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  Quotations - Learn  
[Quote No.36364] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"There are some ideas so wrong that only a very intelligent person could believe in them. [A lot of these ideas are found in investing, economics and politics!]" - George Orwell
[1903 – 1950], George Orwell was the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, who was an English author and journalist. His work is known for its keen intelligence and wit, profound awareness of social injustice, and an intense opposition to totalitarianism. He is best known for the satirical novella ‘Animal Farm’ (1945) and the dystopian novel ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (published in 1949) — they have together sold more copies than any two books by any other twentieth-century author.
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[Quote No.36372] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"We have now sunk to a depth at which restatement of the obvious is the first duty of intelligent men [and women]." - George Orwell
[1903 – 1950], George Orwell was the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, who was an English author and journalist. His work is known for its keen intelligence and wit, profound awareness of social injustice, and an intense opposition to totalitarianism. He is best known for the satirical novella ‘Animal Farm’ (1945) and the dystopian novel ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (published in 1949) — they have together sold more copies than any two books by any other twentieth-century author.
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[Quote No.36377] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Freedom of thought, speech, expression, press and censorship:] Who controls the past controls the future. Who controls the present controls the past. [Remember this when reading and thinking about the media's coverage of an event, issue, person or group, propaganda, history - especially war, revisionist history and public education.]" - George Orwell
[1903 – 1950], George Orwell was the pen name of Eric Arthur Blair, who was an English author and journalist. His work is known for its keen intelligence and wit, profound awareness of social injustice, and an intense opposition to totalitarianism. He is best known for the satirical novella ‘Animal Farm’ (1945) and the dystopian novel ‘Nineteen Eighty-Four’ (published in 1949) — they have together sold more copies than any two books by any other twentieth-century author.
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[Quote No.36421] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"‘Talent Is Overrated: What Really Separates World-Class Performers from Everybody Else’ by Geoff Colvin --------Editorial Reviews: ------'Wall Street Journal' and 'BusinessWeek' bestseller. Asked to explain why a few people truly excel, most people offer one of two answers. The first is hard work. Yet we all know plenty of hard workers who have been doing the same job for years or decades without becoming great. The other possibility is that the elite possess an innate talent for excelling in their field. We assume that Mozart was born with an astounding gift for music, and Warren Buffett carries a gene for brilliant investing. The trouble is, scientific evidence doesn't support the notion that specific natural talents make great performers. According to distinguished journalist Geoff Colvin, both the hard work and natural talent camps are wrong. What really makes the difference is a highly specific kind of effort – ‘deliberate practice’ - that few of us pursue when we're practicing golf or piano or stock-picking. Based on scientific research, ‘Talent is Overrated’ shares the secrets of extraordinary performance and shows how to apply these principles. It features the stories of people who achieved world-class greatness through deliberate practice - including Benjamin Franklin, comedian Chris Rock, football star Jerry Rice, and top CEOs Jeffrey Immelt and Steven Ballmer. --------Most Helpful Customer Reviews: -------- 230 of 238 people found the following review helpful: 5.0 out of 5 stars Exhilarating, Infuriating or Terrifying -- it all depends on you, April 2, 2009 By Mercenary Trader I inhaled this book. The informal plan was to read it over a few short weeks. Instead I plowed through it in maybe three days. For those teetering on the edge of greatness -- or thinking about really going for the gusto, in whatever field or endeavor that has captured their spirit -- this book is an invitation to walk among the gods. For those who have soured on their dreams and bitterly written them off, however, this book will be painful. It might even read like a damning indictment, and thus incite a hostile emotional response. And finally, this book also has the potential to be terrifying. For those who feel the pull of greatness but also wrestle with a deep-seated fear of failure, the starkness of the choice will be revealed to them in these pages. Why? Because Colvin's deeper message, beyond the powerful insights into ‘Deliberate Practice’ and what it can do, is that there is no excuse. Whatever it is you like (or love) to do, the fact that you don't hate it means you probably have the basic tools -- and so there's no reason you can't get better, maybe a lot better. And so, at the end of the day, there is simply no real excuse for not being great. Only the classic Bartleby the Scrivener response: ‘I prefer not to.’ Greatness requires dedication and sacrifice, period. Being good at something requires a fair amount... being great requires a huge amount. If you truly desire greatness -- or simply to be great at what you do -- then much sacrifice is required. But I fudge slightly. The book does leave room for one excuse of sorts, but not a very satisfying one. In some cases of highly competitive endeavor, wunderkinds (like Mozart and Tiger Woods) have built up a nearly insurmountable ‘time in the saddle’ advantage via taking up the hard work of Deliberate Practice at an astonishingly young age. Olympian swimmer Michael Phelps has analogized his hard training to putting credits in the bank. Deliberate Practice is like a disciplined investing program -- the longer you do it, the more compounding you see, and it takes many years up front to get to a point of real momentum. This makes it all but impossible in certain prodigy-dominated arenas to come to the game late and try to catch someone who has been continuously working their butt off from, say, age twelve. (Or in Tiger and Mozart's case, age three.) My personal experience with Deliberate Practice -- which I practice in the world of trading and investing -- is that it's a lot like running. The brain is like a muscle, or rather a group of muscles, that has to be built up, like legs and heart and lungs for the runner, if a rigorous Deliberate Practice program is to be sustained. This is another reason why getting into Deliberate Practice is so hard for the average individual. People don't intuitively grasp the concept that the brain is like a muscle... that you have to strengthen your cognitive control and tighten up your executive functions before you can become a powerhouse. Nobody starts out on a running program from a dead stop and assumes they'll be able to run three marathons every week. They build up to it, and work on ways to overcome the initial physical pain and resistance that act as a barrier before ‘runner's high’ kicks in and positive addiction carries them through. It's a similar dynamic with Deliberate Practice. Many people fail in their early quest for excellence, I suspect, because the mind flags and the will tires, and instead of taking this as a normal part of the training process -- like being winded in the early stages of a running program -- they decide they can't hack it and quietly slip back into mediocrity. Another thing I liked about this book is how it puts talent in the proper context. Is it true that talent is overrated? Well, yes. Based on these findings, absolutely. But that doesn't mean talent plays no role in success. It simply means that having some modicum of talent (whether imparted by genes or favorable early developments) is often a necessary, but not sufficient, condition for success. That lack of sufficiency, i.e. talent alone not being ‘enough,’ or even anywhere close to enough, is an absolutely critical point. It's a further interesting quirk that too much talent can even be an impediment, in certain cases, if the obvious presence of said talent convinces the individual that it's okay to shirk on Deliberate Practice. It's no statistical accident, for example, that the less flashy ‘work horses’ of the baseball and basketball worlds tend to have longer careers than their flashier co-players, thanks to a tighter regime of working hard on the fundamentals to make up for lesser natural gifts. And it seems like we all know someone who had a great knack for playing guitar or piano by ear in high school, but couldn't be bothered to put in the sweat equity of trying to develop it into something more. Now, go forth and get on the path to greatness. -------- 430 of 455 people found the following review helpful: 5.0 out of 5 stars Deliberate practice ‘hurts but it works’, October 16, 2008. By Robert Morris (Dallas, Texas) (TOP 50 REVIEWER) (REAL NAME) Colvin set out to answer this question: ‘What does great performance require?’ In this volume, he shares several insights generated by hundreds of research studies whose major conclusions offer what seem to be several counterintuitive perspectives on what is frequently referred to as ‘talent.’ (See Pages 6-7.) In this context, I am reminded of Thomas Edison's observation that ‘vision without execution is hallucination.’ If Colvin were asked to paraphrase that to indicate his own purposes in this book, my guess (only a guess) is that his response would be, ‘Talent without deliberate practice is latent’ and agrees with Darrell Royal that ‘potential’ means ‘you ain't done it yet.’ In other words, there would be no great performances in any field (e.g. business, theatre, dance, symphonic music, athletics, science, mathematics, entertainment, exploration) without those who have, through deliberate practice developed the requisite abilities. It occurs to me that, however different they may be in almost all other respects, athletes such as Cynthia Cooper, Roger Federer, Michael Jordan, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Lorena Ochoa, Candace Parker, Michael Phelps, Vijay Singh, and Tiger Woods ‘make it look so easy’ in competition because their preparation is so focused, rigorous, and thorough. Obviously, they do not win every game, match, tournament, etc. Colvin's point (and I agree) is that all great performers ‘make it look so easy’ because of their commitment to deliberate practice, often for several years before their first victory. In fact, Colvin cites a ‘ten-year rule’ widely endorsed in chess circles (attributed to Herbert Simon and William Chase) that ‘no one seemed to reach the top ranks of chess players without a decade or so of intensive study, and some required much more time.’ The same could also be said of ‘overnight sensations’ who struggled for years to prepare for their ‘big break’ on Broadway or in Hollywood. Colvin duly acknowledges that deliberate practice ‘is a large concept, and to say that it explains everything would be simplistic and reductive.’ Colvin goes on to say, ‘Critical questions immediately present themselves: What exactly needs to be practiced? Precisely how? Which specific skills or other assets must be acquired? The research has revealed answers that generalize quite well across a wide range of fields.’ Even after committing all of my time and attention to several years of deliberate practice, under the direct supervision of the best instructor (e.g. Hank Haney, Butch Harman, or David Leadbetter) I probably could not reduce my handicap to zero but I could lower it under those conditions. Colvin's insights offer a reassurance that almost anyone's performance can be improved, sometimes substantially, even if it isn't world-class. Talent is overrated if it is perceived to be the most important factor. It isn't. In fact, talent does not exist unless and until it is developed...and the only way to develop it is (you guessed it) with deliberate practice. When Ben Hogan was asked the ‘secret’ to playing great golf, he replied, ‘It's in the dirt.’ Others have their reasons for thinking so highly of this book. Here are three of mine. First, Colvin's observations and suggestions are research-driven rather than based almost entirely on theories developed in isolation from real-world phenomena. He commits sufficient attention to identifying the core components of great performance but focuses most of his narrative to explaining how almost anyone can improve her or his own performance. He reveals himself to be both an empiricist as he shares what he has observed and experienced and a pragmatist who is curious to know what works, what doesn't, and why. I also appreciate Colvin's repudiation of the most common misconceptions about the various dimensions of talent. For example, that ‘is innate; you're born with it, and if you're not born with it, you can't acquire it.’ Many people still believe that Mozart was born with so much talent that he required very little (if any) development. In fact, according to Alex Ross, ‘Mozart became Mozart by working furiously hard’ as did all others discussed, including Jack Welch, David Ogilvy, Warren Buffett, Robert Rubin, Jerry Rice, Chris Rock, and Benjamin Franklin. Some were prodigies but most were late-bloomers and each followed a significantly different process of development. About all they shared in common is their commitment to continuous self-improvement through deliberate practice. Here's another reason I hold this book in such high regard. Throughout his narrative, Colvin inserts clusters of insights and recommendations that literally anyone can consider and then act upon to improve her or his individual performance as well as helping to improve the performance of a team of which she or he is a member. For example: 1. Attributes of deliberate practice (Pages 66-72) 2. What top performers perceive that others do not notice (Pages 89-94) 3. Benefits of having a ‘rich mental model’ (Pages 123-124) 4. Rules for peak performance that "elite" organizations follow (Pages 128-136) 5. Misconceptions about innovation and creativity (Pages 149-151) 6. How innovators become great (Pages 159-161) 7. How to make organizations innovative (Pages 162-166) 8. What homes can teach organizations (Pages 172-175) 9. The ‘drivers’ of great performance (Pages 187-193) 10. How some organizations ‘blow it’ (Pages 194-198) Colvin provides a wealth of research-driven information that he has rigorously examined and he also draws upon his own extensive and direct experience with all manner of organizations and their C-level executives. Throughout his narrative, with great skill, he sustains a personal rapport with his reader. It is therefore appropriate that, in the final chapter, he invokes direct address and poses a series of questions. ‘What would cause you to do the enormous work necessary to be a top-performing CEO, Wall Street trader, jazz, pianist, courtroom lawyer, or anything else? Would anything? The answer depends on your answers to two basic questions: What do you really want? And what do you really believe? What you want - really want - is fundamental because deliberate practice is a heavy investment.’ Corbin has provided all the evidence anyone needs to answer those two questions that, in fact, serve as a challenge. Colvin leaves no doubt that by understanding how a few become great, anyone can become better...and that includes his reader. This reader is now convinced that talent is a process that ‘grows,’ not a pre-determined set of skills. Also, that deliberate practice ‘hurts but it works.’ Long ago, Henry Ford said, ‘Whether you think you can or think you can't, you're right.’ It would be ‘tragically constraining,’ Colvin asserts, for anyone to lack sufficient self-confidence because ‘what the evidence shouts most loudly is striking, liberating news: That great performance is not reserved for a preordained few. It is available to you and to everyone.’ -------- 507 of 556 people found the following review helpful: 1.0 out of 5 stars Largely Based on HBR's ‘The Making of an Expert’, July 2007, December 18, 2008. By Robert R. Rowntree (Toronto, Ontario, Canada) - (REAL NAME) This book is substantially a suspicious rehash of a major peer reviewed article. Colvin and Gladwell ‘Outliers: The Story of Success’ are chasing the same topic, incredibly within the same few months and referencing the same research. Albeit with different titles and stories. Colvin does a good job giving credit to that author. The problems begin when Colvin starts to take parts of the research and explode the number of pages dedicated to one point -deliberate practice. And while that point, deliberate practice is important, it is one of several ingredients in the making of an expert. In the paper ‘Making of an expert’ by K. Anders Ericsson and others, ‘Harvard Business Review’, July 2007 they detail three well accepted conditions: 1. Delibrate Practice - the author sites verbatim with strong emphasizes 2. World class coaching - Important but not emphasized well 3. Enthusiastic family support - Very important and not emphasized well And obviously the expert-to-be needs to be motivated. What is disturbing is Colvin doesn't give much credit (wrongly) in terms of pages, to the support environment namely families and coaches. Ok, there are passing paragraphs but no where near the emphasis it should be according to the original researchers. Intuitively, as well as deep in all parents hearts, they know those new champions/experts had to have great parents. Think of Tiger Woods (Golf), the Mannings (NFL) and Obama to name a few. The deliberate practice condition also encompasses the 10,000 hours requirement in becoming an expert whether that is business, music or sports to name a few endeavors. This translates into roughly what I call the 4/6/10 phenomena [What a great way to put it] - 4 hours a day, 6 days a week [for 52 weeks a year = 1,248 hours per year] for 10 years [12,480 hours in total]. Taking a few weeks off a year helps recovery so it’s about 1000 hours per year. What a way to put it. [When someone asks, ‘ How are you going to become successful in your chosen field?’ Just tell them, ‘I’m using the 4/6/10 method: 4 hours a day, 6 days a week for 10 years!’]. Of the three conditions, enthusiastic family support seems to be the catalyst for the other two. That article is well written and easy to read. You can go to the HBR site and pick it up for $7. There are excellent peer reviewed references in that article worth reading. One of the key references is available at this site The Cambridge Handbook of Expertise and Expert Performance. It may be a little more academic but if you already have read ‘The making of an expert’ and want more, than this is it. [the URL is http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0521600812/ref=cm_cr_asin_lnk and here’s a few reviews: ------ ‘The Cambridge Handbook of Expertise and Expert Performance makes a rather startling assertion: the trait we commonly call talent is highly overrated. Or, put another way, expert performers "whether in memory or surgery, ballet or computer programming" are nearly always made, not born. And yes, practice does make perfect.’ - Steven D. Leavitt and Stephen J. Dubner, The New York Times Magazine and authors of ‘Freakonomics’; ------ ‘This book is a comprehensive and thought-provoking presentation of research and theory of expert performance that brings the field up to date since the seminal publications in the early 1980s. There has been much work on expertise, and this handbook is a significant collection edited by eminent people in the field. Readers will be informed about approaches to the study and analysis of expertise. Various fields are considered, including mathematics, history, memory, and chess. A range of mechanisms and issues influencing development are considered, including intelligence, tacit knowledge, deliberate practice, and self-regulation. Case studies are presented of expertise in creative thinking. This book is recommended to researchers and students working in this major field of cognition in highly competent performance.’ - Robert Glaser, University of Pittsburgh; ------ ‘Many of the chapters of this excellent handbook advocate the idea of becoming an expert is a learning process for which one has to engage in years of deliberate practice. ...This book is suited to academics, parents, educators, trainers, coaches and politicians, or any who foster the development of individuals.’ - Remco Polman, ‘The Psychologist’; ------ ‘The Handbook is a great reference for anyone interested in personal improvement, including sharpening your financial panache. Reading these research papers will give you a greater understanding and appreciation of what it takes to truly excel at investing or any other human endeavor.’ - Anders Bylund" - amazon.com on Geoff Colvin
http://www.amazon.com/Talent-Overrated-Separates-World-Class-Performers/dp/1591842948/ref=pd_sim_b_41
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[Quote No.36468] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Never mistake knowledge for wisdom: The first helps you make a living; the second helps you make a life." - Sandra Carny

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[Quote No.36476] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Action without study [learning] is fatal. Study [learning] without action is futile." - Mary Beard

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[Quote No.36500] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Be aware that media is often biased and sometimes outright lies in support of political agendas as the following article details:] ...I'm pondering the 'news' story that surfaced yesterday (1/7/11) alleging that Col Gaddafi said, '[that] Libya would target European "homes, offices, families" unless Nato stopped its campaign.' - 'Libya: Muammar Gaddafi threatens Europe', BBC 1 July 2011. This struck me as odd and not a little convenient, so I dug a little deeper and came up with the original Reuters story: 'TRIPOLI, July 1 (Reuters) - Muammar Gaddafi delivered an address by telephone to thousands of supporters who gathered in Tripoli's Green Square on Friday, vowing to stay on and warning the NATO-led alliance to stop its air war or face "catastrophe." "We advise you to retreat before you face a catastrophe," Gaddafi told the crowd of supporters who waved green flags and posters of the Libyan leader, whose soldiers are fighting a war against NATO-backed rebels seeking his overthrow.' -- 'Defiant Gaddafi warns NATO of "catastrophe", Reuters, 1 July 2011. Then this story appeared on Information Clearing House titled 'Qaddafi Did NOT Threaten Attacks on Europe'. As we have seen many times before, it's all down as to how it's translated: 'Gaddafi is challenging Sarkozy, Cameron and Obama to switch on their TV and watch the crowd. He is saying that they will find out that they are delusional because they entered a war [with Libya] which they will never win, he also says if you continue targeting our houses we can do the same because Europe is not far away but he said lets not do this.' (ibid) Predictably, the bent story now embraces the planet, justifying the rationale for 'taking out mad dog Gaddafi'. A perfect example of how the state/corporate media stranglehold on reality functions. Even RT [Russia Today] has fallen for the propaganda repeating verbatim the allegations made in the BBC piece. By the time (if ever) the misrepresentation is addressed, it will be too late. A replay of Saddam's [Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's] none existent WMD [Weapons of Mass Destruction, which was used as the rationale for the United Nations to allow the invasion of Iraqi that led to regime change and his trial and execution]." - William Bowles
[http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article29034.html ]
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[Quote No.36508] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men [women] and things can not be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one’s lifetime. [Travel is therefore important for intellectual, emotional, social and spiritual growth.]" - Mark Twain
Quote from his classic book, 'Innocents Abroad'.
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[Quote No.36527] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Anyone who has never made a mistake has never tried anything new [and in the long run their rate of learning and therefore their success will not keep up with the experimenter who is not afraid to continually try something new]." - Albert Einstein
Famous physicist
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[Quote No.36560] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The point of the memory techniques described in [the ancient text book] ‘Rhetorica ad Herennium’ is to take the kinds of memories our brains aren’t that good at holding onto and transform them into the kinds of memories our brains were built for. It advises creating memorable images [with your imagination]... the funnier, lewder and more bizarre, the better. [Because...] ‘When we see in everyday life things that are petty, ordinary and banal, we generally fail to remember them. ...But if we see or hear [or vividly imagine] something exceptionally base, dishonorable, extraordinary, great, unbelievable or laughable, that we are likely to remember it for a long time.' " - Joshua Foer
Journalist at the ‘New York Times’
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[Quote No.36561] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The Three Stages of Acquiring A New Skill: In the 1960s, the psychologists Paul Fitts and Michael Posner tried to answer this question [of improving your memory] by describing the three stages of acquiring a new skill. During the first phase, known as the cognitive phase, we intellectualize the task and discover new strategies to accomplish it more proficiently. During the second, the associative phase, we concentrate less, making fewer major errors, and become more efficient. Finally we reach what Fitts and Posner called the autonomous phase, when we’re as good as we need to be at the task and we basically run on autopilot. Most of the time that’s a good thing. The less we have to focus on the repetitive tasks of everyday life, the more we can concentrate on the stuff that really matters. You can actually see this phase shift take place in functional M.R.I.’s of subjects as they learn new tasks: the parts of the brain involved in conscious reasoning become less active, and other parts of the brain take over. You could call it the O.K. plateau. [Once people reach this level why do some go on to be exceptional?] They’ve found that top achievers typically follow the same general pattern [when trying to continue to improve their skills]. They develop strategies for keeping out of the autonomous stage by doing three things: focusing on their technique, staying goal-oriented and getting immediate feedback on their performance." - Joshua Foer
Journalist at the ‘New York Times’
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[Quote No.36589] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The Sceptics’ main teaching was that nothing could be accepted with certainty, conclusions of various degrees of probability could be formed, and these supplied a guide to conduct." - Nicholas Taleb
‘Fooled by Randomness’, 2001 - P184.
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[Quote No.36597] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"While one person hesitates because he feels inferior, the other is busy making mistakes and becoming superior." - Anon

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[Quote No.36651] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Where is the wisdom we have lost in knowledge? Where is the knowledge we have lost in information?" - T.S. Eliot
(1888-1965), poet.
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[Quote No.36664] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Responsibility for learning belongs to the student, regardless of age." - Robert Martin

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[Quote No.36675] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Rather than love, than money, than fame, give me truth. " - Henry David Thoreau

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[Quote No.36676] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Education is a progressive discovery of our ignorance." - Will Durant
(1885 – 1981), a prolific American writer, historian, and philosopher.
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[Quote No.36700] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The fool thinks himself to be wise, but the wise man knows himself to be a fool." - William Shakespeare
English Playwright. From his play, 'Measure For Measure'.
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[Quote No.36708] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"We live in the present, we dream of the future and we learn eternal truths from the past." - Madame Chiang Kai-Shek

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[Quote No.36721] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"An expert is someone who knows some of the worst mistakes, which can be made, in a very narrow field." - Niels Bohr
Famous physicist.
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[Quote No.36723] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Without education, you're not going anywhere in this world." - Malcolm X

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[Quote No.36755] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Learn the critical things in life before you need them. Don't wait and] ...learn geology the morning after the earthquake." - Ralph Waldo Emerson

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[Quote No.36758] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"How many things served us but yesterday as articles of faith, which today we deem but fables?" - Michel Eyquem De Montaigne

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[Quote No.36759] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The wise are instructed by reason, average minds by experience, the stupid by necessity and the brute by instinct." - Marcus T. Cicero

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[Quote No.36761] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Failure to prepare is preparing to fail!" - John Wooden

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[Quote No.36769] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects!" - Will Rogers

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[Quote No.36801] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Some wisdom you must learn from one who's wise." - Euripides

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[Quote No.36808] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The farther backward [into history] you can look, the farther forward [into the future] you are likely to see." - Winston Churchill

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[Quote No.36809] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Humanity is generally intellectually lazy.] Appearance rules the world. [Perception, rather than investigation and reason, is 'reality'.]" - Johann Friedrich Von Schiller

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[Quote No.36817] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Unless we remember we cannot understand." - Edward M. Forster

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[Quote No.36828] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"The past is really almost as much a work of the imagination as the [present and the] future." - Jessamyn West
(1902 - 1984)
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[Quote No.36840] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Time is of no account with great thoughts [and quotes], which are as fresh today as when they first passed through their authors' minds ages ago." - Samuel Smiles

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[Quote No.36844] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Quotation is the highest compliment you can pay to an author." - Samuel Johnson
(1709 - 1784), English author, famous for compiling a vast English dictionary. It quoted respected authors to show the words in use.
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[Quote No.36851] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"A good book is the precious life-blood of a master-spirit, embalmed and treasured up on purpose to [offer insight and inspiration to] a life beyond life!" - John Milton
(1608 - 1674), English poet.
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[Quote No.36853] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"But words are things, and a small drop of ink, falling like dew, upon a thought, produces that which makes thousands, perhaps millions, think!" - George Gordon Byron
(1788 – 1824), English poet.
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[Quote No.36858] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Life itself is a quotation." - Jorge Luis Borges
(1899 – 1986), Argentine writer, essayist and poet.
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[Quote No.36859] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested!" - Francis Bacon
(1561 -1626), English philosopher, lawyer, and author.
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[Quote No.36861] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Man's ...search for wisdom and truth, is a love story." - Iris Murdoch
(1919 - 1999)
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[Quote No.36868] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Every time man makes a new experiment he always learns more. He cannot learn less." - R. Buckminster Fuller
(1895 - 1983).
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[Quote No.36888] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"If we want truth to live in us, we must live in it." - Frithjof Schuon

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[Quote No.36896] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Without education, we are in a horrible and deadly danger of taking [some misguided but] educated people seriously." - G. K. Chesterton

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[Quote No.36901] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Too many people tend to change only when they feel the heat (of a bad personal experience), rather than because they see the light (from observing someone else's bad experience)." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.36919] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Aano bhadra krtavo yantu vishwatah.[Sanskrit for 'Let noble thoughts come to me from all directions (peoples-cultures and times-histories)']" - Rigveda [Hindu]
This is an ancient Indian, sacred collection of Vedic Sanskrit hymns. The word in sanskrit means rig 'praise, verse' and veda 'knowledge'. It is counted among the four canonical sacred texts of Hinduism known as the Vedas. It is one of the oldest extant texts in any Indo-European language, being composed in the north-western region of the Indian subcontinent, roughly between 1700–1100 BC (the early Vedic period).
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[Quote No.36928] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"He to whom the present is the only thing that is present, knows nothing of the age in which he lives." - Oscar Wilde

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[Quote No.36941] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"In a time of drastic change it is the learners who inherit the future. The learned [who stop learning] usually find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists." - Eric Hoffer

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[Quote No.36943] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"A proverb is much matter distilled into few words." - R. Buckminster Fuller

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[Quote No.36944] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Quality questions create a quality life. Successful people ask better questions, and as a result, they get better answers. [Better answers allow more imaginative plans which therefore succeed more often, thereby creating a better life.]" - Anthony Robbins

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[Quote No.36947] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"All great truths begin as blasphemies." - George Bernard Shaw
(1856 - 1950)
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[Quote No.36948] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"If you have an apple and I have an apple and we exchange these apples then you and I will still each have one apple. But if you have an idea and I have an idea and we exchange these ideas, then each of us will have two ideas." - George Bernard Shaw
(1856 - 1950)
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[Quote No.36949] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"A man learns to skate by staggering about and making a fool of himself; indeed, he progresses in all things by making a fool of himself." - George Bernard Shaw
(1856 - 1950)
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