Imagi-Natives advice on:
0 0
Daily Needs
Mind Needs
 Learn Quotes (5012)
 Imagine Quotes (1915)
Plan Quotes (1665)
 Focus Quotes (2121)
Persist Quotes (5292)
 Evolve Quotes (1500)
Progress Quotes (290)
 General Quotes (295)
Body Needs
 Health Quotes (565)
 Exercise Quotes (413)
 Grooming Quotes (146)
 General Quotes (823)
Money Needs
 Income Quotes (238)
 Tax Quotes (525)
 Save Quotes (186)
 Invest Quotes (4012)
 Spend Quotes (319)
 General Quotes (1228)
Work Needs
 Customers Quotes (136)
 Service Quotes (1027)
 Leadership Quotes (3223)
 Team Quotes (494)
 Make Quotes (281)
 Sell Quotes (1439)
 General Quotes (1037)
Property Needs
 Clothing Quotes (144)
 Home Quotes (151)
 Garden/Nature Quotes (964)
 Conservation Quotes (281)
 General Quotes (345)
Food Needs
 Food Quotes (205)
 Drink Quotes (226)
 General Quotes (529)
Friends Needs
 Friends Quotes (778)
 Partners Quotes (615)
 Children Quotes (1675)
 Love Quotes (792)
 Conversation Quotes (4576)
 General Quotes (8695)
Fun Needs
 Gratitude Quotes (1696)
 Satisfaction Quotes (958)
 Anticipation Quotes (1256)
 Experiences Quotes (626)
 Music Quotes (280)
 Books Quotes (1298)
 TV/movies Quotes (177)
 Art Quotes (654)
 General Quotes (2654)

 Imagi-Natives Search 
 
Quote/Topic  Author
Contains all words in any orderContains the exact phraseContains at least one word
[ 50 Item(s) displayed from page 67 ]


Previous<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  
27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  
52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67 68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  
77  78  79  80  81  Next Page>>

  Quotations - Invest  
[Quote No.44065] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The cardinal maxim [to avoid 'moral hazard' and the requirement of stopping excessive risk taking in an economy by credit institutions and the subsequent need for government to rescue them with public money when their speculation goes wrong] is, that any aid to a present bad Bank is the surest mode of preventing the establishment of a future good Bank [and sensible risk taking]." - Walter Bagehot
(1826-1877) British businessman, essayist, and journalist
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44066] Need Area: Money > Invest
"I can't remember the exact quote but when I used to trade and Mr. Volcker was Fed[eral Reserve] chairman, he said something like 'gold is my enemy, I'm always watching what gold is doing', we need to think why he made a statement like that. If you're a central banker or one of the [politicians] congressmen or senators, watch what gold is doing because this is a no-confidence vote in fiscal and [U.S.] dollar policy." - Rick Santelli
American on-air editor for the CNBC Business News network. Source: CNBC
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44067] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Some people regard [free market capitalism and] private enterprise as a predatory tiger to be shot. Others look on it as a cow they can milk. Not enough people see it as a healthy horse, pulling a sturdy wagon." - Winston Churchill
(1874-1965) Prime Minister of the United Kingdom
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44071] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Men [especially investors and speculators], it has been well said, think in herds; it will be seen [in share market bull and bear extremes for example] that they go mad in herds, while they only recover their senses slowly, and one by one." - Charles Mackay
(1814-1889) Scottish poet, journalist, author, anthologist, novelist, and songwriter. Source: 'Memoirs of Extraordinary Popular Delusions and the Madness of Crowds', 1841.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44073] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In the absence of the gold standard, there is no way to protect savings from confiscation through inflation. There is no safe store of value. If there were, the government would have to make its holding illegal, as was done in the case of gold. If everyone decided, for example, to convert all his bank deposits to silver or copper or any other good, and thereafter declined to accept checks as payment for goods, bank deposits would lose their purchasing power and government-created bank credit would be worthless as a claim on goods. The financial policy of the welfare state requires that there be no way for the owners of wealth to protect themselves. This is the shabby secret of the welfare statists' tirades against gold. Deficit spending is simply a scheme for the confiscation of wealth. Gold stands in the way of this insidious process. It stands as a protector of property rights." - Alan Greenspan
(1926 - ), Chairman of the Federal Reserve Board of Governors (1987-2006). Quote from 1966.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44074] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Share market, real estate and other financial and business] Panics do not destroy capital; they merely reveal the extent to which it has been previously destroyed by its betrayal [or malinvestment as the Austrian School of economists say] into hopelessly unproductive works." - John Stuart Mill
(1806-1873) English philosopher and economist. Quote from his 1868 paper 'On credit cycles and the origin of commercial panics'.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44077] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Is there any reason why the American people should be taxed [by politicians and governments] to guarantee the debts of banks [inducing more anti-free market capitalist 'moral hazard' where risky speculation's profit is privatised and losses socialised], any more than they should be taxed to guarantee the debts of other institutions, including the merchants, the industries, and the mills of the country?" - Senator Carter Glass
(1858-1946) Newspaper publisher, US Senator (D-VA), author of the Banking Act of 1933, U.S. Secretary of the Treasury under President Woodrow Wilson. Source: during Senate debate on the Banking Act of 1933 (Glass-Steagall Act) [source: Rixey Smith and Norman Beasley, Carter Glass: A Biography (1939)]. This act was repealed through the Gramm-Leach-Bliley Act in 1999 by President Bill Clinton. Many believe this allowed banks to allow consolidation and ramp up leverage and speculation with customers deposits that eventually brought about the 2007-9 Great Financial Crisis, also called 'The Great Recession' - second only to 'The Great Depression in economic severity, necessitating the government to again step in and save the banks from bankruptcy and the financial system from meltdown.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44078] Need Area: Money > Invest
"If you find yourself in a hole, stop digging." - Will Rogers
(1879-1935) American humorist
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44080] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Gentlemen, you are now about to embark on a course of studies that will form a noble adventure...let me make this clear to you...nothing that you will learn in the course of your studies will be of the slightest possible use to you in afterlife – save only this – that if you work hard and intelligently, you should be able to detect when a man is talking rot, and that, in my view, is the main, if not the sole purpose of education." - John Alexander Smith
(1863–1939), Idealist philosopher, who was the Jowett Lecturer of philosophy at Balliol College, Oxford from 1896 to 1910, and the Waynflete Professor of Moral and Metaphysical Philosophy, carrying a Fellowship at Magdalen College in the same university, from 1910 to 1936.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44083] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The funny thing about common sense is that it is not that common at all!" - Saying

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44091] Need Area: Money > Invest
"...the most basic human right, [is] the right to bargain in a free marketplace..." - Robert A. Heinlein
Science fiction writer. Quote from his winner of the Hugo award as the best science fiction novel of 1966, 'The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress'. Quote from the character Professor Bernardo de la Paz.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44093] Need Area: Money > Invest
"It's an old adage that the way to be safe is never to be secure. Each one of us requires the spur of insecurity [including competition] to force us to do our best." - Harold W. Dodds

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44112] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In bad fortune hold out, in good hold in!" - German Proverb

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44121] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Mental fight [for contrarian investors] means thinking against the current, not with it. It is our business to puncture gas bags and discover the seeds of truth." - Virginia Woolf

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44131] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Occurrences in this domain are beyond the reach of exact prediction because of the variety of factors in operation, not because of any lack of order in nature." - Albert Einstein

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44141] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The lowest ebb is the turn of the tide!" - Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44159] Need Area: Money > Invest
"It's darkest before the dawn." - Proverb

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44180] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Better shun the bait than struggle in the snare." - John Dryden

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44190] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Keynesian stimulus failed to work and resulted in a situation, the economist John Maynard Keynes said couldn't happen at the same time, namely high inflation and high unemployment, called 'stagflation'.] We used to think that you could just spend your way out of a recession and increase employment by cutting taxes and boosting government spending. I tell you, in all candour, that that option no longer exists and that in so far as it ever did exist, it only worked on each occasion since the war by injecting bigger doses of inflation into the economy, followed by higher levels of unemployment." - James Callaghan
British Labour politician who was Prime Minister of the United Kingdom (1976-79) and Leader of the Labour Party (1976-80). Quote from the 1976 Labour Party Conference, published in 'The Times', 29 September 1976.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44191] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The wavelike movement affecting the economic system, the recurrence of periods of boom which are followed by periods of depression [recession and bust], is the unavoidable outcome of the attempts repeated again and again, [to intervene in the economy by governments and central banks, as prescribed by Keynesian theory, in order] to lower the gross market rate of interest by means of credit expansion. There is no means of avoiding the final collapse of a boom [and malinvestment] brought about by credit expansion [that gives false price signals to market participants and temporarily distort asset valuations and the balance between demand and supply]. The alternative is only whether the crisis should come sooner as the result of a voluntary abandonment of further credit expansion, or later as a final and total catastrophe of the currency system involved. " - Ludwig von Mises
Austrian School economist. Quote from his book, 'Human Action', p. 572.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44204] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Poem: about trends]

A trend is a trend is a trend,
But the question is, will it bend?
Will it alter its course,
Through some unforeseen force,
And come to a premature end?

" - Sir Alec Cairncross

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44206] Need Area: Money > Invest
"There is no limit to the extent to which the Bank of Japan can increase the money supply if it wishes to do so. Higher monetary growth [of the money supply - so long as the velocity of money does not fall] will have the same effect as always. After a year or so, the economy will expand more rapidly; output will grow, and after another delay, inflation will increase moderately." - Milton Friedman
Famous economist. Quote from 1997 on the Bank of Japan's monetary policy following Japan's deflationary spiral of the early 1990s.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44235] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[The Law of Unintended Consequences:] No very deep knowledge of economics is usually needed for grasping the immediate effects of a measure; but the task of economics is to foretell the remoter effects, and so to allow us to avoid such acts as attempt to remedy a present ill by sowing the seeds of a much greater ill for the future." - Ludwig von Mises
Famous Austrian School economist
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44236] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[The Law of Unintended Consequences or 'That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Unseen':] In the economic sphere an act, a habit, an institution, a law produces not only one effect, but a series of effects. Of these effects, the first alone is immediate; it appears simultaneously with its cause; it is seen. The other effects emerge only subsequently; they are not seen; we are fortunate if we foresee them. There is only one difference between a bad economist and a good one: the bad economist confines himself to the visible effect; the good economist takes into account both the effect that can be seen and those effects that must be foreseen. Yet this difference is tremendous; for it almost always happens that when the immediate consequence is favorable, the later consequences are disastrous, and vice versa. Whence it follows that the bad economist pursues a small present good that will be followed by a great evil to come, while the good economist pursues a great good to come, at the risk of a small present evil." - Frédéric Bastiat
From his essay in 1850, 'That Which Is Seen and That Which Is Unseen'.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44246] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Inflation is taxation without representation!" - Milton Friedman
(1912-2006) Nobel Prize-winning economist and economic advisor to US President Ronald Reagan.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44265] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Have you ever heard people say 'don't sweat the details'? Well, they're wrong: sweat the details. They have a name for people who sweat the details: millionaires." - Jerry Bowyer

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44276] Need Area: Money > Invest
"When you're dying of thirst it's too late to think about digging a well!" - Japanese Proverb

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44330] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The opinion of 10,000 men [and women] is of no value if none of them know anything about the subject!" - Marcus Aurelius

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44348] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Statistics are only as good as the people who wield them." - Darryl Campbell

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44416] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Why Do Journalists Get Economics [and Politics] So Wrong? Over the years, I've heard many people gripe about the media. It's always so anti-free market and economically illiterate. When there is some favorable mention of markets, it's usually a trained economist or financial person. Insightful commentary from a journalist on economic matters is, sadly, a rare commodity. In my opinion, the root of the problem comes from the sort of person who wants to become a writer. As an analyst and a financial writer, I meet a lot of people who want to be writers. It's quite a strange aspiration. Personally, I enjoyed studying economics and finance and kept having ideas which I wanted to share with others. Hence, I started writing about them. A few twists and turns later, and here I am. The problem with journalism is that most journalists come from the exact opposite approach. They decided to write long before having any background knowledge to write about. The vast majority of college freshman enter their first journalism or English class without anything important to say on the matters of economics and politics. Despite their ignorance in the ways of the world, they still want to write about it anyway. Reflect for a second on what an odd concept that is. It's kind of like wanting to open an art gallery just so that you can sip wine with artsy people. Shouldn't the point be to use your art as medium to express an idea or emotion or something else significant? Call me biased, but I'm of the persuasion that one should know something about a topic before writing on it. Otherwise, writing is just screaming at a mountain to hear one's own voice. There's no point to it. Unfortunately, after four years of reading poetry and the classics, the young aspiring writer is no better prepared for his or her future role of commenting on economics, politics, and science. After college, you've got a very dangerous weapon on your hands - a person who can write persuasively but doesn't really know much about anything. It's quite irresponsible of colleges to let such people loose on society. These journalists aren't spending their waking hours studying economics to compose the best-informed articles. Instead, they'll just formulate some half-baked idea from the top of their heads with little background knowledge to defend their assertions. Their goal is not to become the most knowledgeable economist, physicist, or historian. It is not the search for truth or important ideas which motivates most. Their goal is simply to write - and the bigger publication, the better. With this as the inspiration for many writers, why are we surprised to see so many economically illiterate articles in the media?" - Vedran Vuk
Senior Analyst with the financial newsletter, the Casey Daily Dispatch, 7th September, 2012. [Refer www.Caseyresearch.com ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44444] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In a crisis, moral hazard concerns have to be put on one side, as central banks recognise in a financial crisis. The fire engine does not drive slowly to the fire to encourage others to be careful [especially if the fire department were the ones that irresponsibly gave the pyromaniacs the gasoline and matches, instead of pre-emptively removing the gasoline and matches before they endangered the whole neighborhood]." - Simon Wren-Lewis
Professor of Economics at Oxford University, commenting on the ECB - European Central Bank, in 2012.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44468] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Ultra Easy Money Today, Hard Times Tomorrow: --- When Bill White was the chief economist at the Bank of International Settlements (BIS) before he retired in 2008, he was referred to by the US Federal Reserve delegation with heavy irony as 'Merry Sunshine'. He was regarded as a dismal gadfly who had the temerity to challenge the banking orthodoxy of the day, as defined by then Fed chairman Alan Greenspan, known, without irony, as 'The Maestro'. The Swiss-based BIS is the world’s most exclusive club with a membership of 55 central bankers, including Australia’s Glenn Stevens. They meet every two months to discuss central bank concerns. From 1987 to 2006, Greenspan pretty well set the global agenda for monetary policy. The central tenet of his approach was that official interest rates could be significantly lower than the historical experience because inflation was no longer the risk it had been. The gospel of easy monetary policy was spread far and wide on the wings of globalisation and deregulation. Despite the dismissive treatment, White continued to issue warnings about the adverse economic implications of easy credit until he was proved, in a painful but convincing fashion, to be correct [with the thunderous crash of the 2007-9 'Great Recession']. The Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas, which is chaired by Richard Fisher, has published Bill White’s latest paper: 'Ultra Easy Monetary Policy and the Law of Unintended Consequences'. It doesn’t make for comfortable reading, but White’s record means it deserves attention. [http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/institute/wpapers/2012/0126.pdf ] His opening sentence sets the scene: 'The central banks of the advanced market economies (AMEs) have embarked upon one of the greatest economic experiments of all time – ultra easy monetary policy.' It’s White’s contention that the immediate response to the global recession of 2009 of lowering interest rates to stimulate demand was understandable and correct. However, it has only 'bought time' for other, non-monetary measures, to be brought to bear. This observation has relevance to Australia where successive rate cuts are having a smaller impact on demand than anticipated. There are, White says, limits to how much central banks can do without the risk of long-term consequences such as hyperinflation and deflation overwhelming the short-term benefits that have been achieved. White is no fan of traditional economic modelling, arguing that the economy should be treated as a complex, adaptive system. Such systems, built up as a result of cumulative processes, can have highly unpredictable dynamics and show significant non-linearities. He notes: 'The insights of George Soros, reflecting decades of active market participation, are of a similar nature.' [Refer his 'Theory of Reflexivity'] White makes the important point that John Maynard Keynes focused on how to extract the economy from a hole. The Austrian school spearheaded by Ludwig von Mises and Friedrich Hayek, on the other hand, focused on why the economy found itself in such a hole and how to avoid repeating such an outcome. On this latter point, White argues that cheap credit leads to wholesale mal-investment such as we saw in the housing bubbles in different economies. The US bubble, dismissed as a problem by Greenspan, corrupted financial markets and impoverished millions. White sees ultra easy monetary policy as being particularly pernicious for the financial sector, as threatening the health of financial institutions and the functioning of financial markets, which are increasingly intertwined. This provides a negative feedback loop to threaten growth. Further, White says, such monetary policies threaten the 'independence' of central banks and can encourage imprudent behaviour on behalf of governments. In effect, easy monetary policies can lead to 'moral hazard on a grand scale'. Once on such a path, 'exit' becomes extremely difficult. Also, monetary policy has distributional effects, favouring debtors over creditors and the senior management of banks in particular. White’s 'solution' is a normalising of interest rates, which would, among other consequences, have the effect of increasing the cost of servicing high levels of public debt. He concedes that Martin Wolf of the 'Financial Times', Richard Koo of Nomura and others are 'undoubtedly right' in suggesting that a debt-driven private sector collapse should normally be offset by public sector stimulus. 'What cannot be forgotten, however,' he says, 'is the suddenness with which market confidence can be lost.' What is obvious as you read White’s exposition of how easy money has fashioned the contemporary economy is that exiting from a period of ultra-easy monetary policy will not be easy. Central banks using the traditional models of output gaps will be reluctant to raise rates if growth appears sub-normal. If short-term rates are moved up, it’s quite possible that long-term rates will be under pressure and could even spike upwards, threatening financial stability. You can bet governments will resist higher rates. The idea that rates must be cut to stimulate an under-performing economy has become embedded in the political psyche. Higher interest rates would hit the public debt-servicing bill and the annual budget. And as White writes: 'Further on the basis of previous experience the entire financial community (with its formidable capacity for public communication and private lobbying) will oppose any tightening of policy as too dangerous.' In addressing the issue of exiting from the ultra easy monetary regime that defines the global economy, Bill White has ventured where others have not been prepared to go. The absence of alternative scenarios to those canvassed by him underlines just what an open-ended economic experiment we are engaged in." - Maximilian Walsh
Deputy chairman of Dixon Advisory and a former editor and managing editor of 'The Australian Financial Review'. Published in 'The Australian Financial Review', 6 Sep 2012. [http://afr.com/p/opinion/ultra_easy_money_today_hard_times_wHQJBAR2v5DurtVtHpeiyO ] [Refer Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas - Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute - Working Paper No. 126 - Ultra Easy Monetary Policy and the Law of Unintended Consequences - William R. White - August 2012 - http://www.dallasfed.org/assets/documents/institute/wpapers/2012/0126.pdf ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44469] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The beauty of gold is: It loves bad news." - John Updike
Author. Quote from Harry 'Rabbit' Angstrom, the central character in his novels about American suburban life, explaining his $11,000 purchase of 30 Kruggerrands (a South African-minted gold coin) to his wife.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44538] Need Area: Money > Invest
"One of the worst things that can happen to you in life is to win a bet on a horse at an early age [making you think gambling is easy and frequently successful]." - Danny Mcgoorty

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44560] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Technical chart investors who try to time the market, rather than fundamental investors who believe try to buy cheaply by understanding 'Reversion-to-the-long-term-mean', often quote Keynes:] The long run is a misleading guide to current affairs. In the long run we are all dead." - John Maynard Keynes
English economist, whose theories about the economy form the foundation of the Keynesian School of economics.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44616] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The Biderman Market Theory has two key elements. The first is that the house has an advantage in all markets over the players. Whether the stock market, any commodity market or even the corner market the house has an advantage over the rest of us. The second is all there is in the stock market is shares of stock [supply] and money [demand]. And the house in the US stock market has now turned very bearish. So far this September a towering $33.2 billion in new offerings have been sold, the most ever the first two weeks of any September. What is more, new offerings are three times buybacks and cash takeovers announced added together so far this month. Last but not least insiders have been selling about 11 times more shares than they are buying. The last time the sell buy ratio was this high was in April, right at the prior market peak. Why it particularly matters that the house is now bearish is that the house had been providing all of the new cash to the stock market for the past year and a half via float shrink. In essence, at its simplest, float shrink means more money chases fewer shares. The logical outcome of more money chasing fewer shares is rising stock prices. How that happens is companies give shareholders cash in exchange for shares. Since institutions control 80% of the float and institutions usually hold a constant cash percentage, float shrink creates automatic buying of the rest of the market by the amount of the float shrink. What is going on now [17th September, 2012] is float growth. Float growth means institutions have to sell existing holdings to raise the cash to buy newly created shares. That translates into less money chasing more shares. And stock prices should go down. That is what happened this past April. Will stock prices roll over and sell off soon? Who knows." - Charles Biderman
President and CEO TrimTabs Investment Research; Portfolio Manager, TrimTabs Float Shrink ETF (TTFS). [http://trimtabs.com/blog/2012/09/17/is-20-pop-stocks-most-we-can-expect-from-current-fed-easing/?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+TrimtabsMoneyBlog+%28TrimTabs+Money+Blog%29 ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44635] Need Area: Money > Invest
"It is absolutely necessary to constantly be questioning your own views!" - David Rosenberg
chief economist at Toronto-based money manager Gluskin Sheff + Associates.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44636] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[During a recession the central bank will lower interest rates in order to increase consumer and business disposable income until the share market leading the economy starts to rise again.] Another transmission mechanism that can result in low interest rates producing higher stock prices is financial engineering. This can take several forms. In the simplest case, a corporation can simply refinance its debt at a lower interest rate and thereby reduce its interest expense and increase its earnings. Coca-Cola (KO) appears to have done this successfully. It is probably not a very important factor today [2012] because of low debt levels of most industrial companies but it is certainly a positive factor. Another form that financial engineering can take is a debt financed share repurchase [buyback]- essentially replacing equity on the balance sheet with debt or engaging in 'capital structure substitution.' As long as the company's stock is trading at a P/E less than the inverse of the after tax cost of the debt, this transaction will have the effect of increasing earnings per share. Thus, if a company borrows at 6% and has a 35% tax rate, its after tax interest expense is less than 4% and it will increase per share earnings as long as it buys its own stock for a price less than 25 times earnings. It is not surprising that each quarter we seem to set a new record for share repurchases; it also may explain why earnings 'per share' keep increasing even though total revenue is sluggish." - Phil Mause
Senior Advisor with the Pacific Economics Group. [http://seekingalpha.com/article/873371-interest-rates-and-equity-valuations-deconstructing-the-fed-model ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44644] Need Area: Money > Invest
"When there is much desire to learn, there of necessity will be much arguing, much writing, many opinions; for opinion in good men is but knowledge in the making!" - John Milton
(1608 - 1674) Poet
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44709] Need Area: Money > Invest
"To combat [an economic] depression by a forced credit expansion is to attempt to cure the evil by the very means which brought it about; because we are suffering from a misdirection of production, we want to create further misdirection - a procedure which can only lead to a much more severe crisis as soon as the credit expansion comes to an end." - Friedrich August von Hayek
(1899-1992), Nobel Laureate of Economic Sciences 1974. Quote from 1933.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44765] Need Area: Money > Invest
"To hazard much to get much has more of avarice than wisdom." - William Penn

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44786] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Now in 2012 is an example of when Austrian School of economics pre-emptive monetary discipline having been ignored can't be rectified by Keynesian stimulus - government increasing aggregate demand by borrowing and spending more and central banks lowering interest rates to make borrowing for the government, business and the consumer more affordable - as government debt to GDP and consumer debt to assets and debt service costs to income are too high, necessitating another approach - either saving more to build up assets or inflation and 'financial repression' to increase asset prices and reduce the real cost of debt:] Macro Malpractice - The wrong medicine is being applied to America’s economy. Having misdiagnosed the ailment, policymakers have prescribed untested experimental medicine with potentially grave side effects. The patient is the American consumer – the world’s biggest by far, but now in the throes of the worst funk since the Great Depression. Recent data on consumer spending in the United States have been terrible. Growth in inflation-adjusted US personal consumption expenditures has just been revised down to 1.5% in the second quarter of 2012, and appears to be on track for a similarly anemic increase in the third quarter. Worse, these numbers are just the latest in what has now been a four-and-a-half-year-old trend [since the start of The Great Recession, sometimes called the Great Financial Crisis]. From the first quarter of 2008 through the second quarter of 2012, annualized growth in real consumption spending has averaged a mere 0.7% – all the more extraordinary when compared with the pre-crisis trend of 3.6% in the decade ending in 2007. The disease is a protracted balance-sheet recession that has turned a generation of America’s consumers into zombies – the economic walking dead. Think Japan, and its corporate zombies of the 1990’s. Just as they wrote the script for the first of Japan’s lost decades, their counterparts are now doing the same for the US economy. Two bubbles – property and credit – enabled a decade of excessive consumption. Since their collapse in 2007, US households have understandably become fixated on repairing the damage. That means paying down debt and rebuilding savings, leaving consumer demand mired in protracted weakness. Yet the treatment prescribed for this malady has compounded the problem. Steeped in denial, the Federal Reserve [with its Chairman Ben Bernanke] is treating the disease as a cyclical problem – deploying the full force of monetary accommodation [lower interest rates and increased liquidity] to compensate for what it believes to be a temporary shortfall in aggregate demand. The convoluted logic behind this strategy is quite disturbing – not only for the US, but also for the global economy. There is nothing cyclical about the lasting aftershocks of a balance-sheet recession that have now been evident for nearly five years. Indeed, balance-sheet repair has barely begun for US households. The personal-saving rate stood at just 3.7% in August 2012 – up from the 1.5% low of 2005, but half the 7.5% average recorded in the last three decades of the twentieth century. Moreover, the debt overhang remains massive. The overall level of household indebtedness stood at 113% of disposable personal income in mid-2012 – down 21 percentage points from its pre-crisis peak of 134% in 2007 [much of this from bankruptcy rather than saving], but still well above the 1970-1999 norm of around 75%. In other words, Americans have much farther to go on the road to balance-sheet repair – which hardly suggests a temporary, or cyclical, shortfall in consumer demand. Moreover, the Fed’s approach is severely compromised by the so-called zero bound on interest rates. Having run out of basis points to cut from interest rates, the Fed has turned to the quantity dimension of the credit cycle – injecting massive doses of liquidity into the collapsed veins of zombie consumers [or more accurately, since banks are not lending to most consumers as their assets, collateral, job security, pay and wages especially increases in these and current interest rates don't justify the risk, into the hands of Zombie banks and financial institutions holding huge financial asset losses in Mortgage Backed Securities - MBSs, which are using the increased liquidity to speculate and thereby reflate share markets but not real estate markets]. To [at least try to] rationalize the efficacy of this approach, the Fed has rewritten the script on the transmission mechanism of discretionary monetary policy. Unlike the days of yore, when cutting the price of credit could boost borrowing [when people had surplus equity in assets they could still use as collateral once interest rates had lowered after inflation had been curbed], 'quantitative easing' [or 'money printing'] purportedly works by stimulating asset and credit markets [inflation in speculative, risky assets - often valued using long-term interest rates with the discounted future cah flow methodology]. The wealth effects generated by frothy financial markets are then presumed to rejuvenate long-dormant 'animal spirits' and get consumers spending again, irrespective of lingering balance-sheet strains. There is more: Once the demand problem is cured, according to this argument, companies will start hiring again [so long as needed productivity increases can't be obtained from capital investments in technology or overseas plants where labor costs are lower and current employees don't recoup all the additional surplus in higher wage claims]. And then, presto – an unconventional fix magically satisfies the Fed’s long-neglected mandate to fight unemployment. But the Fed’s policy gambit has taken the US down the wrong road. Indeed, the Fed has doubled down on an approach aimed at recreating the madness of an asset [speculation] - and credit [debt]-dependent consumption model – precisely the mistake that pushed the US economy toward the abyss in 2003-2006. Just as two previous rounds of quantitative easing failed to accelerate US households’ balance-sheet repair, there is little reason to believe that 'QE3' [quantitative Easing version three] will do the trick. Quantitative easing is a blunt instrument, at best, and operates through highly circuitous – and thus dubious – channels. Significantly, it does next to nothing to alleviate the twin problems of excess leverage and inadequate saving [except nominally by raising asset prices and reducing real wages - and therefore living standards - through inflation and financial repression where interest rates are deliberately kept below the real inflation rate]. Policies aimed directly at debt forgiveness [and free market capitalism's cxreative destruction and bankruptcy for bad investment skill] and enhanced saving incentives [like higher interest rates and lowered tax rates] – contentious, to be sure – would at least address zombie consumers’ balance-sheet problems. Moreover, the side effects of quantitative easing are significant [including punishing sensible saving and rewarding reckless borrowing, incompetent business management and unskilled risk-averse investing and the damage done to the credibilitiy of the political ideology of capitalism, government management, Reserve Bank policy credibility and the upholding of human rights to the unalienable right to freedom from force, coercion and fraud]. Many worry about an upsurge in inflation [especially commodity inflation as these are denominated in USD dollars which are depreciating as a consequence of money printing - quantitative easing], though, given the outsize slack in the global economy [low capacity utilisation figures and therefore low pricing power] – and the likelihood that it will persist for years to come – that is not high on my watch list. Far more disconcerting is the willingness of major central banks – not just the Fed, but also the European Central Bank, the Bank of England, and the Bank of Japan – to inject massive amounts of excess liquidity into asset markets – excesses that cannot be absorbed by sluggish real economies [as seen by falling velocity of money figures which also suggest inflation will be low]. That puts central banks in the destabilizing position of abdicating control over financial markets. For a world beset by seemingly endemic financial instability, this could prove to be the most destructive development of all. The developing world is up in arms over the major central banks’ reckless tactics. Emerging economies’ leaders fear spillover effects in commodity markets [as these rise due to depreciating US dollar] and distortions of exchange rates [as these rise in relation to US dollar depreciation unless pegged making their export markets uncompetitive] and capital flows [from the carry trade where cheap loans in US dollars are invested in countries with higher population growth rates and therefore need to have higher economic growth rates to provide jobs for their populations to keep economic and social stability] that may compromise their own focus on financial stability [with difficult to manage 'hot money' in and out-flows, raise inflation - especially food inflation as this forms a bigger percentage of these developing nations' citizens' spending, etc]. While it is difficult to track the cross-border flows fueled by quantitative easing in the so-called advanced world, these fears are far from groundless. Liquidity injections into a zero-interest-rate developed world send return-starved investors scrambling for growth opportunities elsewhere. As the global economy has gone from crisis to crisis in recent years, the cure [monetary policy] has become part of the disease [excessively low rates, financial speculation and excessive debt, etc]. In an era of zero interest rates and quantitative easing, macroeconomic policy has become unhinged from a tough post-crisis reality. Untested medicine is being used to treat the wrong ailment – and the chronically ill patient continues to be neglected." - Stephen S. Roach
He was Chairman of Morgan Stanley Asia and the firm's Chief Economist, and currently is a senior fellow at Yale University’s Jackson Institute of Global Affairs and a senior lecturer at Yale’s School of Management. Quote from his Project Syndicate article Macro Malpractice, published 30th September, 2012. [http://www.project-syndicate.org/commentary/federal-reserve-quantitative-easing-ecb-emerging-economies-by-stephen-s--roach ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44793] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In economics, things take longer to happen than you think they will, and then they happen faster than you thought they could." - Rudiger Dornbusch
(1942 – 2002), German economist who worked for most of his career in the United States. Throughout his career his main focus was on international economics, especially monetary policy, macroeconomic development, growth and international trade. According to some of his students and associates his talent was to extract the heart of a problem and make it understandable in simple terms. For example, he explained fluctuations in prices and exchange rates with great clarity (notably with his Overshooting Model). He worked also for the International Monetary Fund, making controversial contributions to the development of stabilisation policies, especially for Latin American countries.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44812] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Panics [share market, etc., busts] do not destroy capital; they merely reveal the extent to which it has been previously destroyed by its betrayal into hopelessly unproductive works [often called booms at the time and later 'fads' ]." - John Stuart Mill
in 1867
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44813] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Markets are fundamentally volatile. No way around it. Your problem is not in the math. There is no math to get you out of having to experience uncertainty." - Ed Seykota

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44844] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Share traders often say timing is more important than stock picking. An important indicator for the share market's long-term cycle is monthly revisions to analyst earnings projections:] This means that the time to start turning more optimistic is when these earnings estimates estimates bottom out – ie. the downgrading process comes to an end. Now at the profit cycle peaks, the analysts are typically about 20% too bullish on their earnings estimates for the coming twelve months, which would then mean [today in late 2012] a trough somewhere around $80 EPS this time around – if past is prescient. So this is a level I would be looking for before sounding the all clear that a lot of the 'bad economic' news is priced in. In any event, I always say that there is no alarm bell that rings at the lows of the highs but this seems like a metric we can fall back on at some point to turn more bullish and add more significantly to equity market exposure. It worked like a charm in March 2009 (though admittedly it would have got us into the market too early in 2002... but by mid-2003 the patience would certainly have paid off)." - David Rosenberg
Respected analyst with Gluskin Sheff, who writes the 'Breakfast with Dave' daily economic and share market report.
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44846] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Anyone who lends to another, including a government or company through buying their bonds should remember:] Lying rides upon debt's back." - Benjamin Franklin

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44847] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Res tantum valet quantum vendi potest. [A thing is worth only what someone else will pay for it]." - Oskar Morgenstern

Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44896] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Relative sector performance just after share market tops and bottoms. In 2007 at top:] Global equity market sector and group rotation has moved in a maximum defensive direction. The games that investors were playing with materials, autos and other cyclical groups appear to be over. Now...economically sensitive sectors [the so-called 'cyclical' sectors] seem to be in the crosshairs for liquidation...Credit market disruption is now spreading again into junk bond and emerging market spreads - it looks like the next wave of credit convulsion is starting. This should accentuate the downward pressure on the US and global economies. Over-owned global cyclical plays have become good shorting prospects. Disappointing news on the revenue and earnings front should soon surface. The top three S&P outperform sector prospects are [the 'non-cyclical' sectors of] consumer staples, utilities and health care. These are strong, early signals (mostly relative to the index, not absolute). So they are simply hideouts for long-only funds, or potentially the long side of long/short pair trades for hedge funds...[In 2009 at bottom] This scenario is consistent with the model forecast. Stock indexes are supposed to rally, defensive issues are supposed to underperform, financials and some cyclicals are supposed to outperform and stocks are supposed to outperform bonds. Large portfolio managers who are parked in cash and defensive positions are likely to get squeezed. A forthcoming asset allocation shift out of bonds into global equities should support stock indexes... New Bull Market? The essential question for the big money institutions waiting to dive into stocks is: Is this the start of a new bull market or just a bounce in a longer-term bear market? While it is too early to be absolutely certain, the pendulumis starting to shift toward the new bull market scenario. The strongest evidence comes from the long-term model forecast (12 month) and the 200 month moving average for global stock indexes. Most indexes recently fell below their 200 month averages for the first time in years (in some cases decades). But the recent recovery is lifting indexes back toward (or above in the case of the DAX) their 200 month averages. So this could potentially become simply a classic bounce near an ultra-long-term (16 year) moving average. In other words, a big dip in the long-term uptrend. The long-term model forecast (12 month) is now moving in agreement with that thesis. The advance during March and April has flipped the long-term stock index forecast from down to up. This model turned negative in August-December 2007 (depending on index). With the 12-month forecast now turning up, a sustained market rise is likely. Bull Market or Not, Too Much Upside Potential to Miss: From a trend analysis perspective, stock indexes have some hoops to go through to verify a continued uptrend. These are: The 200 day average and the 200 week average. Currently, most stock indexes are about 8 - 10% below their 200 day averages and about 38% - 45% below their 200 week averages (with great variation). These levels are our current two-stage upside targets for stock indexes. The essential point is stock indexes could rally by 10% to 40%. Whether you call it a bear market bounce or a new bull market, is irrelevant -- it should be too much upside potential to miss. So big institutions will probably get squeezed out of defensive positions back into the market while the Fed blows another recovery bubble. With this scenario in mind, we recommend taking advantage of brief market pullbacks (like today’s) to establish long positions in global stock indexes and there commended sectors and groups." - Michael Belkin
From his 'Belkin Report', 2007 and 2009. [http://www.scribd.com/doc/109740679/Michael-Belkin ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.44897] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Trend analysis (not model forecast) provides intermediate-term and long-term support levels that become downside targets in bear markets. We use 200 week [1000 day] and 200 month [4000 day] averages. That approach was derived from studies of the DJIA (as far back as recorded data exists). The general pattern is for the DJIA to rise during a business cycle expansion and decline during a business cycle contraction -- usually to the vicinity of its 200 week average. That is during a ‘normal’ business cycle. Then there are bigger cycles. The DJIA has declined to its 200 month average during three major periods in thepast 100 years -- early 1920’s (post WW1), 1930’s (great depression) and 1970’s (stagflation era). Another example of a 200 month average retracement is the Nikkei -- which reached its 200 month average in 1995 (5 years after its bear market started) -- and has remained below its 200 month average most of the time since 1997. Note all these examples were accompanied by severe economic stress." - Michael Belkin
From his 'Belkin Report', 2007. [http://www.scribd.com/doc/109740679/Michael-Belkin ]
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
Start Searching Amazon for Gifts
Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

Previous<<  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16  17  18  19  20  21  22  23  24  25  26  
27  28  29  30  31  32  33  34  35  36  37  38  39  40  41  42  43  44  45  46  47  48  49  50  51  
52  53  54  55  56  57  58  59  60  61  62  63  64  65  66  67 68  69  70  71  72  73  74  75  76  
77  78  79  80  81  Next Page>>

 
Imagi-Natives'
Self-Defence
& Fitness Training

because
Everyone deserves
to be
Healthy and Safe!
Ideal for Anyone's Personal Protection Needs
Simple, Fast, Effective!
Maximum Safety - Minimum Force
No Punches, Kicks, Chokes, Pressure Points or Weapons Used
Based on Shaolin Chin-Na Seize and Control Methods
Comprehensively Covers Over 130 Types of Attack
Lavishly Illustrated With Over 1300 illustrations
Accredited Training for Australian Security Qualifications
National Quality Council Approved