanted to do. My commitment was to continue to do excellent consulting during the day, even though my evenings were very hard. I didn't want to bother the president with my situation, yet I felt someone at the company needed to know what was going on. So I told the vice-president of Human Resources, asking him not to share the information with anyone. A few days later, the president called me into his office. I figured he wanted to talk to me about one of the many issues we were working on. When I entered, he asked me to sit down. He faced me from across his large desk, looked me in the eye and said, 'I hear your mother is very ill.' I was totally caught by surprise and burst into tears. He just looked at me, let my crying subside, and then gently said a sentence I will never forget: 'Whatever you need.' That was it. His understanding and his willingness to both let me be in my pain and to offer me everything were qualities of compassion that I carry with me to this day." - Martin Rutte
From the book, 'Chicken Soup for the Soul at Work'. Printer Friendly Version Comment on Article
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52256] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about kindness, good corporate citizenship and business charity.] - Marbles - During the waning years of the depression in a small south-eastern Idaho community, I used to stop by Brother Miller's roadside stand for farm-fresh produce as the season made it available. Food and money were still extremely scarce and bartering was used, extensively. One particular day Brother Miller was bagging some early potatoes for me. I noticed a small boy, delicate of bone and feature, ragged but clean, hungrily appraising a basket of freshly picked green peas. I paid for my potatoes but was also drawn to the display of fresh green peas. I am a pushover for creamed peas and new potatoes. Pondering the peas I couldn't help overhearing the conversation between Brother Miller and the ragged boy next to me. ‘Hello Barry, how are you today? ‘ ‘H'lo, Mr. Miller. Fine, thank ya. Jus' admirin' them peas -- sure look good.’ ‘They are good, Barry. How's your Ma?’ ‘Fine. Gittin' stronger alla'time.’ ‘Good. Anything I can help you with?’ ‘No, Sir. Jus' admirin' them peas.’ ‘Would you like to take some home?’ ‘No, Sir. Got nuthin' to pay for 'em with.’ ‘Well, what have you to trade me for some of those peas?’ ‘All I got's my prize aggie -- best taw around here.’ ‘Is that right? Let me see it.’ ‘Here 'tis. She's a dandy.’ ‘I can see that. Hmmmm, only thing is this one is blue and I sort of go for red. Do you have a red one like this at home?’ ‘Not 'zackley -- but, almost.’ ‘Tell you what. Take this sack of peas home with you and next trip this way let me look at that red taw.’ ‘Sure will. Thanks, Mr. Miller.’ Mrs. Miller, who had been standing nearby, came over to help me. With a smile she said: ‘There are two other boys like him in our community -- all three are in very poor circumstances. Jim just loves to bargain with them for peas, apples, tomatoes or whatever. When they come back with their red marbles, and they always do, he decides he doesn't like red after all and he sends them home with a bag of produce for a green marble or an orange one, perhaps.’ I left the stand, smiling to myself, impressed with this man. A short time later I moved to Utah but I never forgot the story of this man and the boys -- and their bartering. Several years went by each more rapid than the previous one. Just recently I had occasion to visit some old friends in that Idaho community and while I was there learned that Brother Miller had died. They were having his viewing that evening and knowing my friends wanted to go, I agreed to accompany them. Upon our arrival at the mortuary we fell into line to meet the relatives of the deceased and to offer whatever words of comfort we could. Ahead of us in line were three young men. One was in an army uniform and the other two wore short haircuts, dark suits and white shirts obviously potential or returned Mormon missionaries. They approached Sister Miller, standing smiling and composed, by her husband's casket. Each of the young men hugged her, kissed her on the cheek, spoke briefly with her and moved on to the casket. Her misty light blue eyes followed them as, one by one, each young man stopped briefly and placed his own warm hand over the cold pale hand in the casket. Each left the mortuary, awkwardly, wiping his eyes. Our turn came to meet Sister Miller. I told her who I was and mentioned the story she had told me about the marbles. Eyes glistening she took my hand and led me to the casket. ‘This is an amazing coincidence,’ she said. ‘Those three young men, that just left, were the boys I told you about. They just told me how they appreciated the things Jim ‘traded’ them. Now, at last, when Jim could not change his mind about color or size...they came to pay their debt. We've never had a great deal of the wealth of this world,’ she confided, ‘but, right now, Jim would consider himself the richest man in Idaho.’ With loving gentleness she lifted the lifeless fingers of her deceased husband. Resting underneath were three, magnificently shiny, red marbles. " - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52262] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story - with a message about the power of dreaming and persistence:] - The Wright Stuff - Back in the 19th century two brothers had an idea which eventually became their passionate and consuming dream. Their relentless pursuit of that dream was rewarded with an accomplishment that changed world travel. On Friday December 17, 1903 at 10:35 AM, the Wright brothers (Wilbur and Orville) achieved their dream. They flew ‘the world's first power-driven, heavier-than-air machine in which man made free, controlled, and sustained flight.’ This memorable feat took place at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on a cold windy morning. The dream started with an idea that was planted in their minds by a toy given to them by their father. In the words of the boys, ‘Late in the autumn of 1878, our father came into the house one evening with some object partly concealed in his hands, and before we could see what it was, he tossed it into the air. Instead of falling to the floor, as we expected, it flew across the room till it struck the ceiling, where it fluttered awhile, and finally sank to the floor.’ This simple toy made of bamboo, cork and stretched rubber bands, fascinated the Wright brothers and sparked their lifelong interest in human flight. The Wright brothers were great thinkers. They enjoyed learning new things. Initially, they recycled broken parts, built a printing press and opened their own printing office. Their interest moved to bicycles and in 1893, they opened the Wright Cycle Company where they sold and repaired bicycles. But Wilbur (the older brother) had his mind set on something more exciting. He decided to seriously pursue flying. The brothers spent many hours researching, testing their machines and making improvements after unsuccessful attempts at human flight. What started out as a hobby soon became a passion. With determination and patience they realized their dream in 1903. The next time you hear or see an airplane or travel on one, remember where it all started. A simply idea conceived in the minds of two young men who did not finish high school, but who would not give up on their dream of powered flight." - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52283] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"It's better to walk alone than with a crowd going in the wrong direction!!" - Diane Grant
Canadian playwright and screenwriter
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52286] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"People often say that motivation doesn't last. Well, neither does bathing -- that's why we recommend it daily." - Zig Ziglar
American author and motivational speaker
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52320] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The man who has won millions at the cost of his conscience is a failure!" - B. C. Forbes

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52327] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Initiative is to success what a lighted match is to a candle." - Orlando Battista

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52329] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"People seldom become famous for what they say until after they are famous for what they've done." - Cullen Hightower

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52333] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Leadership is liberating people to do what is required of them in the most effective and humane way possible." - Max Depree

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52335] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Encouragement is food for the heart and every heart is a hungry heart. " - Patrick Morley
author
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52352] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"To command [lead] is to serve, nothing more and nothing less." - Andre Malraux

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52405] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Your level of success will seldom exceed your level of personal development!!" - Jim Rohn

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52424] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A story - with a message about leaders trying to help people find ways to make the most of their individualism and unique potential for the good of all.] - Flaws and Talents - A water bearer in India had two large pots, each hung on each end of a pole which he carried across his neck. One of the pots had a crack in it, and while the other pot was perfect and always delivered a full portion of water at the end of the long walk from the stream to the master’s house, the cracked pot arrived only half full. For a full two years this went on daily, with the bearer delivering only one and a half pots full of water in his master’s house. Of course, the perfect pot was proud of its accomplishments, perfect to the end for which it was made. But the poor cracked pot was ashamed of its own imperfection, and miserable that it was able to accomplish only half of what it had been made to do. After two years of what it perceived to be a bitter failure, it spoke to the water bearer one day by the stream. ‘I am ashamed of myself, and I want to apologize to you.’ ‘Why?’ asked the bearer. ‘What are you ashamed of?’ ‘I have been able, for these past two years, to deliver only half my load because this crack in my side causes water to leak out all the way back to your masters house. Because of my flaws, you have to do all of this work, and you don't get full value from your efforts,’ the pot said. The water bearer felt sorry for the old cracked pot, and in his compassion he said, ‘As we return to the master’s house, I want you to notice the beautiful flowers along the path.’ Indeed, as they went up the hill, the old cracked pot took notice of the sun warming the beautiful wild flowers on the side of the path, and this cheered it some. But at the end of the trail, it still felt bad because it had leaked out half its load, and so again the Pot apologized to the bearer for its failure. The bearer said to the pot, ‘Did you notice that there were flowers only on your side of your path, but not on the other pots side? That's because I have always known about your flaw, and I took advantage of it. I planted flower seeds on your side of the path, and every day while we walk back from the stream, you've watered them. For two years I have been able to pick these beautiful flowers to decorate my masters table. Without you being just the way you are, he would not have this beauty to grace his house.’ Each of us has our own unique flaws. We’re all cracked pots. Don't be afraid of your flaws. Acknowledge them, and you too can be the cause of beauty. Know that in our weakness we find our strength." - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52476] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A poem: about the need for humble self-esteem rather than vain-glorious, prideful self-importance.]

'Ozymandias'

I met a traveller from an antique land
Who said: 'Two vast and trunkless legs of stone
Stand in the desert. Near them, on the sand,
Half sunk, a shattered visage lies, whose frown,
And wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command,
Tell that its sculptor well those passions read
Which yet survive, stamped on these lifeless things,
The hand that mocked them and the heart that fed.
And on the pedestal these words appear --
'My name is Ozymandias, king of kings:
Look on my works, ye Mighty, and despair!'
Nothing beside remains. Round the decay
Of that colossal wreck, boundless and bare
The lone and level sands stretch far away.'

" - Percy Bysshe Shelley

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52602] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about good leadership of children and adults.]

'Chiding'

Reproach will seldom mend the young,
If they are left to need it;
The breath of love must stir the tongue,
If you would have them heed it.
How oft we see a child caressed
For little faults and failings,
Which should have been at first suppressed
To save the after railings!
If, when the heart would go astray,
You would the passion smother,
You must not tear the charm away,
But substitute another.
Thus it is pleasant to be led,
If he who leads will measure
The heart's affection by the head,
And make pursuit a pleasure.

" - David Bates
(1809 – 1870), American poet.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52614] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"There are always ways to 'spin' the facts to support the conclusion that a person desires to communicate. For example during 2013 and 2014 the politicians wanted to suggest the world economy was improving. So when oil price increased in 2013 they said this was due to the world economy improving and so demand for petrol was increasing! In 2014 when oil prices decreased they said this was positive for the world economy as it would mean that less money would be spent on petrol and so more money would be available for people to spend on their other desires! It is not difficult to imagine 'spin' that would have shown that both these prices in oil would have been bad for the world economy. This is why being skeptical is important so that information used to help people choose is as truthful and unbiased as possible." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
[Refer http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-12-05/only-thing-more-bullish-economy-lower-oil-prices http://www.wsj.com/articles/lower-oil-prices-will-help-boost-global-economy-imfs-lagarde-says-1417479908 http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2013/12/31/oil-gas-prices-2013/4270465/ ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52648] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about path-finding, inventing, leading]

'The Things That Haven’t Been Done Before'

The things that haven’t been done before,
Those are the things to try;
Columbus dreamed of an unknown shore
At the rim of a far-flung sky,
And his heart was bold and his faith was strong
As he ventured in dangers new,
And he paid no heed to the jeering throng
Or the fears of the doubting crew.

The many will follow the beaten track
With guideposts on the way.
They live and have lived for ages back
With a chart for every day.
Someone has told them it’s safe to go
On the road he has traveled o’er,
And all they ever strive to know
Are the things that were known before.

A few strike out without map or chart,
Where never a man has been,
From the beaten paths they draw apart
To see what no man has seen.
There are deeds they hunger alone to do;
Though battered and bruised and sore,
They blaze the path for the many, who
Do nothing not done before.

The things that haven’t been done before
Are the tasks worthwhile today;
Are you one of the flock that follows, or
Are one that shall lead the way?
Are you one of the timid souls that quail
At the jeers of the doubting crew,
Or dare you, whether you win or fail,
Strike out for a goal that’s new?

" - Edgar Albert Guest
(1881 - 1959) American author and poet
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52666] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about ethics and morality, character and self-esteem, service and leadership.]

'The Bridge Builder'

An old man going a lone highway,
Came, at the evening, cold and grey,
To a chasm, vast, and deep, and wide,
Through which was flowing a sullen tide.
The old man crossed in the twilight dim;
The sullen stream had no fears for him;
But he turned, when safe on the other side,
And built a bridge to span the tide.

'Old Man,' said a fellow pilgrim, near,
'You are wasting your strength with building here;
Your journey will end with the ending day;
You never again must pass this way;
You have crossed the chasm, deep and wide -
Why build you this bridge at eventide?'

The builder lifted his old grey head:
'Good friend, in the path I have come,' he said
'There followeth after me today
A youth, whose feet must pass this way.
This Chasm, which has been naught to me,
To that fair-haired youth may a pitfall be.
He to must cross in the twilight dim;
Good friend, I am building the bridge for him.'

" - Will Allen Dromgoole

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52746] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:]

'We Are The Music-Makers' ['Ode']

We are the music-makers,
And we are the dreamers of dreams,
Wandering by lone sea-breakers,
And sitting by desolate streams.
World-losers and world-forsakers,
Upon whom the pale moon gleams;
Yet we are the movers and shakers,
Of the world forever, it seems.

With wonderful deathless ditties
We build up the world's great cities,
And out of a fabulous story
We fashion an empire's glory:
One man with a dream, at pleasure,
Shall go forth and conquer a crown;
And three with a new song's measure
Can trample an empire down.

We, in the ages lying
In the buried past of the earth,
Built Nineveh with our sighing,
And Babel itself with our mirth;
And o'erthrew them with prophesying
To the old of the new world's worth;
For each age is a dream that is dying,
Or one that is coming to birth.

" - Arthur O'Shaughnessy
(1844 – 1881) Arthur William Edgar O'Shaughnessy was a British poet and herpetologist of Irish descent, born in London.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52789] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about praise, appreciation and guidance]

'To A Friend'

You entered my life in a casual way,
And saw at a glance what I needed;
There were others who passed me or met me each day,
But never a one of them heeded.

Perhaps you were thinking of other folks more,
Or chance simply seemed to decree it;
I know there were many such chances before,
But the others - well, they didn't see it.

You said just the thing that I wished you would say,
And you made me believe that you meant it;
I held up my head in the old gallant way,
And resolved you should never repent it.

There are times when encouragement means such a lot,
And a word is enough to convey it;
There were others who could have, as easy as not -
But, just the same, they didn't say it.

There may have been someone who could have done more
To help me along, though I doubt it;
What I needed was cheering, and always before
They had let me plod onward without it.

You helped to refashion the dream of my heart,
And made me turn eagerly to it;
There were others who might have (I question that part) -
But, after all, they didn't do it!

" - Grace Stricker Dawson

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52825] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:]

'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired')

...

Exercise caution in your business affairs; for the world is full of trickery. But let this not blind you to what virtue there is; many persons strive for high ideals; and everywhere life is full of heroism.

...

" - Max Ehrmann
(1872 – 1945) American writer, poet, and attorney from Terre Haute, Indiana, widely known for his 1927 prose poem 'Desiderata' (Latin: 'Things Desired'). He often wrote on spiritual themes. [In 1956, the Reverend Frederick Kates, rector of Saint Paul's Church in Baltimore, Maryland, included 'Desiderata' in a compilation of devotional materials for his congregation. The compilation included the church's foundation date: 'Old Saint Paul's Church, Baltimore A.D. 1692'. Consequently, the date of the text's authorship was (and still is) widely mistaken as 1692, the year of the church's foundation. Refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Desiderata ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52847] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Never depend upon your genius: if you have talent, industry will improve it; if you have none, industry will supply the deficiency." - Joshua Reynolds

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52985] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:]

'Tribute On The Passing Of A Very Real Person'

People are of two kinds, and he
Was the kind I'd like to be.
Some preach their virtues, and a few
Express their lives by what they do;
That sort was he. No flowery phrase
Or glibly spoken word of praise
Won friends for him. He wasn't cheap
Or shallow, but his course ran deep,
And it was pure. You know the kind.
Not many in life you find
Whose deeds outrun their words so far
That more than what they seem, they are.

" - Unknown

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.52990] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:- about formally re-imagining and re-setting goals and plans each year, for example with New Year's Resolutions]

'Resolve'

As the dead year is clasped by a dead December,
So let your dead sins with your dead days lie.
A new life is yours, and a new hope. Remember,
We build our own ladders to climb to the sky.
Stand out in the sunlight of Promise, forgetting
Whatever the Past held of sorrow or wrong.
We waste half our strength in a useless regretting;
We sit by old tombs in the dark too long.

Have you missed in your aim? Well, the mark is still shining.
Did you faint in the race? Well, take breath for the next.
Did the clouds drive you back? But see yonder their lining.
Were you tempted and fell? Let it serve for a text.
As each year hurries by let it join that procession
Of skeleton shapes that march down to the Past,
While you take your place in the line of Progression,
With your eyes on the heavens, your face to the blast.

I tell you the future can hold no terrors
For any sad soul while the stars revolve,
If he will stand firm on the grave of his errors,
And instead of regretting, resolve, resolve.
It is never too late to begin rebuilding,
Though all into ruins your life seems hurled,
For see how the light of the New Year is gilding
The wan, worn face of the bruised old world.

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53129] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:- about making a contribution to improving future society]

'The Road Of Masonry'

Men build a road of Masonry
Across the hills and dales,
Unite the prairie and the sea,
The mountains and the vales,
They cross the chasm, bridge the stream,
They point to where the turrets gleam,
And many men for many a day
Who seek the heights shall find the way.

Men build a road of Masonry,
But not for self they build:
With footsteps of humanity
The hearts of men are thrilled.
This music makes their labor sweet:
The endless tramp of other feet,
The thought that men shall travel thus
An easier road because of us.

We build the road of Masonry
With other men in mind;
We do not build for you and me,
We build for all mankind.
We build a road! - remember, men,
Build not for Now, but build for Then,
And other men who walk the way
Shall find the road we built today.

Who builds the road of Masonry,
Though small or great his part,
However hard the task may be,
May toil with singing heart.
For it is something, after all,
When muscles tire and shadows fall,
To know that other men shall bless
The builder for his faithfulness.

" - Douglas Malloch
(1877 – 1938) American poet, short-story writer and Associate Editor of American Lumberman, a trade paper in Chicago.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53185] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem:- about the power of example and demonstration]

'Show Me'

I would rather see a Mason, than hear one any day,
I would rather one would walk with me than merely show the way.
The eye's a better pupil and more willing than the ear,
Fine counsel is confusing, but example's always clear.
And the best of all the Masons are the men who live their creeds,
For to see the good in action is what everybody needs.

I can soon learn how to do it if you'll let me see it done,
I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may run.
And the lectures you deliver may be wise and true,
But I'd rather get my lesson by observing what you do.
For I may misunderstand you and the high advice you give,
But there's no misunderstanding how you act and how you live.

" - Edgar Albert Guest

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53236] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about the value of a sense of humor, trying not to take anything especially ourselves too seriously and trying to see the unexpected, surprising, silly and funny side of things and ourselves and letting yourself and others smile, joke and laugh easily and often.]

'Sense Of Humour'

What it is, can't just say,
Only know it saved the day,
Drove the gathering clouds away.
Just a twinkle in the eye,
Just a smile instead of sigh;
Lo! the storm soon passed right by
— all through a sense of humour.

What it is, don't just know,
But it made rich laughter flow,
Life took on a rosy glow:
Troubles shrank to half their size;
Sorrow wore a cheerful guise;
Work appeared to be the prize
— all through a sense of humour.

Things were going very wrong,
Flowers no colour, birds no song;
Weakness ousted courage strong
— stepped in a sense of humour:
Put the balance right again,
Saved two people lots of pain,
Brought the sunshine after Rain
— and that's a sense of humour.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53280] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about how the world always needs leaders who desire - a vocation, a career - to contribute massively to the improvement of life for all in the future.]

'Business'

'How is business?' asks the young man of the Spirit of the Years;
'Tell me of the modern output from the factories of fate,
And what jobs are waiting for me, waiting for me and my peers.
What's the outlook? What's the prospect? Are the wages small or great?'
'Business growing, more men needed,' says the Spirit of the Years,
'Jobs are waiting for right workmen, -- and I hope you are the men, --
Grand hard work and ample wages, work piled up in great arrears --
'Don't see any job particular?' Listen, and I'll tell you then.

'There are commonwealths to govern, there are senates to be swayed,
There are new states still undreamed of to be founded,
New empires in far oceans to be moulded -- who's afraid? --
And a couple polar oceans to be sounded.
Come on, ye jolly empire-builders, here is work for you to do,
And we don't propose to get along without it.
Here's the little job of building this old planet over new,
And it's time to do the business. Get about it.

'Get to work, ye world-repairers. Steel the age and guide the years,
Shame the antique men with bigness of your own;
Grow ye larger men than Plutarch's and the old long-whiskered seers;
Show the world a million kings without a throne.
'What's your business?' Empire-building, founding hierarchies for the soul,
Principalities and powers for the mind,
Bringing ever-narrowing chaos under cosmical control,
Building highways through its marsh-lands for mankind.

'Sow the lonely plains with cities; thread the flowerless land with streams;
Go to thinking thoughts unthought-of, following where your genius leads,
Seeing visions, hearing voices, following stars, and dreaming dreams,
And then bid your dreams and visions bloom and flower into deeds.
'What's your business?' Shaping eras, making epochs, building States,
Wakening slumbering rebellions in the soul,
Leading men and founding systems, grappling with the elder fates
Till the younger fates shall greaten and assume the old control.

''Business rushing?' Fairly lively. There's a world to clean and sweep,
Cluttered up with wars and armies; 'tis your work to brush 'em out;
Bid the fierce clinch-fisted nations clasp their hands across the deep;
Wipe the tired world of armies; 'tis a fair day's work no doubt.
'Business rushing?' Something doing. You've a contract on your hands
To wipe out the world's distinctions, -- country, color, caste, and birth, --
And to make one human family of a thousand alien lands,
Nourishing a billion brothers with no foreigner on earth.

'Have you learned yet,' says the Zeitgeist, 'the old secret of the soul?
Make the sleepy sphinx give answer, for her riddle's long unguessed.
Tell the riddle; clear the mystery; bid the midnight dark uproll;
Let the thought with which the ages long have travailed be expressd.
Go and find the Northwest Passage through the far seas of the mind, --
There, where man and God are mingled in the darkness, go and learn.
Sail forth on that bournless ocean, shrouded, chartless, undefined:
Pluck its mystery from that darkness; pluck its mystery and return.

''What's your business?' Finding out things that no other man could find, --
Things concealed by jealous Nature under locks, behind the bars;
Building paved and guttered highways for the onward march of mind
Through the spaces 'twixt the planets to the secrets of the stars.
'What's your business?' Think like Plato, -- he did not exhaust all thought;
Preach like Savonarola; rule like Alfred; do not shirk;
Paint like Raphael and Titian; build like Angelo -- why not?
Sing like Shakespeare. 'How is business?' Rather lively. Get to work!'

" - Sam Walter Foss
(1858 - 1911) American librarian and poet.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53362] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about wanting to make a key contribution to improve the future for all, like the great individuals in the past did]

'Service - What I Live For'

...

I live to learn their story
Who’ve suffered for my sake,
To emulate their glory,
And follow in their wake;
Bards, patriots, martyrs, sages,
The noble of all ages,
Whose deeds crown history’s pages,
And Time’s great volume make.

...

" - George Linnaeus Banks
(1821 – 1881), British journalist, editor, poet, playwright, amateur actor and orator, and husband of author Isabella Banks.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53483] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about passing on responsibilities and challenges to those that follow, like a ball has to be passed backwards in the game of Rugby. Other examples might include business succession, cultural legacy, private inheritance, etc.]

'Vitai Lampada' ('They Pass On The Torch of Life')

There's a breathless hush in the Close to-night --
Ten to make and the match to win --
A bumping pitch and a blinding light,
An hour to play and the last man in.
And it's not for the sake of a ribboned coat,
Or the selfish hope of a season's fame,
But his Captain's hand on his shoulder smote --
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

The sand of the desert is sodden red, --
Red with the wreck of a square that broke; --
The Gatling's jammed and the Colonel dead,
And the regiment blind with dust and smoke.
The river of death has brimmed his banks,
And England's far, and Honour a name,
But the voice of a schoolboy rallies the ranks:
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

This is the word that year by year,
While in her place the School is set,
Every one of her sons must hear,
And none that hears it dare forget.
This they all with a joyful mind
Bear through life like a torch in flame,
And falling fling to the host behind --
'Play up! play up! and play the game!'

" - Sir Henry Newbolt
(1862-1938) English poet, novelist and historian. He also had a very powerful role as a government adviser, particularly on Irish issues and with regard to the study of English in England.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53489] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"That's all a man can hope for during his lifetime to set an example and when he is dead, to be an inspiration for history." - William McKinley
(1843 – 1901) 25th President of the United States, serving from March 4, 1897, until his assassination on September 14, 1901, six months into his second term. McKinley led the nation to victory in the Spanish-American War, raised protective tariffs to promote American industry, and maintained the nation on the gold standard in a rejection of inflationary proposals.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53503] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about what you choose to do with your life, namely help or hinder others now and in the future!]

'A Bag of Tools'

Isn’t it strange
That princes and kings,
And clowns that caper
In sawdust rings,
And common people
Like you and me
Are builders for eternity?

Each is given
A bag of tools,
A shapeless mass,
A book of rules.
And each must make –
Ere life is flown
A stumbling block
Or a steppingstone

" - R. L. Sharpe
(1870-1950)
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53513] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Poem: about how opportunity, like beauty, is in the eye of the beholder]

'Opportunity'

This I beheld, or dreamed it in a dream:-
There spread a cloud of dust along a plain;
And underneath the cloud, or in it, raged
A furious battle, and men yelled, and swords
Shocked upon swords and shields. A prince's banner
Wavered, then staggered backward, hemmed by foes.
A craven hung along the battle's edge,
And thought, 'Had I a sword of keener steel-
That blue blade that the king's son bears, - but this
Blunt thing-!' He snapped and flung it from his hand,
And lowering crept away and left the field.
Then came the king's son, wounded sore bested,
And weaponless, and saw the broken sword
Hilt-buried in the dry and trodden sand,
And ran and snatched it, and with battle-shout
Lifted afresh he hewed his enemy down
And saved a great cause that heroic day.

" - Edward Rowland Sill
(1841 – 1887), American poet and essayist born in Winsor, Connecticut, USA. He was orphaned when young and brought up by his uncle, Elisha Sill in Ohio.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

Previous<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  
27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  
52  53 54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  Next Page>>

 
Imagi-Natives'
Self-Defence
& Fitness Training

because
Everyone deserves
to be
Healthy and Safe!
Ideal for Anyone's Personal Protection Needs
Simple, Fast, Effective!
Maximum Safety - Minimum Force
No Punches, Kicks, Chokes, Pressure Points or Weapons Used
Based on Shaolin Chin-Na Seize and Control Methods
Comprehensively Covers Over 130 Types of Attack
Lavishly Illustrated With Over 1300 illustrations
Accredited Training for Australian Security Qualifications
National Quality Council Approved