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  Quotations - Leadership  
[Quote No.54425] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story – with a message about persisting past criticism, disappointment, rejection, years of unrewarded effort, physical danger and the challenges of leadership to eventually achieve success, even if the success is a little different from what was originally imagined:-] 'Christopher Columbus' - We think the world has changed and that somehow the experiences of today's entrepreneurs are different than yesterday's. Is it really different? ...let's step back and take a look at Columbus through the eyes of today's entrepreneurs and start-ups. Columbus was an explorer and an adventurer, but today he would simply be called an entrepreneur.

Early Background:
Christopher Columbus was born around 1451 to a father, who worked in the textile industry, and was of small means. Today's Perspective: Christopher Columbus was not well-connected and he had to build his professional network to achieve his goals. Certainly funding was not to be found among family and friends of his early childhood.

Professional Background:
Columbus spent his youth sailing on small vessels. In one of his writings, Columbus claims to have gone to the sea at the age of 10. Yet, a contradictory statement by the admiral has him becoming a sailor at 14. In the early 1470s, he served on a ship associated with the failed attempt to conquer Naples. However, during the same years of 1470-1473 he can be found in the family weaving business. In 1476, he sailed on a convoy attacked by a privateer - two of the four ships escaped. His voyages continued into northern Europe. In 1479, Columbus settled in Portugal, where he worked with his brother as a mapmaker. Today's Perspective: Columbus had some experience in his industry. His resume was spotty. Nothing stands out or is remarkable at this point. Being part of some failed voyages was not optimal for asking investors for funding in later years.

Personal Background:
In 1478, he married a lady of some rank, Felipa Moniz de Perestrello, daughter of Bartholomew Perestrello, a captain in the service of Prince Henry the Navigator, and also cousin of the archbishop of Lisbon. Today's Perspective: Now here's some potential to get family and friends as investors, or at the very least, some introductions and connections to those institutional investors (monarchs) and the super angels (noblemen).

Identifying the Problem:
In 1453, the Ottoman Turks took over the land-based trade routes to Asia, which made travel through the region dangerous. Thus, the urgent need to discover a new sea route to reach India and China - vital sources of silk, spices and other products. Today's Perspective: The political winds changed, causing profits to be curtailed from a sole source supplier with no other geographic location able to provide suitable replacements. There we have it: customers desperately seeking a solution to an urgent problem. Surely they tried other solutions, but apparently none were adequate. And where there is profit, there is progress, and the greater the profit, the greater the progress. Here the investors were trying to solve a big problem.

The Product Concept:
How Columbus arrived at his idea is not known, and the details are disputed. It is said while working as a mapmaker, he came in contact with many mariners. There were books written about previous explorations to the east. He corresponded with some of the thought leaders of the day concerning his proposal. Today's Perspective: Columbus had a spark. He didn't take a half-baked idea directly to the investors. He spent some time researching it, discussing it with current day experts - the mariners that required maps, and corresponding with the thinkers of the day. He refined his proposal. Columbus' investment community was rather small. There were only a few that could afford to fund him, likewise there simply aren't a huge number of venture capitalists today and word gets around quickly.

Rejection:
In 1485, Columbus presented his plans to the King of Portugal. He proposed the king provide three ships and grant Columbus one year to search for a route to Asia. The king submitted the proposal to his experts, who rejected it. In their opinion, Columbus' proposed route of 2,400 miles was far too short. Although the king's council was negative, the king favored Columbus' proposal. The king brought the proposal to the bishop of Ceuta, who suggested the plan be carried out in secret and without its author's knowledge. A ship was dispatched, but it returned shortly after beginning its voyage as the sailors lost heart and refused to venture far. Today's Perspective: It would be a miracle today if an unknown and unproven entrepreneur could secure major funding from the first investor meeting. The king did exactly what the venture capitalists and angel investors do today; they validate the technical aspects of the proposal through their network of experts in many fields. In Columbus' case, the experts weighed in with serious concerns about the technical merits of his proposal - and rightly so. Columbus' inexperience in sailing made him underestimate the circumference of the earth. As to the secret voyage, well ... that's when investors like the idea, but don't like the entrepreneur. It's when investors feel they want to appoint a more suitable management team. In Columbus' case, the investors didn't feel he would be adding much to the execution phase.

Investors' Motives:
In 1488, Columbus approached the King of Portugal once again and was rejected. Henry the Navigator had revived an old proposal for Portugal to pursue a sea route around the southern tip of Africa. In 1487, the Portuguese mariner Bartholomeu Dias set sail to round the Horn of Africa. Shortly after Columbus' second meeting, Dias successfully returned and Portugal was no longer interested in seeking a westward sea route to Asia. Today's Perspective: The investors liked Columbus' proposal, they tried it, but it didn't work. So they sought a solution elsewhere and chose to fund a solution that was proposed by a successful and proven mariner - Prince Henry the Navigator. The entrepreneur is never the only proposal being presented to the investor; there will be many. Once Portugal had solved its problem, it was time to seek funding elsewhere, perhaps with a competitor.

Persistence and Searching Harder for an Investor:
Columbus had difficulty finding funding. His proposals were rejected by the various European monarchs. While presenting his proposal to the monarchs, he continued to meet with noblemen, seeking their advice and securing connections. Columbus persisted as the royal experts debated his proposal and subsequently denied its merits. Columbus often fell into deep despair. When he presented his proposal to Ferdinand and Isabella, it received the same rejection. One appraoch was poorly timed, as the Spanish were in the middle of a struggle that resulted in the conquest of the Granada Moors. However, the Spanish monarchs offered him an annual allowance and provided him food and lodging at no cost in all cities and towns under their control, just to keep him from taking his proposal to someone else. Queen Isabella rejected Columbus' plan three times before changing her mind. Columbus' terms - the position of Admiral, governorship for him and his descendants of discovered lands, and ten percent of the profits for all trips made by Spain to the new lands, for all time. Finally in 1492, the monarchs approved his proposal. In August, his expedition departed and arrived in America on October 12. Columbus stumbled upon America. He returned the next year and presented his findings to the monarchs, and Spain entered a Golden Age. Today's Perspective: Persistence matters a great deal in the start-up game. Unless you've got a spectacular track record, funding won't happen quickly - not in a week, not in a month. Entrepreneurs have to persist for some time and there will be those times when the entrepreneurs wonder why they are doing it. Cisco was rejected by 77 VC's before securing funding and it was near a 1,000 rejections for Colonel Sanders of KFC. It takes a strong ego to survive that much rejection. Timing is everything in capital markets. If the entrepreneur is seeking any kind of outside funding, it is all somehow connected to the capital markets. In Columbus' case, it was the struggles between countries. The Spanish monarchs essentially put a no-shopping gag on Columbus - they paid him not to take his proposal elsewhere. This is green-mail. Once Portugal had a sea route around the Horn of Africa, Ferdinand and Isabella had to find a route to the East in order to keep their competitor from grabbing the lion share of the market. Hence, their sudden interest in Columbus and willingness to accept his terms. In today's terms, Columbus demanded to be CEO and locked in a succession plan for his children to be appointed CEO, he and his family were to receive 10% of corporate profits forever - equity was out of the question, but salary and profit sharing seemed acceptable to the monarchs. To have demanded those terms for the monarchs, Columbus must have been quite an ambitious man. Imagine the response a first-time entrepreneur, with no track record of success, would get from a VC today with those terms. The world is not so different today than 500 years ago. Technology advances as we further the improvements of previous generations, but how people behave and react has not changed at all.

" - Cynthia Kocialski
Cynthia Kocialski has founded three companies and has been actively involved in more than 25 hi-tech start-up. Cynthia has held various technical, marketing and management positions at IBM and Matrox Electronics. She is a graduate of the University of Rochester and the University of Virginia. She writes a blog at http://www.cynthiakocialski.com [Refer http://www.translationdirectory.com/articles/article2253.php ]
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[Quote No.54430] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[A true story – with a message about persisting past difficulties, even life-challenging health problems, to achieve success, whether starting a company or turning one around from failing to succeeding as in the following case:]

- Steve Jobs: The Return, 1997-2011 - Steve Jobs was not accustomed to boos, but there he was, on stage at the airy and decrepit Park Plaza Castle auditorium in Boston, absorbing a crescendo of unhappiness. It was 1997, the year Jobs replaced Gil Amelio and declared himself ‘interim CEO’ of Apple (AAPL), saying he was too busy with Pixar and family to take over permanently. At the annual Macworld Expo that August, Jobs told the long-suffering Apple faithful that there was still hope for the computer company but that it would first have to put aside its all-too-consuming fixation with its dominant rival, Microsoft (MSFT). ‘We are shepherding some of the great assets in the computer industry. If we want to move forward and see Apple healthy and prospering again, we have to let go of a few things,’ said Jobs, dressed in his trademark outfit of that era, a sweater vest and pleated slacks. Microsoft, he announced, was investing $150 million in Apple and making a promise to develop Microsoft Office software for the Macintosh for the next five years. Bill Gates popped up on a 100-foot screen, appearing pedantic and flaccid in contrast to Jobs’s swagger. ‘The era of setting this up as a competition between Apple and Microsoft is over as far as I’m concerned,’ Jobs said after Gates’s brief and awkward speech, trying to quell the disappointed audience, some of whom appeared to be in tears. The détente forged on that August day was, in retrospect, a cold calculation by Jobs that Apple did not need to win the old battle for the PC in order to prevail in a dawning war for digital media devices and the Internet. It was also the first bit of evidence that despite his professed ambivalence, Jobs was fully committing himself to an Apple turnaround. Colin Crawford, who ran Macworld in the 1990s along with publications such as MacWEEK, recalls asking Jobs back then why he wanted to return to the company he had founded. ‘He sort of looked at me quizzically and said that his and Apple’s DNA were completely intertwined,’ Crawford says. ‘He said that Apple’s brand was badly tarnished and that he intended to repolish it.’ It’s difficult to remember how far Apple had fallen. Just a few months away from bankruptcy, the company had a dwindling 4 percent share of the PC market and annual losses exceeding $1 billion. Three CEOs had come and gone in a decade; board members had tried to sell the company but found no takers. Two months after Apple’s deal with Microsoft, Michael Dell told a tech industry symposium that if he ran Apple, he’d ‘shut it down and give the money back to shareholders.’ Lucky for the shareholders that Jobs and not Dell (DELL) was at Apple’s helm. Apple’s market capitalization went from $3 billion at the start of 1997 [footnote 1] to $350 billion today—more than the valuation of Microsoft and Dell combined—making it the second most valuable company in the world. A single share, worth a little over $4 the day Dell spoke, is now worth nearly 100 times that. Much would be written about how Apple forever changed the way people communicate, entertain themselves, even the way they absorb information. Here’s a simpler way to sum up Apple’s influence, in four words: iMac, iPod, iPhone, iPad. Jobs recognized that an industry dominated by Microsoft and Intel would not adapt smoothly in the era of personal media and communication devices. Those companies could not move quickly while in lockstep with their multiple partners in hardware and retail, and Jobs bet that they would not innovate rapidly or radically enough, since their profits relied on the preservation of an old regime. He also understood that in the fluid and rapidly evolving technology business—where new technologies are constantly disrupting the established winners—there was a chance to reshuffle the deck in his favor. What Apple removed from technology products, Jobs liked to say, was just as important as what it added. He banished elements like separate numerical keypads, floppy disk drives, and computer mice with two buttons. With the help of Apple’s chief designer, a Brit named Jonathan Ive [footnote 2], he ushered in candy colors, gleaming metals with rounded edges, and cone-shaped Wi-Fi base stations. Apple’s commitment to industrial design was infectious. ‘His legacy of making design a strategic tool cannot be underestimated,’ says Robert Brunner, a former Apple designer and now the CEO of the firm Ammunition Group. ‘Company after company comes in the door here, and in every conversation Apple is discussed. They want to do it like Apple. Steve raised the bar not just for the industry but for the world.’ Cool products demanded cool pitches. When Jobs rejoined Apple, it had more than a dozen ad agencies. He fired them all except Chiat/Day, which had created Apple’s famous ‘Big Brother’ commercial for the 1984 Super Bowl. The 1997 ‘Think Different’ campaign riffed with grammatical apathy off an old IBM slogan, ‘Think.’ Jobs himself selected the famous figures who appeared in the ads, including Albert Einstein, Martin Luther King Jr., Frank Lloyd Wright, John Lennon, and his personal hero, Bob Dylan. He also briefly considered recording the voice-over himself (‘Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels…’) before yielding to actor Richard Dreyfuss. For Jobs it was a deeply personal effort and a way to remind Apple’s employees, its customers, and perhaps himself what the company stood for. ‘You can’t talk about profit, you have to talk about emotional experiences,’ he explained. Jobs said this at a time when other PC firms believed computer buyers wanted boxy beige towers that sat under desks and connected to separate displays on top. Acting on instinct, Jobs bet that the new, more mainstream wave of PC buyers could be attracted to something else. So along came the iMac [footnote 3], a heavy, bulbous, all-in-one computer whose translucent casing came in five flashy colors. Reporters and consumers loved the iMac [footnote 4], and by 2000 Apple’s finances had recovered. ‘We’re in such a unique position,’ Jobs told BusinessWeek that year, extolling the benefits of controlling both the hardware and software elements of the personal computer. ‘If we do our jobs right, no one else should be able to do what we can do. We should be in an incredible place as this convergence of computing and communications explodes in the next few years. I think it’s ours to lose.’ Not every battle was won. The Power Mac G4 Cube—a minimalist, miniaturized computer, encased in plastic with no display, keyboard, or mouse—flopped. But the Cube showed how to join ever increasing processing power with an aesthetic of clean surfaces and ease of use, a marriage that turned out much happier for the iPod, the cigarette-pack-size digital music player made of white polycarbonate introduced in October 2001. There were other MP3 players on the market, most of them smaller and cheaper. Even at an original price of $399, the visual distinctiveness of the iPod and the way it worked seamlessly with its iTunes music service, made it not just a cool product but an object of desire. The iPod helped to propagate and commercialize the revolution in digital media first fomented by Internet file-sharing services such as Napster. To Jobs, though, it was also something else: the answer to Apple’s existential crisis. In a world dominated by Microsoft, where did Apple fit? It turned out that a company’s design talents, software prowess, and ability to exploit cheap but high-quality manufacturing in Asia could produce gorgeous and accessible consumer electronics. ‘If there was ever a product that catalyzed Apple’s reason for being, it’s this,’ Jobs said in the book The Perfect Thing by Steven Levy. ‘Because it combines Apple’s incredible technology base with Apple’s legendary ease of use with Apple’s awesome design. Those things come together and it’s like, that’s what we do. So if anybody is ever wondering, why is Apple on the Earth, I would hold this up as a good example.’ He called what happened next the ‘iPod halo effect.’ Millions of people bought iPods and entered the Apple tent for the first time. They became more willing to consider an iMac, or to walk into one of Apple’s proliferating stores—a go-it-alone retail strategy that Jobs unveiled in 2001 with the help of a former Target (TGT) executive named Ron Johnson. Most pundits (including some at BusinessWeek) thought the stores were foolhardy. The move alienated existing Mac dealers and seemed like a lavish waste of resources to showcase a limited product line. But it allowed the company to preside over its own sales pitch and establish customer service hubs (brilliantly called Genius Bars) at a time when all these new customers needed their hands held as they waded into the digital waters. Apple would not have been so insanely successful if Jobs also did not have a thick streak of the enforcer in him. The music labels succumbed, offering their songs for 99¢ over iTunes and, it turns out, cannibalizing their sales of albums, the most profitable part of their business. Then Jobs hammered away at the television networks and movie studios, adding TV shows and then movies to iTunes in 2006. His sense of entitlement was tested when federal regulators looked into Apple’s questionable backdating of options to top executives, which had increased the value of stock grants. Jobs would rail privately to journalists that he had done nothing wrong. The Securities and Exchange Commission ultimately charged two former executives of the company, and Apple promptly settled. ‘Jobs was one of these CEOs who ran the company like he wanted to. He believed he knew more about it than anyone else, and he probably did,’ said Arthur Levitt, a former chairman of the SEC. ‘He’s among the best CEOs I’ve ever known, in spite of his irreverence, irascibility, and ego [footnote 5].’ There appeared a cloud in all this blue sky that would grow and darken. In a regularly scheduled Monday morning meeting in late 2003, Jobs gathered his management team into the fourth-floor boardroom in Building One of Apple’s headquarters in Cupertino and closed the door. Other executives also attended these meetings, but on this day, Jobs asked them not to come. He then invited everyone to move in closer, according to one participant, and told them that he had a rare but operable form of pancreatic cancer. ‘I’m going to need to lean on you guys for help,’ he said. Some executives cried. The following year, after he had tried out a special diet to beat the cancer, Jobs had surgery, and his illness was publicly announced. So began Jobs’s eight-year struggle, one that pitted a man’s desire to keep details of his illness private against a company’s duty to keep shareholders informed. Almost to the end, the man won out, with the company telling the public of developments long after they happened. It would be easy to explain this behavior as an arrogant desire to protect the stock price or an obsession with personal privacy. Above all else, though, Jobs was disciplined about what he revealed to customers and competitors. He likely thought news of his health was drawing attention away from his own finely crafted narrative for Apple. Colleagues say Jobs continued to work harder than ever, even after his illness worsened. In his commencement address to Stanford’s graduating class in 2005, he said the crisis had convinced him to place bolder bets. ‘Remembering that I’ll be dead soon is the most important tool I’ve ever encountered to help me make the big choices in life,’ he said. ‘Because almost everything—all external expectations, all pride, all fear of embarrassment or failure—these things just fall away in the face of death, leaving only what is truly important. Remembering that you are going to die is the best way I know to avoid the trap of thinking you have something to lose.’ Improbably, his greatest triumphs were still ahead. After Apple had experimented for years with the idea of building its own cell phones and even operating its own wireless network, Jobs finally convinced AT&T (T) to subordinate its brand to Apple’s in exchange for exclusive rights to sell an Apple phone to U.S. buyers. ‘This is a day I’ve been looking forward to for two and a half years,’ Jobs said, introducing the iPhone in San Francisco in January 2007. ‘Every once in a while a revolutionary product comes along that changes everything.’ How boastful, how self-serving—and how right on the money. Apple exec Bud Tribble memorably dubbed Jobs’s charismatic ability to convince himself and others of almost anything ‘the reality distortion field.’ With the iPhone and so much else, the field won. The device’s large display and touchscreen, and its seamless connection to the App Store, which became home to thousands of innovative programs for mobile phones, would alter the topography of the industry and propel Apple into its golden age. By the end of 2010, Apple had sold 129 million iPhones, which accounted for about 40 percent of its revenue. And yet there was that cloud. After Bloomberg mistakenly released an unfinished draft of a Jobs obit in August 2008, Jobs joked publicly about his health, riffing off Mark Twain’s line that rumors of his death were greatly exaggerated. In January 2009, Jobs announced that a hormone imbalance was responsible for the noticeable drop in his weight and began a five-month medical leave, handing control of the company to Tim Cook, the chief operating officer. He told only a few colleagues and board members about the gravity of his condition. In March he underwent a liver transplant operation at Methodist University Hospital in Memphis, a fact not reported by the Wall Street Journal until two months later, after the markets had closed for the week. That spring, Apple board member Jerry York told the Journal that Jobs’s secrecy over the issue ‘disgusted him,’ and he believed that Apple should have been more open with shareholders about his condition. Jobs obviously disagreed. The man who wanted to control every element of Apple’s performance also wanted to control every detail about how his own situation was portrayed. At an event in San Francisco, he made an offhand quip to a CNBC reporter that Apple investors would like to see him gain weight. CNBC reported the remark on-air and on its website, which Jobs learned about just as another journalist entered a private room to interview him. ‘Fix it,’ he screamed to his public-relations chief, who scurried outside to demand that CNBC remove the report from the Web. (It did.) Despite his reputation for secrecy, Jobs had personal relationships with many members of the press and tried to dictate perceptions of the company. Apple, he liked to joke, was a ‘ship that leaked from the top,’ and calls to reporters to manipulate a story often seemed part of his nightly routine. ‘Hi, this is Steve Jobs,’ you could expect to hear when you picked up the phone. In one instance, Jobs called the editor of a news magazine to complain about a story that had been posted on its website, claiming the lead was inaccurate and off-the-record comments about a rival company had been included. Down came the story, and hours later back up went the fixed version. In early 2010 [footnote 6] a new rival was obsessing Jobs: Google (GOOG). Its CEO at the time, Eric Schmidt, had sat on Apple’s board for two years, and Jobs felt he had forged personal friendships with founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin, with whom he often took long walks. Now the search giant was challenging Apple in the mobile phone business with its Android operating system, which was powering a new wave of touchscreen handsets that mimicked the iPhone. Jobs did not see this as a case of two companies competing. He considered it a personal betrayal. Of course Jobs, like most artists, also borrowed liberally from the work of others. People credit him as an inventor akin to Edison, but his real genius was seizing upon existing concepts, simplifying and perfecting them, and then putting them forward at exactly the right moment. The iPad was perhaps the best example. Tablets running Microsoft software debuted in 2000 and went nowhere; they were really stripped-down PCs, complex and difficult to use. For years Apple’s marketing chief, Phil Schiller, and John Couch, its vice-president of education, wanted Apple to enter the tablet market, too, but Jobs never saw an approach he liked. The iPhone changed his mind. Its simplified operating system and multitouch technology, derived from a company called FingerWorks that Apple acquired in 2005, would be perfect for a tablet. The iPad was ready by late 2009. Apple gave a few key developers early access, but in typical fashion swore them to secrecy and chained the devices to desks in windowless rooms. They were really nothing like the old Microsoft tablets. ‘The real insight was not shrinking the Mac, but growing the iPhone,’ said Bob Borchers, a former senior director of marketing at Apple. The company introduced the device in January 2010 and sold more than 29 million tablets in the next year and a half. Apple’s new surge seemed to embolden him. He doubled down both on his go-it-alone vision and his efforts to control the Apple narrative in the press. The iPhone and iPad did not run websites that used Adobe’s flash video format because Jobs thought it performed poorly on mobile phones and drained the battery. Users were directed to use Apple-sold apps instead. When the iPhone 4 was released that summer and many users complained of losing their signal when they gripped its base, Jobs replied to one customer by e-mail and told him to ‘just avoid holding it that way.’ Apple later addressed the problem more sensitively by offering a software fix and by giving users a free case. Jobs could control everything but his health, and by the summer of 2011, his condition left him no choice but to step down. ‘I have always said if there ever came a day when I could no longer meet my duties and expectations as Apple’s CEO, I would be the first to let you know. Unfortunately, that day has come,’ he said in a resignation letter on Aug. 24, handing over control of Apple to Tim Cook but retaining the title of executive chairman. ‘I look forward to watching and contributing to its success in a new role.’ In 15 years, Jobs had taken a floundering company that once seemed unlikely to grow past its painful adolescence and turned it into one of the most influential and valuable corporations in the world. He had changed culture, commerce, and the very relationship that people have with technology. The moving tributes that flowed in after his death—on Twitter and Facebook, at Apple Stores [footnote 7], and in statements from public leaders—spoke to his outsized impact. Rumors about Jobs’s health had been buzzing around Silicon Valley all year, but anyone who knew him and read that resignation letter understood the end was near. He had been so good at distorting reality, so good at bending everyone—competitors, consumers, the press, and especially himself—to see the world his way. By relinquishing control, Jobs acknowledged that he had finally met the one force he could not charm or bully or out-think: his own mortality.

Footnotes:
1. Apple’s revenue in 1997: $7.1 billion
2. Jony Ive, hired by Apple in 1992, holds more than 300 patents.
3. The iMac was the first Apple product to use the ‘i’ prefix.
4. The early iMac color spectrum included lime, strawberry, blueberry, grape, and tangerine.
5. Steve Jobs’s annual salary since rejoining Apple in 1997: $1
6. Apple’s revenue in 2010: $65.2 billion
7. At the end of Q2, Apple had 327 stores worldwide. The company plans to open 40 more in fiscal 2011.

" - Brad Stone
Senior writer for ‘Bloomberg Businessweek’ in San Francisco. He is the author of ‘The Everything Store: Jeff Bezos and the Age of Amazon’. October 06, 2011 [http://www.bloomberg.com/bw/magazine/the-return-19972011-10062011.html ]
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[Quote No.54444] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"An enterprising person is one who comes across a pile of scrap metal and sees the making of a wonderful sculpture. An enterprising person is one who drives through an old decrepit part of town and sees a new housing development. An enterprising person is one who sees opportunity in all areas of life. To be enterprising is to keep your eyes open and your mind active. It’s to be skilled enough, confident enough, creative enough and disciplined enough to seize opportunities that present themselves... regardless of the economy. A person with an enterprising attitude says, 'Find out what you can before action is taken.' Do your homework. Do the research. Be prepared. Be resourceful. Do all you can in preparation of what’s to come. Enterprising people always see the future in the present. Enterprising people always find a way to take advantage of a situation, not be burdened by it. And enterprising people aren’t lazy. They don’t wait for opportunities to come to them, they go after the opportunities. Enterprise means always finding a way to keep yourself actively working toward your ambition. Enterprise is two things. The first is creativity. You need creativity to see what’s out there and to shape it to your advantage. You need creativity to look at the world a little differently. You need creativity to take a different approach, to be different. What goes hand-in-hand with the creativity of enterprise is the second requirement: the courage to be creative. You need courage to see things differently, courage to go against the crowd, courage to take a different approach, courage to stand alone if you have to, courage to choose activity over inactivity. And lastly, being enterprising doesn’t just relate to the ability to make money. Being enterprising also means feeling good enough about yourself, having enough self worth to want to seek advantages and opportunities that will make a difference in your future. And by doing so you will increase your confidence, your courage, your creativity and your self-worth, your enterprising nature." - Jim Rohn
Business consultant, speaker and successful businessman.
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[Quote No.54480] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"A leader tries to bring out the best in themselves and those they lead, without using force or fraud." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.54488] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The higher we are placed, the more humbly we should walk." - Cicero
philosopher
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[Quote No.54492] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Everyone wants to be appreciated. So if you appreciate someone, don't keep it a secret!" - Mary Kay Ash

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[Quote No.54501] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"When someone is made the head of an office in the Ogilvy & Mather chain, I send him a Matrioshka doll from Gorky. If he has the curiosity to open it, and keep opening it until he comes to the inside of the smallest doll, he finds this message: If each of us hires people who are smaller than we are, we shall become a company of dwarfs. But if each of us hires people who are bigger than we are, we shall become a company of giants." - David Ogilvy

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[Quote No.54513] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The real test of business greatness is in giving opportunity to others." - Charles M. Schwab
(1862 - 1939)
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[Quote No.54521] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"As a leader... I have always endeavored to listen to what each and every person in a discussion had to say before venturing my own opinion. Oftentimes, my own opinion will simply represent a consensus of what I heard in the discussion. I always remember the axiom: a leader is like a shepherd. He stays behind the flock, letting the most nimble go out ahead, whereupon the others follow, not realizing that all along they are being directed from behind." - Nelson Mandela

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[Quote No.54526] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"One only gets to the top rung of the ladder by steadily climbing up one at a time, and suddenly all sorts of powers, all sorts of abilities which you thought never belonged to you -- suddenly become within your own possibility and you think, 'Well, I'll have a go, too.'" - Margaret Thatcher
British Prime Minister
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[Quote No.54562] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Advice on developing good relations and resolving conflict, by rewarding desired behaviour and ignoring undesirable behaviour:] If your friend makes a severe remark, either leave it unnoticed, or make your reply distinctly less severe and if he makes a friendly remark, tending towards 'making up' the little difference that has arisen between you, let your reply be distinctly more friendly!" - Lewis Carroll

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[Quote No.54634] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The roots of all goodness lie in the soil of appreciation for goodness." - Dalai Lama

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[Quote No.54670] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Sometimes it’s easier to criticize than praise. But it’s praise that fuels an organizations progress." - Bill Parcells

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[Quote No.54675] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The price of success is to bear the criticism of envy." - Denis Waitley

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[Quote No.54676] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The stretch of the limousine usually is inversely proportional to the self-esteem of the person riding in it." - Denis Waitley

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[Quote No.54714] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"When I say artist I mean the one who is building things ... some with a brush – some with a shovel – some choose a pen." - Jackson Pollock

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[Quote No.54727] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"It's easy to have faith in people who have already proved themselves. It's much tougher to believe in people before they have proved themselves. But that is the key to motivating people to reach their potential." - John Maxwell
writer and motivational speaker
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[Quote No.54768] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Good, better, best. Never let it rest until your good is better and your better is best." - Saying

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[Quote No.54769] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Leadership is the challenge to be something more than average." - Jim Rohn

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[Quote No.54774] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"My best friend [and the best leader] is the one who brings out the best in me." - Henry Ford

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[Quote No.54842] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Nothing recedes like success." - Walter Winchell

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[Quote No.54918] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Remember the importance of humility - and 'Pride cometh before a fall' - or else...] Success has made failures of many men." - Cindy Adams

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[Quote No.54919] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Remember the importance of humility because...] Nothing recedes like success." - Walter Winchell

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[Quote No.54924] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Never deprive someone of hope -- it may be all they have!" - Anonymous

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[Quote No.54933] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"What counts is the way power is used – whether with swagger and contempt, or with prudence, discipline and magnanimity. What counts is the purpose for which power is used – whether for aggrandizement or for liberation. 'It is excellent,' Shakespeare said, 'to have a giant's strength; but it is tyrannous to use it like a giant!' " - John F. Kennedy
US President
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[Quote No.54934] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Art stands on the shoulders of craft, which means that to get to the art you must master the craft. If you want to write, practice writing. Practice it for hours a day, not to come up with a story you can publish, but because you long to learn how to write well, because there is something that you alone can say. Write the story, learn from it, put it away, write another story." - Ann Patchett
Novelist. Quote from her book, 'This Is the Story of a Happy Marriage'. [Refer http://www.brainpickings.org/2015/04/27/ann-patchett-on-writing/ ]
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[Quote No.54942] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Often] You cannot swim for new horizons until you have courage to lose sight of the shore." - William Faulkner

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[Quote No.54965] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Politeness and civility are the best capital ever invested!" - P.T. Barnum

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[Quote No.54970] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Let him who would move the world first move himself." - Socrates

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[Quote No.54980] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The greatest ability in business is to get along with others and influence their actions." - John Hancock

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[Quote No.54984] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Character is formed, not by laws, commands, and decrees, but by quiet influence, unconscious suggestion and personal guidance!" - Marion Burton

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[Quote No.54986] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The truly great man [or woman] is he [or she] who would master no one [by force or deception, but only by free, informed choice and persuasion], and who would be mastered by none!" - Kahlil Gibran

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[Quote No.55006] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"[Vocation and career:] The history of the world shows us that men are not to be counted by their numbers, but by the fire and vigour of their passions." - Sydney Smith
(1771 - 1845)
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[Quote No.55016] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"You're only as good as the people you hire." - Ray Kroc

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[Quote No.55018] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"It is only as we develop others that we permanently succeed." - Harvey Firestone

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[Quote No.55042] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"You are capable of more than you know. Choose a goal that seems right for you and strive to be the best, however hard the path. Aim high. Behave honorably. Prepare to be alone at times, and to endure failure. Persist! The world needs all you can give." - E. O. Wilson

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[Quote No.55044] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Without a trace of irony I can say I have been blessed with brilliant enemies. I owe them a great debt, because they redoubled my energies and drove me in new directions." - E. O. Wilson

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[Quote No.55058] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"I think I've done the best I could have done. But I keep wanting to play better, go further. There are so many sounds I still want to make, so many things I haven't yet done. When I was younger I thought maybe I'd reached that peak. But I'm 86 now, and if I make it through to next month, I'll be 87. And now I know it can never be perfect, it can never be exactly what it should be, so you got to keep going further, getting better." - Riley (B.B.) King

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[Quote No.55092] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Perfection is not attainable, but if we chase perfection, we can catch excellence." - Vince Lombardi
football coach
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[Quote No.55094] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Excellence means when a man or woman asks of himself more than others do." - Jose Ortega y Gasset
philosopher and essayist
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[Quote No.55126] Need Area: Work > Leadership
""Life is too short to spend your precious time trying to convince a person who wants to live in gloom and doom otherwise. Give lifting that person your best shot, but don't hang around long enough for his or her bad attitude to pull you down. Instead, surround yourself with optimistic people." - Zig Ziglar

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[Quote No.55129] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The last thing I want people to believe is that I don't care about the shareholder. But I happen to believe that in order to reward the shareholder in the long term, you have to please your customers and workers." - Jim Sinegal
Costco CEO, who owned 3.2 million shares of Costco at the time he said this.
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[Quote No.55208] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"More Flies are taken with a Drop of Honey than a Tun of Vinegar." - Thomas Fuller, M. D.
(1654 - 1734)
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[Quote No.55260] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The best of all governments is that which teaches us to govern ourselves!" - Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

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[Quote No.55262] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The most important part of every business is to know what ought to be done." - Lucius Columell

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[Quote No.55265] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"The best kind of leader: one who creates independence, not dependence." - Gloria Steinem

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[Quote No.55285] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"Praise is sunshine; it warms, it inspires, it promotes growth . . . " - Harriet Beecher Stowe
Quoted in 'We and Our Neighbors', 1875.
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[Quote No.55286] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"I believe that you should praise people whenever you can; it causes them to respond as a thirsty plant responds to water." - Mary Kay Ash

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[Quote No.55288] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"What every genuine philosopher [every genuine man or woman, in fact] craves most is praise -- although the philosophers generally call it recognition." - William James

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[Quote No.55290] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"A little praise is not only the merest justice but is beyond the purse of no one." - Emily Post

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