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  Quotations - Make  
[Quote No.56416] Need Area: Work > Make
"[Design for great user experience:] Focus unswervingly on the customer." - Jesse Hertzberg
Former COO at Squarespace
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[Quote No.56418] Need Area: Work > Make
"Most [unsuccessful] business models have focused on self-interest instead of user experience! " - Tim Cook
CEO at Apple
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[Quote No.56419] Need Area: Work > Make
"[Design:] Empathy is important to understanding users holistically." - Shlomo Goltz
User Researcher at Hearsay Social
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[Quote No.56420] Need Area: Work > Make
"To be a great designer, you need to look a little deeper into how people think and act." - Paul Boag
Co-Founder of Headscape Limited
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[Quote No.56423] Need Area: Work > Make
"By solving our own most difficult problems, we're potentially creating [solutions - products and services - with] immense value for everyone else!!" - Jason Amunwa
Director of Products at Digital Telepathy
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[Quote No.56424] Need Area: Work > Make
"To design is much more than simply to assemble, to order, or even to edit; it is to add value and meaning, to illuminate, to simplify, to clarify, to modify, to dignify, to dramatize, to persuade, and perhaps even to amuse." - Paul Rand

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[Quote No.56425] Need Area: Work > Make
"Anything we can do to make things simpler and more transparent is a plus. " - Cap Watkins
Sr. Design Manager at Etsy
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[Quote No.56426] Need Area: Work > Make
"Netflix is unapologetically data driven - we believe in testing ideas in the marketplace." - Rochelle King
Former VP of UX [user experience] at Netflix
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[Quote No.56427] Need Area: Work > Make
"The attributes that make certain products engaging also make them potentially addictive." - Nir Eyal
Author of 'Hooked: How to Build Habit-Forming Products'.
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[Quote No.56428] Need Area: Work > Make
"It takes no skills to make something crappy. Skills are only required to make something great." - Jared Spool
Founder at User Interface Engineering
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[Quote No.56434] Need Area: Work > Make
"If the user is having a problem, it's our problem." - Steve Jobs

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[Quote No.56436] Need Area: Work > Make
"Want your users to fall in love with your designs? Fall in love with your users." - Dana Chisnell

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[Quote No.56437] Need Area: Work > Make
"If the user can't use it, it doesn't work. " - Susan Dray

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[Quote No.56518] Need Area: Work > Make
"There's no great mystery to satisfying your customers. Build them a quality product and treat them with respect. It's that simple!" - Lee Iacocca

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[Quote No.56655] Need Area: Work > Make
"I was interested in creating things I would be proud of." - Richard Branson
British businessman
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[Quote No.57237] Need Area: Work > Make
"[Make using] ...the golden rule. You want to deliver to the world what you would buy if you were on the other end." - Charlie Munger

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[Quote No.58564] Need Area: Work > Make
"Our success at Amazon is a function of how many experiments we do per year, per month, per week, per day... " - Jeff Bezos
Founder, president, chief executive officer, and chairman of the board of Amazon.com.
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[Quote No.58707] Need Area: Work > Make
"[Product and service innovation and testing:] This blog will teach you the process of running a 'design sprint' – a method developed by Jake Knapp, a partner at Google Ventures – to solve big problems and test new ideas in just five days. Most teams often invest months, even years, in developing a product or service -- only to discover they've built something that no one wants. Jake developed a method that helps teams make better use of time and resources by simulating the entire product development process in just five days. A design sprint helps teams filter ideas and gain clarity as to which of them are best to pursue. Let's dive in and see what that process looks like at a high level, and how to implement it. For more a more detailed, step-by-step process, check out Jake's book. --- Preparing for the Sprint --- To kick-off a design sprint, your goal is to assemble a diverse team from within your company of five to eight experts in different areas of the business. Jake notes that the sweet spot here is seven people -- any more will only 'create drag.' An ideal team involves representation from the engineering, sales, customer support and marketing departments, as well as, critically, 'the Decision Maker.' Each person brings a key understanding to the process: engineering understands product capabilities, sales understands customer preferences, customer support sees customer challenges, and marketing holds key insights that tie it all together. Over the course of the next five days, the team will develop and test a number of different things. You can run sprints on key features (What should my landing page look like? How should we price it?), product variations (Do people prefer this type of product or something else?), or entirely new businesses (Does this business solve a key problem for a customer? Are they willing to pay for this product?). Here's how the five key days play out... --- Day 1: Monday -- Map and Define the Problem --- Day 1 is about defining the problem you want to solve. The decisionmaker in the group should facilitate the agreement around a long-term goal. What the company or product should achieve in, say, eight months' time. Make sure everyone is aligned and excited about this goal, write it down and post it on the wall. Then, map out a series of difficult questions, potential barriers to achieving that goal: -- What are the technical and market risks? -- What if people don't care about it? -- What if they won't use it? -- What might they not trust? After you've mapped out the questions, spend time trying to answer the most important of them based on the information you know. Next, brainstorm and list as many different types of customers (demographics) that you believe have the problem you are trying to solve. Now pick one (either the one you best understand or the largest cohort). This is the customer for whom you are going to be (designing) running the design sprint. Based on this understanding, one team member is next assigned to recruit five real potential customers who fit these characteristics from outside the company. These five people will be asked to physically show up on Friday to test the product you're designing. Why five? Back in the 90s, Jakob Nielsen did a study to answer this question: 'How many interviews does it take to spot the most important patterns?' It turns out that 85 percent of the problems were observed after just FIVE people reviewed a product! Additionally, the deadline of actual customers coming in five days creates an added incentive to have a workable product finished by then. The team's last task for Day 1 is to Ask the Experts. Somebody out in the world knows 'the most' about your customers; somebody knows the most about the technology, the marketing channels, the business, and so on. Your goal is to find them and pick their brains. This is usually where people find the most exciting ideas. --- Day 2: Tuesday -- Create Solutions --- Jake compares ideas in product design to LEGO bricks: they can be combined and recombined in new ways to create something better. On Day 2, the team first sketches (literally, on large sticky notes) competitors' solutions and puts them up on the wall for everyone to see. Next, each team member sketches new solutions that combine these 'LEGO bricks' to address the problem identified on Day 1. Each person does their sketching on their own and submits their sketches anonymously. Each member can submit one, two or even three solutions. This individual process prevents the groupthink that occurs with traditional brainstorming. The goal is for each individual to create fully fleshed out ideas, empowering introverted team members to contribute equally. Note: You need to be quite thorough with these sketches -- they should illustrate how the solution would work for the target customer, what the customer sees going through the app or website, and so on… They can be rough, but they should be very detailed and precise. --- Day 3: Wednesday -- Downselect --- Suspense is high coming in on Wednesday morning. The team tapes up sketches and everyone marks their favorite ideas with a dot. The team engages in a timed critique of each concept. Interestingly, the person who sketched it isn't allowed to speak until the end. This minimizes bias and ensures the process is truly meritocratic, allowing people to be as honest as possible with their critique. In a group of seven sprint participants, there may be anywhere from seven to 15 proposed storyboard solutions. The team votes on the solutions they believe in and are most excited about testing. The clincher, however, is that The Decision Maker casts 'super-votes,' which supersede all other votes, choosing up to three solutions to test fully on Friday. Ideally, though, you pick the best single prototype to answer the question you defined at the beginning of the week. Next, create a storyboard. The team should flesh out the top idea(s), detailing everything from discovery (i.e. how a user comes across the product for the first time -- for example, on a store shelf, via a web search or news article) to every other part of the user experience. In other words, this storyboard needs to be able to stand alone without a verbal explanation, so it may be evaluated in an unbiased manner, on their merits alone, not based on who created the storyboard. The next step is to take the idea beyond the storyboard and transform it into a high-resolution mockup that looks and feels like an actual product. --- Day 4: Thursday -- Put It All Together and Build the Mockup --- Once the team has an idea of how everything will look and feel, they assign tasks to different team members to build a prototype. A good rule of thumb is: Build just enough to learn, but not more... These prototypes don't have to be fully functional, but they should look like they are. Buttons might not fully work, but when pressed should drive the customer down a different path... Jake calls this 'Goldilocks Quality' – the prototype should have just enough quality to evoke honest reactions from customers. After team members build their mockup, the team regroups to connect the pieces and flesh out the full experience they want to put their five clients through tomorrow. They need to assure everything appears realistic and cohesive. --- Day 5: Friday -- Observe Customer Reactions (and Learn!) --- Day 5 is when the real fun begins – you get detailed and authentic feedback from real customers. The five people you recruited on Day 1 have shown up to test the product/prototype. It's best to bring them in face-to-face to test the product in person if possible, though videoconferencing can suffice in some cases. Identify 'The Interviewer' on your team – this person will interact one-on-one with your customer, who is testing the product. The rest of your design team observes customer reactions via live video in a separate room. The Interviewer asks the customer different questions (you should write a script): -- What do you think about what just happened? -- How would you compare the different options? -- What worked? -- What didn’t? -- Would you buy this? CRITICALLY -- The team observes customer reactions, rather than listens to feedback. This ensures that the insights they glean are as honest as possible. By the end of this observation, you should be able to see patterns. You'll know what's working well and resonating, and what's confusing and what people don't care about. These insights answer some of the larger questions posed at the beginning of the sprint and inform the direction that the team will head in next. This knowledge is extremely valuable and gathering it now will save you an incredible amount of time and money later. What does this mean for you? Design sprints are an essential tool that entrepreneurs can use to fail fast, rapidly iterate and grow quickly. For me it's part of my year-long exploration of how to best 'experiment' in building my businesses, products and services. Working in a group environment successfully is difficult and, as Jake mentioned, A crucial, but overlooked, part of the design process is designing the way in which we work together. The structured design sprint process enables teams to operate in ways that are effective in gleaning real, actionable insights about what works and what doesn't. It empowers individuals with crazy ideas and also squashes ideas that aren't validated by customers. If your team is grappling with whether to launch a new feature or product, it's worth giving a design sprint a try. You'll be amazed by the results." - Peter Diamandis
[Refer http://www.thesprintbook.com/ and http://www.amazon.com/Sprint-Solve-Problems-Test-Ideas/dp/150112174X ]
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[Quote No.59258] Need Area: Work > Make
"[Planned continual improvement is very important:-] The greatest thing [the co-founder of Apple, Steve] Jobs designed was his business. Apple imagined and executed definite multi-year plans to create new products and distribute them effectively." - Peter Thiel
As quoted in 'Zero to One: Notes on Startups, or How to Build the Future', published 2014.
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[Quote No.59574] Need Area: Work > Make
"[There are no ultimate limits to improvement:] I will ignore all ideas for new works and engines of war, the invention of which has reached its limits and for whose improvement I see no further hope." - Julius Frontinus
Chief military engineer to the Emperor Vespasian, circa AD 70.
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[Quote No.60141] Need Area: Work > Make
"I'm an inventor. I became interested in long-term trends because an invention has to make sense in the world in which it is finished, not the world in which it is started." - Ray Kurzweil

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[Quote No.60213] Need Area: Work > Make
"Every day that we spent not improving our products was a wasted day." - Joel Spolsky
Co-Founder of Stack Exchange
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[Quote No.60502] Need Area: Work > Make
"Be so good they can't ignore you!" - Steve Martin

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[Quote No.61517] Need Area: Work > Make
"Google Ventures: Design Sprint - A Sprint, invented by my friends Jake Knapp and John Zeratsky of Google Ventures, is a fantastic tool for rapid experimentation in your company. I have leveraged the Sprint process across all of my companies. Participating in a Sprint orients the entire team and aims their efforts at hitting clearly defined goals. Sprints are useful starting points when kicking off a new feature, workflow, product, business or solving problems with an existing product. Here are the five phases of a Sprint, typically done sequentially over the course of five days, that you can try with you team: -- Day 1: Understand: Develop a common understanding of the working context, including the problem, the business, the customer, the value proposition and how success will be determined. By the end of this phase, you should also aim to identify some of your biggest risks and start to make plans to mitigate them. Common understanding will empower everyone's decisionmaking and contributions to the project. Understanding your risks enables you to stay risk-averse and avoid investing time and money on things that rely on unknowns or assumptions. -- Day 2: Diverge: Generate insights and potential solutions to your customer's problems. Explore as many ways of solving the problems as possible, regardless of how realistic, feasible, or viable they may or may not be. The opportunity this phase generates enables you to evaluate and rationally eliminate options and identify potentially viable solutions to move forward with. This phase is also crucial to innovation and marketplace differentiation. -- Day 3: Converge: Take all of the possibilities exposed during phases 1 and 2, eliminate the wild and currently unfeasible ideas and hone in on the ideas you feel best about. These ideas will guide the implementation of a prototype in phase 4 that will be tested with existing or potential customers. Not every idea is actionable or feasible, and only some will fit the situation and problem context. Exploring many alternative solutions helps provide confidence that you are heading in the right direction. -- Day 4: Prototype: Build a prototype that can be tested with existing or potential customers. Design the prototype to learn about specific unknowns and assumptions. Determine its medium by time constraints and learning goals. Paper, Keynote, and simple HTML/CSS are all good prototyping tools for software products and 3D printing for hardware. The prototype storyboard and the first three phases of the Sprint should make prototype-building fairly straightforward. There shouldn't be much uncertainty around what must be done. A prototype is a very low-cost way of gaining valuable insights about what the product needs to be. Once you know what works and what doesn't, you can confidently invest time and money on more permanent implementation. -- Day 5: Test and Learn: Test the prototype with existing or potential customers. It is important to test with existing or potential customers, because they are the ones for whom you want your product to work and be valuable. Their experiences with the problem and knowledge of the context have influence on their interaction with your product that non-customers won't have. Your customers will show you the product they need. Testing your ideas helps you learn more about things you previously knew little about and gives you a much clearer understanding of which directions you should move towards next. It can also help you course-correct and avoid building the wrong product. Sprints offer a path to solve big problems, test new ideas, and accelerate the decisionmaking process. BTW, you can learn a lot more about the Sprint Process here: http://www.gv.com/sprint/. " - Peter Diamandis
Greek-American engineer, physician, and entrepreneur best known for being the founder and chairman of the X Prize Foundation, the co-founder and executive chairman of Singularity University and the co-author of the New York Times bestsellers 'Abundance: The Future Is Better Than You Think' and 'BOLD: How to Go Big, Create Wealth, and Impact the World'. He is also the former CEO and co-founder of the Zero Gravity Corporation, the co-founder and vice chairman of Space Adventures Ltd., the founder and chairman of the Rocket Racing League, the co-founder of the International Space University, the co-founder of Planetary Resources, founder of Students for the Exploration and Development of Space, and vice-chairman and co-founder of Human Longevity, Inc.
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[Quote No.61646] Need Area: Work > Make
"Most people run from problems. If you want to get ahead, go to your manager [customer, etc] and say, 'You got problems? Give me some.' Instead of running from problems like most people, go after them. If you do, I'll guarantee, it will change your life! That's the way you get ahead, by solving problems!!" - Dave Anderson

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[Quote No.62022] Need Area: Work > Make
"I never, ever thought of myself as a businessman. I was interested in creating things I would be proud of!" - Richard Branson
British businessman
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[Quote No.62469] Need Area: Work > Make
"When I get an idea I start at once building it up in my imagination. I change the construction, make improvements and operate the device in my mind. It is absolutely immaterial to me whether I run my turbine in my thought or test it in my shop. I even note if it is out of balance!" - Nikola Tesla

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[Quote No.62697] Need Area: Work > Make
"The golden rule for every businessman is this: 'Put yourself in your customer's place!'" - Orison Swett Marden

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[Quote No.62736] Need Area: Work > Make
"Invention is the most important product of man's creative brain. The ultimate purpose is the complete mastery of mind over the material world, the harnessing of human nature to human needs." - Nikola Tesla
'My Inventions: The Autobiography of Nikola Tesla'
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