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  Quotations - Music  
[Quote No.53686] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music is the divine way to tell beautiful, poetic things to the heart." - Pablo Casals
(1876 - 1973)
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[Quote No.53829] Need Area: Fun > Music
"These are the sort of things that push you on in music - the curiosity, a passion for new ideas." - Elvis Costello

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[Quote No.53837] Need Area: Fun > Music
"I have a curiosity that compels me to find ways to make music that are fresh and new." - David Howell Evans
David Howell Evans, more widely known by his stage name The Edge, is a British-born Irish musician, songwriter and singer best known as the guitarist, keyboardist and vocalist with the rock band U2.
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[Quote No.53871] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Five Ways Music Can Make You Healthier - New studies are suggesting that music can be more powerful than medication: When I gave birth to my first-born, I listened to CDs of classical music in the hospital. I figured that music would help calm me and distract me from the pain. You might use music to distract yourself from painful or stressful situations, too. Or perhaps you’ve listened to music while studying or working out, hoping to up your performance. Though you may sense that music helps you feel better somehow, only recently has science begun to figure out why that is. Neuroscientists have discovered that listening to music heightens positive emotion through the reward centers of our brain, stimulating hits of dopamine that can make us feel good, or even elated. Listening to music also lights up other areas of the brain - in fact, almost no brain center is left untouched - suggesting more widespread effects and potential uses for music. Music’s neurological reach, and its historic role in healing and cultural rituals, has led researchers to consider ways music may improve our health and wellbeing. In particular, researchers have looked for applications in health-care - for example, helping patients during post-surgery recovery or improving outcomes for people with Alzheimer’s. In some cases, music’s positive impacts on health have been more powerful than medication. Here are five ways that music seems to impact our health and wellbeing. ---1: Music reduces stress and anxiety: My choice to bring music into the birthing room was probably a good one. Research has shown that listening to music - at least music with a slow tempo and low pitch, without lyrics or loud instrumentation - can calm people down, even during highly stressful or painful events. Music can prevent anxiety-induced increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure, and decrease cortisol levels—all biological markers of stress. In one study, researchers found that patients receiving surgery for hernia repair who listened to music after surgery experienced decreased plasma cortisol levels and required significantly less morphine to manage their pain. In another study involving surgery patients, the stress reducing effects of music were more powerful than the effect of an orally-administered anxiolytic drug. Performing music, versus listening to music, may also have a calming effect. In studies with adult choir singers, singing the same piece of music tended to synch up their breathing and heart rates, producing a group-wide calming effect. In a recent study, 272 premature babies were exposed to different kinds of music - either lullabies sung by parents or instruments played by a music therapist - three times a week while recovering in a neonatal ICU. Though all the musical forms improved the babies’ functioning, the parental singing had the greatest impact and also reduced the stress of the parents who sang. Though it’s sometimes hard in studies like this to separate out the effects of music versus other factors, like the positive impacts of simple social contact, at least one recent study found that music had a unique contribution to make in reducing anxiety and stress in a children’s hospital, above and beyond social contributions. ---2: Music decreases pain: Music has a unique ability to help with pain management, as I found in my own experience with giving birth. In a 2013 study, sixty people diagnosed with fibromyalgia - a disease characterized by severe musculoskeletal pain - were randomly assigned to listen to music once a day over a four-week period. In comparison to a control group, the group that listened to music experienced significant pain reduction and fewer depressive symptoms. In another recent study, patients undergoing spine surgery were instructed to listen to self-selected music on the evening before their surgery and until the second day after their surgery. When measured on pain levels post surgery, the group had significantly less pain than a control group who didn’t listen to music. It’s not clear why music may reduce pain, though music’s impact on dopamine release may play a role. Of course, stress and pain are also closely linked; so music’s impact on stress reduction may also partly explain the effects. However, it’s unlikely that music’s impact is due to a simple placebo effect. In a 2014 randomized control trial involving healthy subjects exposed to painful stimuli, researchers failed to find a link between expectation and music’s effects on pain. The researchers concluded that music is a robust analgesic whose properties are not due simply to expectation factors. ---3: Music may improve immune functioning: Can listening to music actually help prevent disease? Some researchers think so. Wilkes University researchers looked at how music affects levels of IgA—an important antibody for our immune system’s first line of defense against disease. Undergraduate students had their salivary IgA levels measured before and after 30 minutes of exposure to one of four conditions—listening to a tone click, a radio broadcast, a tape of soothing music, or silence. Those students exposed to the soothing music had significantly greater increases in IgA than any of the other conditions, suggesting that exposure to music (and not other sounds) might improve innate immunity. Another study from Massachusetts General Hospital found that listening to Mozart’s piano sonatas helped relax critically ill patients by lowering stress hormone levels, but the music also decreased blood levels of interleukin-6—a protein that has been implicated in higher mortality rates, diabetes, and heart problems. According to a 2013 meta-analysis, authors Mona Lisa Chanda and Daniel Levitin concluded that music has the potential to augment immune response systems, but that the findings to date are preliminary. Still, as Levitin notes in one article on the study, ‘I think the promise of music as medicine is that it’s natural and it’s cheap and it doesn’t have the unwanted side effects that many pharmaceutical products do.’ ---4: Music may aid memory: My now-teenage son always listens to music while he studies. Far from being a distraction to him, he claims it helps him remember better when it comes to test time. Now research may prove him right—and provide an insight that could help people suffering from dementia. Music enjoyment elicits dopamine release, and dopamine release has been tied to motivation, which in turn is implicated in learning and memory. In a study published last year, adult students studying Hungarian were asked to speak, or speak in a rhythmic fashion, or sing phrases in the unfamiliar language. Afterwards, when asked to recall the foreign phrases, the singing group fared significantly better than the other two groups in recall accuracy. Evidence that music helps with memory has led researchers to study the impact of music on special populations, such as those who suffer memory loss due to illness. In a 2008 experiment, stroke patients who were going through rehab were randomly assigned to listen daily either to self-selected music, to an audio book, or to nothing (in addition to receiving their usual care). The patients were then tested on mood, quality of life, and several cognitive measures at one week, three months, and 6 months post-stroke. Results showed that those in the music group improved significantly more on verbal memory and focused attention than those in the other groups, and they were less depressed and confused than controls at each measuring point. In a more recent study, caregivers and patients with dementia were randomly given 10 weeks of singing coaching, 10 weeks of music listening coaching, or neither. Afterwards, testing showed that singing and music listening improved mood, orientation, and memory and, to a lesser extent, attention and executive functioning, as well as providing other benefits. Studies like these have encouraged a movement to incorporate music into patient care for dementia patients, in part promoted by organizations like Music and Memory. ---5: Music helps us exercise: How many of us listen to rock and roll or other upbeat music while working out? It turns out that research supports what we instinctively feel: music helps us get a more bang for our exercise buck. Researchers in the United Kingdom recruited thirty participants to listen to motivational synchronized music, non-motivational synchronized music, or no music while they walked on a treadmill until they reached exhaustion levels. Measurements showed that both music conditions increased the length of time participants worked out (though motivational music increased it significantly more) when compared to controls. The participants who listened to motivational music also said they felt better during their work out than those in the other two conditions. In another study, oxygen consumption levels were measured while people listened to different tempos of music during their exercise on a stationary bike. Results showed that when exercisers listened to music with a beat that was faster and synchronous with their movement, their bodies used up oxygen more efficiently than when the music played at a slower, unsynchronized tempo. According to sports researchers Peter Terry and Costas Karageorghis, ‘Music has the capacity to capture attention, lift spirits, generate emotion, change or regulate mood, evoke memories, increase work output, reduce inhibitions, and encourage rhythmic movement – all of which have potential applications in sport and exercise.’ " - Jill Suttie
January 20, 2015 [Refer http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/five_ways_music_can_make_you_healthier? ]
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[Quote No.53874] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Why We Love Music: Researchers are discovering how music affects the brain, helping us to make sense of its real emotional and social power. I still remember when I first heard the song by Peter Gabriel, ‘Solsbury Hill.’ Something about that song - the lyrics, the melody, the unusual 7/4 time signature - gave me chills. Even now, years later, it still can make me cry. Who among us doesn’t have a similar story about a song that touched us? Whether attending a concert, listening to the radio, or singing in the shower, there’s something about music that can fill us with emotion, from joy to sadness. Music impacts us in ways that other sounds don’t, and for years now, scientists have been wondering why. Now they are finally beginning to find some answers. Using fMRI technology, they’re discovering why music can inspire such strong feelings and bind us so tightly to other people. ‘Music affects deep emotional centers in the brain,' says Valorie Salimpoor, a neuroscientist at McGill University who studies the brain on music. ‘A single sound tone is not really pleasurable in itself; but if these sounds are organized over time in some sort of arrangement, it’s amazingly powerful.’ ----- How music makes the brain happy: How powerful? In one of her studies, she and her colleagues hooked up participants to an fMRI machine and recorded their brain activity as they listened to a favorite piece of music. During peak emotional moments in the songs identified by the listeners, dopamine was released in the nucleus accumbens, a structure deep within the older part of our human brain. ‘That’s a big deal, because dopamine is released with biological rewards, like eating and sex, for example,’ says Salimpoor. ‘It’s also released with drugs that are very powerful and addictive, like cocaine or amphetamines.’ There’s another part of the brain that seeps dopamine, specifically just before those peak emotional moments in a song: the caudate nucleus, which is involved in the anticipation of pleasure. Presumably, the anticipatory pleasure comes from familiarity with the song - you have a memory of the song you enjoyed in the past embedded in your brain, and you anticipate the high points that are coming. This pairing of anticipation and pleasure is a potent combination, one that suggests we are biologically-driven to listen to music we like. But what happens in our brains when we like something we haven’t heard before? To find out, Salimpoor again hooked up people to fMRI machines. But this time she had participants listen to unfamiliar songs, and she gave them some money, instructing them to spend it on any music they liked. When analyzing the brain scans of the participants, she found that when they enjoyed a new song enough to buy it, dopamine was again released in the nucleus accumbens. But, she also found increased interaction between the nucleus accumbens and higher, cortical structures of the brain involved in pattern recognition, musical memory, and emotional processing. This finding suggested to her that when people listen to unfamiliar music, their brains process the sounds through memory circuits, searching for recognizable patterns to help them make predictions about where the song is heading. If music is too foreign-sounding, it will be hard to anticipate the song’s structure, and people won’t like it - meaning, no dopamine hit. But, if the music has some recognizable features - maybe a familiar beat or melodic structure - people will more likely be able to anticipate the song’s emotional peaks and enjoy it more. The dopamine hit comes from having their predictions confirmed - or violated slightly, in intriguing ways. ‘It’s kind of like a roller coaster ride,’ she says, ‘where you know what’s going to happen, but you can still be pleasantly surprised and enjoy it.’ Salimpoor believes this combination of anticipation and intense emotional release may explain why people love music so much, yet have such diverse tastes in music - one’s taste in music is dependent on the variety of musical sounds and patterns heard and stored in the brain over the course of a lifetime. It’s why pop songs are, well, popular - their melodic structures and rhythms are fairly predictable, even when the song is unfamiliar - and why jazz, with its complicated melodies and rhythms, is more an acquired taste. On the other hand, people tend to tire of pop music more readily than they do of jazz, for the same reason - it can become too predictable. Her findings also explain why people can hear the same song over and over again and still enjoy it. The emotional hit off of a familiar piece of music can be so intense, in fact, that it’s easily re-stimulated even years later. ‘If I asked you to tell me a memory from high school, you would be able to tell me a memory,’ says Salimpoor. ‘But, if you listened to a piece of music from high school, you would actually feel the emotions.’ ------ How music synchronizes brains: Ed Large, a music psychologist at the University of Connecticut, agrees that music releases powerful emotions. His studies look at how variations in the dynamics of music - slowing down or speeding up of rhythm, or softer and louder sounds within a piece, for example - resonate in the brain, affecting one’s enjoyment and emotional response. In one study, Large and colleagues had participants listen to one of two variations on a Chopin piece: In version one, the piece was played as it normally is, with dynamic variations, while in version two, the piece was played mechanically, without these variations. When the participants listened to the two versions while hooked up to an fMRI machine, their pleasure centers lit up during dynamic moments in the version one song, but didn’t light up in version two. It was as if the song had lost its emotional resonance when it lost its dynamics, even though the ‘melody’ was the same. ‘In fact, when we debriefed the listeners after the experiment was over, they didn’t even recognize that we were playing the same piece of music,’ says Large. When playing the more dynamic version, Large also observed activity in the listener’s mirror neurons - the neurons implicated in our ability to experience internally what we observe externally. The neurons fired more slowly with slower tempos, and faster with faster tempos, suggesting that mirror neurons may play an important role in processing musical dynamics and affecting how we experience music. ‘Musical rhythms can directly affect your brain rhythms, and brain rhythms are responsible for how you feel at any given moment,’ says Large. That’s why when people get together and hear the same music - such as in a concert hall - it tends to make their brains synch up in rhythmic ways, inducing a shared emotional experience, he says. Music works in much the same way language works - using a combination of sound and dynamic variations to impart a certain understanding in the listener. ‘If I’m a performer and you’re a listener, and what I’m playing really moves you, I’ve basically synchronized your brain rhythm with mine,’ says Large. ‘That’s how I communicate with you.’ ----- Different notes for different folks: Other research on music supports Large’s theories. In one study, neuroscientists introduced different styles of songs to people and monitored brain activity. They found that music impacts many centers of the brain simultaneously; but, somewhat surprisingly, each style of music made its own pattern, with uptempo songs creating one kind of pattern, slower songs creating another, lyrical songs creating another, and so on. Even if people didn’t like the songs or didn’t have a lot of musical expertise, their brains still looked surprisingly similar to the brains of people who did. But if our brains all synch up when we hear the same basic dynamic differences in music, why don’t we all respond with the same pleasure? Large, like Salimpoor, says that this difference in preference is due to how our neurons are wired together, which in turn is based on our own, personal history of listening to or performing music. Rhythm is all about predictability, he says, and our predictions about music start forming from a pretty early age onward. He points to the work of Erin Hannon at the University of Nevada who found that babies as young as 8 months old already tune into the rhythms of the music from their own cultural environment. So while activity in the nucleus accumbens may signal emotional pleasure, it doesn’t explain it, says Large. Learning does. That’s why musicians - who’ve usually been exposed to more complicated musical patterns over time - tend to have more varied musical tastes and enjoy more avant-garde musical traditions than non-musicians. Social contexts are also important, he adds, and can affect your emotional responses. ‘Liking is so subjective,’ he says. ‘Music may not sound any different to you than to someone else, but you learn to associate it with something you like and you’ll experience a pleasure response.’ Perhaps that explains why I love ‘Solsbury Hill’ so much. Not only does its unusual rhythm intrigue me - as a musician, I still have the urge to count it out from time to time - but it reminds me of where I was when I first heard the song: sitting next to a cute guy I had a crush on in college. No doubt my anticipatory pleasure centers were firing away for a multitude of reasons. And, luckily, now that the pleasure pathways are now deeply embedded in my brain, the song can keep on giving that sweet emotional release." - Jill Suttie
She has a Doctor of Psychology degree (PsyD), is Greater Good's book review editor and is a frequent contributor to the magazine. She is also a singer/songwriter with two CD releases of her original songs, both available at cdbaby.com. January 12, 2015 [refer http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/why_we_love_music ]
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[Quote No.53875] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Four Ways Music Strengthens Social Bonds: Why would human evolution have given us music? New research says the answer may lie in our drive to connect. - In 2009, archeologists unearthed a flute carved from bone and ivory that was over 35,000 years old. This proved that even during the hunting/gathering stage of human evolution, music was present and important to society. Why else take time away from survival tasks to create a musical instrument? We know that music is pleasurable, and it seems to play a role in our wellbeing. But many researchers also believe that music plays a significant role in strengthening social bonds. In a 2013 review of the research on music, Stefan Koelsch, music psychologist at the Freie University Berlin, described several mechanisms through which music impacts our ability to connect with one another - by impacting brain circuits involved in empathy, trust, and cooperation - perhaps explaining how it has survived in every culture of the world. Although music can certainly be played and listened to alone, in the shower or on your iPod, it is also a powerful social magnet. After all, a music concert is one of the few times when we will gather together with thousands of other people to engage in a shared activity. There is something about listening to music, or playing it with other people, that brings its own social buzz, making you feel connected to those around you. Here are some ways scientists believe that music strengthens social bonds. ----- 1. Music increases contact, coordination, and cooperation with others: For much of human history, the only way to experience music was live - there were no recordings allowing us to share music outside of performance. Since music had to involve contact with others (e.g. coming together for a concert), it provided a net of physical and psychological safety that may have helped our early ancestors - and may still help us - to survive. Performing music involves coordinating of our efforts, too…at least if we want to produce a pleasing sound. According to researchers, when we try to synch with others musically - keeping the beat or harmonizing, for example - we tend to feel positive social feelings towards those with whom we’re synchronizing, even if that person is not visible to us or not in the same room. Though it’s unclear exactly why that happens, coordinating movement with another person is linked to the release of pleasure chemicals (endorphins) in the brain, which may explain why we get those positive, warm feelings when we make music together. Playing music in a band or singing in a choir certainly involves cooperation as well - whether in preparation for the performance or during the performance. Arguably, cooperation increases trust between individuals and increases one’s chances of future cooperation - important factors in human evolutionary success and societal stability. ----- 2. Music gives us an oxytocin boost: Oxytocin is a neuropeptide affiliated with breast-feeding and sexual contact, and is known to play an important role in increasing bonding and trust between people. Now researchers are discovering that music may affect oxytocin levels in the body. In one experiment involving a breed of ‘singing’ mice, mice that had their oxytocin receptor sites artificially knocked out by researchers engaged in fewer vocalizations and showed marked social deficits when compared to normal mice, suggesting a link between singing, oxytocin, and socialization. In a study with humans, singing for 30 minutes was shown to significantly raise oxytocin levels in both amateur and professional singers, regardless of how happy or unhappy the experience made them. Perhaps this explains why new mothers often sing lullabies to their newborn babies: it may help encourage bonding through oxytocin release. Researchers have also found that listening to music releases oxytocin. In one study, patients undergoing coronary bypass surgery were asked to listen to experimenter-selected ‘soothing’ music for 30 minutes one day after surgery. When tested later, those who’d listened to music had higher levels of serum oxytocin compared to those who were assigned to bed-rest alone. Though the study was more focused on the relaxation properties of music than on oxytocin specifically, it still suggests that music directly impacts oxytocin levels, which, in turn, affect our ability to trust and act generously toward others - factors that increase our social connection. ------ 3. Music strengthens our ‘theory of mind’ and empathy: Music has been shown to activate many areas of the brain, including the circuit that helps us to understand what others are thinking and feeling, and to predict how they might behave - a social skill scientists call ‘theory of mind,’ which is linked to empathy. In one study, Koelsch and a colleague hooked up participants to an fMRI machine and had them listen to a piece of music that they were told was either composed by a human or by a computer (even though it was actually the same piece of music). When participants listened to music they believed was composed by a human, their ‘theory of mind’ cortical network lit up, while it didn’t under the computer condition. This suggests that our brain doesn’t just process sound when we hear music, but instead tries to understand the intent of the musician and what’s being communicated. In a more recent study, a group of primary-school-aged children were exposed to musical games with other children for one hour a week over the course of an academic year, while two control groups of same-aged children received either no games or games with the same purpose, but involving drama or storytelling instead of music. All of the children were given various empathy measures at the beginning and end of the year; but only the music group significantly increased their empathy scores, suggesting that music may have played a pivotal role in their empathy development. ------ 4. Music increases cultural cohesion: Think of a favorite lullaby or children’s song passed down through the generations, or of crowds listening to the national anthem at a baseball game. Music is one way of communicating belonging, which may increase your sense of safety and obligation toward your group. When we discover that someone likes a piece of music that we like, we tend to think better of them - as if musical preference had a deeper meaning than just entertainment. In fact, studies have shown that people affiliate musical taste with holding certain values, and that this assumed connection between music and values influences how much we think we’ll like someone based on their musical tastes. Music also influences how we think others will get along. In one recent study, participants listened to music or to silence while they watched videotapes in which three people were seen walking either in step or out of step with one another. When asked to rate levels of rapport and sense of unity among the three walkers in both conditions, the participants who listened to music perceived a greater rapport and unity among the walkers than those participants who didn’t listen to music. This suggests that music somehow strengthens our perception of social cohesion among people, perhaps through mistaking our own feelings for those of the people we observe. Studies find that social cohesion is higher within families and among peer groups when young people listen to music with their family members or peers, respectively. This effect is true even in cultures where interdependence is less valued, pointing to music’s potential to act as ‘social glue’ that binds people together. Of course, sometimes these effects can backfire. For example, some have argued that music - specifically the music of Wagner in early 20th Century Germany - played a role in Hitler’s propaganda machine, uniting people emotionally for a hideous political agenda. This reveals the degree to which human bonding can sometimes result in exclusion or even aggression toward out-groups - a tendency that we must continually guard against. In fact, music works a lot like language does - except instead of words and ideas, emotions and intent are communicated. In this way, music, like language, can be passed on from generation to generation, creating a sense of continuity and loyalty to one’s tribe. Nowadays, music has the potential to make us feel connected to all of humanity. The more we use music to bring us together - literally and figuratively - the more potential for increased empathy, social connection, and cooperation. I, for one, feel more connected to my human ancestors just knowing that someone took the time to carve that flute, succumbing to the primal urge to make music. It’s an urge I share. Perhaps we all do." - Jill Suttie
She has a Psy.D., is Greater Good's book review editor and is a frequent contributor to the magazine. January 15, 2015 [Refer http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/four_ways_music_strengthens_social_bonds ]
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[Quote No.54431] Need Area: Fun > Music
"[Often] Life is a shipwreck, but we must not forget to sing in the lifeboats!" - Voltaire

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[Quote No.54665] Need Area: Fun > Music
"This song of mine will wind its music around you, my child, like the fond arms of love. The song of mine will touch your forehead like a kiss of blessing. When you are alone it will sit by your side and whisper in your ear, when you are in the crowd it will fence you about with aloofness. My song will be like a pair of wings to your dreams, it will transport your heart to the verge of the unknown. It will be like the faithful star overhead when dark night is over your road. My song will sit in the pupils of your eyes, and will carry your sight into the heart of things. And when my voice is silenced in death, my song will speak in your living heart!" - Rabindranath Tagore
‘My Song’
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[Quote No.55498] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Movie actors [musicians and others in the art and entertainment industries] are just ordinary, mixed-up people — with [sales] agents!" - Jean Kerr

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[Quote No.56362] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music touches us emotionally where words alone can't." - Johnny Depp

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[Quote No.56616] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Take a music bath once or twice a week for a few seasons, and you will find that it is to the soul what the water bath is to the body." - Oliver Wendell Holmes

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[Quote No.56654] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music [without lyrics], uniquely among the arts, is both completely abstract and profoundly emotional. It has no power to represent anything particular or external, but it has a unique power to express inner states or feelings. Music can pierce the heart directly; it needs no mediation." - Oliver Sacks
(1933 - 2015), British neurologist, naturalist and author. Quote from his book ‘Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain’.
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[Quote No.57429] Need Area: Fun > Music
"[Smile and laugh, whistle, hum and sing, etc:] Actions seems to follow feeling, but really actions and feeling go together; and by regulating the action, which is under the more direct control of the will, we can indirectly regulate the feeling, which is not. [So as they say, 'act till it's a fact' and 'fake it till make it'.] Thus the sovereign voluntary path to cheerfulness, if our cheerfulness be lost, is to sit up cheerfully and to act and speak as if cheerfulness were already there." - William James

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[Quote No.57432] Need Area: Fun > Music
"[Smile and laugh, whistle, hum and sing, etc:] Put a BIG, broad, honest-to-God smile on your face; throw back your shoulders; take a good, deep breath; and sing a snatch of a song. If you can't sing whistle. If you can't whistle, hum. You will quickly discover what William James was talking about -- [namely, 'Actions seems to follow feeling, but really actions and feeling go together; and by regulating the action, which is under the more direct control of the will, we can indirectly regulate the feeling, which is not.'] -- that it is physically impossible to remain blue or depressed while you are acting out the symptoms of being radiantly happy!" - Dale Carnegie
From his book, 'How to Stop Worrying and Start Living', p.56.
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[Quote No.58091] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Consider any day lost on which you have not danced at least once." - Friedrich Nietzsche
(1844 - 1900), German philosopher, cultural critic, poet, and Latin and Greek scholar whose work has exerted a profound influence on Western philosophy and modern intellectual history.
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[Quote No.58332] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music is moonlight in the gloomy night of life. " - Jean Paul Friedrich Richter

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[Quote No.58704] Need Area: Fun > Music
"The springs of our reaction to music lie deeper than thought... Part of what music allows me is the freedom to drift off into a reverie of my own, stimulated but not constrained by the inventions of the composer. " - Wendy Lesser
As quoted in her book, 'Room for Doubt'.
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[Quote No.58710] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music unites all qualities: it can exalt us, divert us, cheer us up, or break the hardest of hearts with the softest of its melancholy tones. But its principal task is to lead our thoughts to higher things, to elevate, even to make us tremble... The musical art often speaks in sounds more penetrating than the words of poetry, and takes hold of the most hidden crevices of the heart... Song elevates our being and leads us to the good and the true." - Friedrich Nietzsche
As quoted in Julian Young's book, 'Friedrich Nietzsche: A Philosophical Biography'.
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[Quote No.58711] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music expresses that which cannot be put into words and that which cannot remain silent. " - Victor Hugo
Great French Romantic poet, novelist, and dramatist.
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[Quote No.58712] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music, uniquely among the arts, is both completely abstract and profoundly emotional. It has no power to represent anything particular or external, but it has a unique power to express inner states or feelings. Music can pierce the heart directly..." - Oliver Sacks
As quoted from his book, 'Musicophilia: Tales of Music and the Brain'.
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[Quote No.58898] Need Area: Fun > Music
"We're all affected by music. It has the power to inspire, uplift us, change our moods, and even alter consciousness." - Dr. Andrew Weil
American physician, author, spokesperson, and broadly described 'guru' for holistic health and integrative medicine, whose names also constitute an emerging brand of healthcare services and products in these fields.
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[Quote No.60628] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Who hears music, feels his solitude peopled at once. " - Robert Browning
He wrote this in 1871.
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[Quote No.60629] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Take a music bath once or twice a week for a few seasons, and you will find that it is to the soul what the water-bath is to the body." - Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

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[Quote No.60630] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Great music is that which penetrates the ear with facility and leaves the memory with difficulty. Magical music never leaves the memory." - Sir Thomas Beecham

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[Quote No.60631] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Without music, life is a journey through a desert." - Pat Conroy

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[Quote No.61462] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music is a human universal — no known culture now or any time in the past has lacked music, and its emotional significance is well known. Mothers in every culture sing to their infants, making music one of the newborn's first experiences. It is present during a wide variety of human activities — birthdays, religious ceremonies, political gatherings, sporting events, parties and romantic encounters." - Adiel Mallik, Mona Lisa Chanda, and Daniel J. Levitin
Quote from their research article, 'Anhedonia to music and mu-opioids: Evidence from the administration of naltrexone'. [Refer http://www.nature.com/articles/srep41952 ]
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[Quote No.61550] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Music engages most of the limbic system, including the hippocampus, anterior cingulate, and nucleus accumbens, which is why it can be motivating and enjoyable and can help regulate your emotions. It can also be soothing, lowering blood pressure and reducing stress." - Alex Korb PhD
Quote from his book, 'The Upward Spiral: Using Neuroscience to Reverse the Course of Depression, One Small Change at a Time'.
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[Quote No.62242] Need Area: Fun > Music
"As music unfolds, the brain constantly updates its estimates of when new beats will occur, and takes satisfaction in matching a mental beat with a real-in-the-world one. " - Daniel Levitin
From his book, 'This is Your Brain on Music'.
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[Quote No.62312] Need Area: Fun > Music
"I've always thought people would find a lot more pleasure in their routines if they burst into song at significant moments." - John Barrowman
Actor
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[Quote No.62700] Need Area: Fun > Music
"Writing about music is like dancing about architecture." - Martin Mull

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