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  Quotations - Invest  
[Quote No.59546] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Safety first:] The most important thing for me is that defense is 10 times more important than offense . . . You have to be very focused on the downside at all times." - Paul Tudor Jones
Billionaire investor
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[Quote No.59547] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Safety first: The first question he asks when considering a new business is:] What's my downside and how can I protect it." - Richard Branson
Billionaire investor
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[Quote No.59548] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Safety first:] If we avoid the losers, the winners take care of themselves." - Howard Marks
billionaire fund manager
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[Quote No.59553] Need Area: Money > Invest
"It's not enough for a business to be great. You need to buy this great business at a great price." - Phil Town
Author of the book, 'Rule #1: The Simple Strategy for Successful Investing in Only 15 Minutes a Week!'
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[Quote No.59621] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Investing is a popularity contest, and the most dangerous thing is to buy something at the peak of its popularity [and demand]." - Howard Marks

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[Quote No.59622] Need Area: Money > Invest
"For investing to be reliably successful, an accurate estimate of intrinsic value [fundamental business rather than speculative stock value] is the indispensable starting point. Without it, any hope for consistent success as an investor is just that: hope." - Howard Marks

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[Quote No.59623] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Good investing is boring [because the company's competitive position and underlying business are so predictable]." - George Soros

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[Quote No.59624] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Our job is to find a few intelligent things to do, not to keep up with every damn thing in the world." - Charlie Munger

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[Quote No.59629] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Circumstances may cause interruptions and delay, but never lose sight of your goal. Prepare yourself in every way you can by increasing your knowledge and adding to your experience, so you can make the most of the opportunity when it occurs!" - Mario Andretti

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[Quote No.59656] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In finance, the capital structure substitution theory (CSS) describes the relationship between earnings, stock price and capital structure of public companies. The CSS theory hypothesizes that managements of public companies manipulate capital structure such that earnings per share (EPS) are maximized. Managements have an incentive to do so because shareholders and analysts value EPS growth. The theory is used to explain trends in capital structure, stock market valuation, dividend policy, the monetary transmission mechanism, and stock volatility, and provides an alternative to the Modigliani–Miller theorem that has limited descriptive validity in real markets. The CSS theory is only applicable in markets where share repurchases are allowed. Investors can use the CSS theory to identify undervalued stocks. [The theory explains the so called 'Fed Model' of comparing earning yields of companies to bonds to determine if they are over or under valued and the use of monetary-interest policy to boost or restrict the 'animal spirits' - exuberance - of the stock market.] " - wikipedia.org
[Refer https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capital_structure_substitution_theory ]
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[Quote No.59706] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Dramatic changes in loans and interest rates have always created both economic and market booms and busts. The so-called Great Depression starting in 1929 and the Great Recession starting in 2008 were examples of that. For example, during the first three years of the Great Depression, loans outstanding collapsed by an astonishing 20 percent (as compared to 3 percent in the Great Recession of 2008). It was that collapse that turned a panic into a grueling, long-term depression with almost 25 percent unemployment. One of the chief culprits of the loan collapse was the three-to-five-year mortgage. There were no 20 to 30 year mortgages, and most borrowers were at the mercy of their lenders to renew their loans every three to five years. After the Crash of 1929, that stopped happening. In the wake of that collapse, the federal government invented a new type of mortgage -- the 20 year, amortizing mortgage:] ... During the freewheeling years of the 1920s, capital may have seemed to flow too freely, but the easy credit was not limited to consumer goods. During this period, mutual savings banks and building and loan societies lent huge sums to the growing urban population as well. But these home mortgages were not what we today consider traditional mortgages. Balloon mortgages dominated urban lending. In these 'balloon notes,' the principal was paid back in whole or in part at the end of the loan term and whatever difference remained had to be refinanced. The average length of a mortgage was three to five years, and was not amortized. Amortized loans -- that is, loans where the borrower pays down both the principal of the loan as well as the interest on the loan every month so that the payments are roughly equal -- existed, but during the boom years, interest-only loans meant home buyers could borrow more money. Borrowers hoped to pay it off quickly, or to sell and reap a profit. Most borrowers, however, rolled over the mortgage every few years. The bank, if it chose to, could renew the mortgage and keep the borrower in a state of what the later chairman of the Federal Home Loan Bank Board, John Fahey, called 'more or less permanent indebtedness.' ... In 1924, the McFadden Act allowed commercial banks to write mortgages for only five years -- up from one year in 1916. State banks had only 16 percent of their assets in mortgages and this accounted for 95 percent of all commercial bank ownership of mortgage loans. Home mortgages were dominated by small lending institutions. When the short-term mortgages came due after the stock market crash, investors, recognizing an increasing risk, refused to renew borrowers' loans. Nervous investors and prudent banks everywhere increasingly withdrew their capital from the mortgage market, making it more expensive and difficult for borrowers to renew their mortgages. Many smaller banks funded their mortgages by issuing bonds, called participation certificates, to local investors. As investors refused to reinvest in these bonds, banks had no choice but to refuse to refinance balloon mortgage holders. Available mortgage funds dropped precipitously in 1929. For borrowers, when a single lender chooses not ... to renew, it is inconvenient; when all lenders choose not to renew for structural reasons, it is a calamity. Borrowers unable to pay off the principal on their balloon mortgages faced foreclosures. Foreclosures during the Depression resulted as much from the drop in home owner's income as from the withdrawal of short-term mortgage funds from the market, making refinance impossible. By 1933 the mortgage market was effectively dead, and with it the housing industry. Without mortgages, the housing industry collapsed. Housing investment fell from $68 billion in 1929 to $17.6 billion in 1932. By 1934, the construction industry, as a whole, was one-tenth the size it had been in the late 1920s. Wage earners from a third of the families on relief were employed in construction. Indirectly, the collapse of the housing industry hit other sectors of the economy as well. Construction also had tremendous linkages to other sectors of the economy to a much greater extent than most industries. Ten percent of American factories manufactured building materials for construction. Twenty percent of freight cars carried those materials across the country. Unskilled labor carried material. Skilled labor put it together. Metal and wood of all shapes and types were needed for almost any project. Muscle and machine were needed alike. Clearly, restoring the economy turned on restoring the construction industry. What was less certain was how to bring about new construction. New Deal policymakers focused on the housing industry in their efforts to restart the economy because it had fallen so hard and so fast. ... In 1932 and 1933, lenders foreclosed on half a million homes." - Louis Hyman
Quote from his book, 'Debtor Nation: The History of America in Red Ink', published 2011, pages 47-50.
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[Quote No.59725] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The four most dangerous words in investing are, it's different this time." - John Templeton

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[Quote No.59729] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Fundamental, value investing:] Prices fluctuate more than values – so therein lies opportunity. Why do prices fluctuate so widely when values can't possibly? The answer is I don't know and I don't care. I just want to take advantage of it." - Joel Greenblatt
Highly successful investor
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[Quote No.59730] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Fundamental, value investing:] I try to buy shares of unpopular companies when they look like road kill, and sell them when they've been polished up a bit. I...seek value amid the refuse." - Michael Burry

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[Quote No.59731] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Fundamental, value investing:] I look at companies as businesses, while Wall Street analysts look for quarterly earnings performance. Some people get rich studying artificial intelligence. Me, I make my money studying natural stupidity [where financial price and value diverge]. If the system weren't so messed up, guys like me wouldn't make this kind of money." - Carl Icahn
Highly successful investor
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[Quote No.59772] Need Area: Money > Invest
"All courses of action are risky, so prudence is not in avoiding danger, but calculating risk and acting decisively." - Niccolo Machiavelli
From his book, 'The Prince'.
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[Quote No.59814] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Share market booms and busts are determined by credit expansion and the quality of collateral:] The boom cannot continue indefinitely. There are two alternatives. Either the banks continue the credit expansion without restriction and thus cause constantly mounting price increases and an ever-growing orgy of speculation – which, as in all other cases of unlimited inflation, ends in a 'crack-up boom' and in a collapse of the money and credit system. Or the banks stop before this point is reached, voluntarily renounce further credit expansion, and thus bring about the crisis. The depression follows in both instances." - Ludwig von Mises
the great Austrian economist
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[Quote No.59829] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Fundamental, value investing with an eye to growth or in other words, GARP: Growth At Reasonable Prices: ... Charlie] Munger turned [Warren] Buffett from being a one-dimensional to a three-dimensional investor. The two dimensions he introduced are quality and growth. A statistical value investor does not even have to be good at math - the counting skills you acquired in kindergarten are enough. As long as the P/E of the stock you want to buy doesn't exceed the number of digits you have on two hands, you are a Ben Graham value investor. But as Munger pointed out, this one-dimensional strategy is not scalable. You have only a very few opportunities in your lifetime to assemble a portfolio of (in-your-face) statistically cheap stocks that are decent businesses. All other times, you'll end up owning a lot of melting ice cubes. The quality and growth dimensions may lack in-your-face tangibility - they are often more difficult to quantify - but are very important sources of value. Let's look at quality. A high-quality, mature company that is barely growing earnings (think Coca-Cola) is like an inflation-protected bond. This company dominates its industry, and its existing (key word) business generates a high return on capital; but it cannot put this capital to work at these high rates because it already has a large market share in an industry with GDP-like growth. As an investor you'll collect dividends that will grow with inflation. You'll make or lose money on the stock price depending on the pendulum swing of price to earnings around the fair (par) value (which will also appreciate in line with inflation). From today's [2016] perch, in a world where investors are starved for yield, mature high-quality businesses trade like very, very expensive bond substitutes — their P/E pendulum puts their valuation much above par. Growth is a tricky dimension. On a stand-alone basis it means very little and can often be dangerous. A company that grew earnings at a fast pace in the past but lacked a sustainable competitive advantage (a bedrock of quality) will invite competition that will destroy current and future profitability. When you combine growth with quality, however, the mixture is magical and will result in a lot of value (think Apple). This value lies in future earnings. Another way to say the same thing is: A HIGH-QUALITY COMPANY WITH A HIGH RETURN ON CAPITAL [ROC] MARRIED TO A SIGNIFICANT GROWTH RUNWAY — THE ABILITY TO REINVEST AT A HIGH RATE IN THE FUTURE — will create significant value, which will not be observable in last year's or even next year's earning power but years from now. Think about some of Buffett's best investments: American Express and Geico. Both had significant competitive advantages. In the case of Geico, it sold directly to consumers and thus was a low-cost producer in a commodity industry. American Express simply had an unassailable brand. Both had a huge growth runway ahead when Buffett purchased them." - Vitaliy Katsenelson
CFA and Chief Investment Officer at Investment Management Associates in Denver, Colorado. He is the author of 'Active Value Investing' and 'The Little Book of Sideways Markets'. Quote from an article published July 24, 2016. [Refer http://imausa.com/values-value-investing/ ]
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[Quote No.59847] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The young man knows the rules, but the old man knows the exceptions [especially in investing]." - Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

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[Quote No.59860] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Leaving the question of price aside, the best business to own is one that over an extended period can employ large amounts of incremental capital at very high rates of return." - Warren Buffett
Berkshire Hathaway shareholder letter 1992.
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[Quote No.59890] Need Area: Money > Invest
"If history is a guide, we warn investors that restaurant industry sales tend to be the 'canary that lays the recessionary egg.' [Such declines have preceded the three most recent recessions!] " - Paul Westra
an analyst with St. Louis-based Stifel Financial [http://www.stltoday.com/business/columns/jim-gallagher/need-we-fear-a-new-recession/article_555e8545-b238-5375-b5a4-1e69f746ca45.html ]
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[Quote No.59939] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Riches do not exhilarate us so much with their [creation and] possession as they torment us with their loss." - Epicurus

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[Quote No.60119] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Most of economics [politics, psychology and sociology] can be summarized in four words: 'People respond to incentives.' The rest is commentary." - Steven Landsburg

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[Quote No.60198] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Central Banks' extraordinary monetary policies, from quantitative easing to negative interest rates and their effect on different stakeholders in the economy and the Austrian theories about too low interest rates blowing share market and bond bubbles as well as giving false price signals to businesses, families and government:] Well, clearly there are different responses to negative rates. If you're a saver, they're very difficult to deal with and to accept, although typically they go along with quite decent equity prices [with dramatic price rises being justified by using the so-called Fed Discounted Cash Flow Pricing Model where the now tiny interest rates hardly discount the expected future cash flows, so risky shares appear to have greater value relative to safe government bonds with their tiny rates]. But we consider all that and we have to make trade-offs in economics all the time and the idea is the lower the interest rate the better it is for investors [and debtors]. " - Stanley Fischer
US Federal Reserve Vice Chairman. Quote from his interview on Bloomberg TV with Tom Keene, 30th August, 2016. [http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-08-30/stanley-fischers-bizarre-justification-negative-rates and http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-08-30/fed-s-fischer-says-negative-rates-seem-to-work-in-today-s-world ]
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[Quote No.60199] Need Area: Money > Invest
"...investing with ignorance will often pay off... It's equivalent to running red lights to get home quicker. If you're lucky then you will certainly be home sooner. But the alternative isn't worth the risk. " - Alan Hull
Weekly 'Blue Chip Report' writer - refer www.alanhull.com
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[Quote No.60234] Need Area: Money > Invest
"It bears emphasis that not a single post war recession was a predicted a year in advance by the Fed, the Federal government, the IMF or a consensus of forecasters. Most were not recognized till long after they started. And if history teaches anything it is that financial interconnections are pervasive and not apparent till it's too late. Russia's 1998 default, problems in subprime lending, and the Asian financial crisis were all moments when financial dislocations had far more pervasive effects than was generally expected." - Larry Summers
American economist, professor and United States Secretary of the Treasury from 1999 to 2001. [http://larrysummers.com/2015/09/09/why-the-fed-must-stand-still-on-rates/ ]
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[Quote No.60275] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The risk premium is defined as the long-term excess return on risk assets over the risk-free rate of return. The risk premium has varied over time and is not the same for all asset classes. To complicate matters further, when talking about the risk-free rate of return, some use yields at the very short end, whereas others use longer-dated government bond yields. However, for the sake of simplicity, let's assume that we only talk about the equity risk premium, and let's also assume that policy rates (such as the Fed funds rate) are akin to the risk-free rate of return. On that basis, it would be fair to say that the risk premium over the past century (on average) has been around 4-5%. Consequently, one shouldn't really be surprised that equity returns at the moment are quite subdued, and one shouldn't be surprised at all, if that continues to be the case, as long as the risk-free rate of return remains close to 0%." - Niels Jensen
Absolute Return Partners, 1st September 2016. [http://arpinvestments.profundcom.net/dms/download/152322619211540_The_Absolute_Return_Letter_0916.pdf ]
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[Quote No.60295] Need Area: Money > Invest
"In a fair gale every fool may sail, but wise behavior in a storm commends the wisdom of a pilot." - Francis Quarles

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[Quote No.60377] Need Area: Money > Invest
"History teaches us that an economy that runs too hot for too long [because interest rates are too low for too long, for example,] can generate imbalances, potentially leading to excessive inflation, asset [and share] market bubbles, and ultimately economic correction and recession. A gradual process of raising rates reduces the risks of such an outcome." - John Williams
San Francisco Federal Reserve Bank President. [https://mishtalk.com/2016/09/12/down-the-rabbit-hole-sf-fed-president-john-williams-seeks-direct-attack-on-low-inflation/ ]
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[Quote No.60378] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Reserve Bank - Central Bank interest rates and inflation targets in times of 'deflation':] Asset Deflation Not CPI Deflation! It's asset deflation not CPI deflation that central banks ought to fear. Even the BIS [Bank of International Settlements] agrees with that statement. For discussion please see Historical Perspective on CPI Deflations: How Damaging are They? [https://mishtalk.com/2015/03/30/historical-perspective-on-cpi-deflations-how-damaging-are-they/ ] Economic Challenge to Keynesians: Of all the widely believed but patently false economic beliefs is the absurd notion that falling consumer prices are bad for the economy and something must be done about them. I have commented on this many times and have been vindicated not only by sound economic theory but also by actual historical examples. My January 20, 2015 post Deflation Bonanza! (And the Fool's Mission to Stop It) [https://mishtalk.com/2015/01/20/deflation-bonanza-and-the-fools-mission-to-stop-it/ ] has a good synopsis. And my Challenge to Keynesians 'Prove Rising Prices Provide an Overall Economic Benefit' [https://mishtalk.com/2014/10/19/challenge-to-keynesians-prove-rising-prices-provide-an-overall-economic-benefit/ ] has gone unanswered. In their attempts to fight routine consumer price deflation, central bankers create very destructive asset bubbles that eventually collapse, setting off what they should fear – asset bubble deflations following a buildup of bank credit on inflated assets [i.e. housing loans on inflated house values becoming higher than the value of the house when the house value falls leaving the banks with loan values that need to be adjusted down which would then make the banks insolvent and bankrupt - unable to trade as viable companies any longer]." - Mike 'Mish' Shedlock
Mike 'Mish' Shedlock is a registered investment advisor representative for SitkaPacific Capital Management. [https://mishtalk.com/2016/09/12/down-the-rabbit-hole-sf-fed-president-john-williams-seeks-direct-attack-on-low-inflation/ ]
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[Quote No.60390] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Asset bubbles, booms and busts:] If you investigate individually the manias that the market has so dubbed over the years, in every case, it was expansive monetary policy that generated the boom in an asset. The particular asset varied from one boom to another. But the basic underlying propagator was too-easy monetary policy and too-low interest rates that induced ordinary people to say, well, it's so cheap to acquire whatever is the object of desire in an asset boom, and go ahead and acquire that object. And then of course if monetary policy tightens, the boom collapses." - Anna Schwartz
American economist at the National Bureau of Economic Research in New York City. She was also the co-author with Milton Friedman of 'A Monetary History of the United States', published 1963. As quoted in a 2008 interview for the Wall Street Journal. [http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB122428279231046053 ]
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[Quote No.60398] Need Area: Money > Invest
"The moment you diversify, your returns are suboptimal, but it's likely to preserve your capital." - Marc Faber
Swiss investor based in Thailand. Faber is publisher of the 'Gloom Boom & Doom Report' newsletter and is the director of Marc Faber Ltd, which acts as an investment advisor and fund manager. [http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-13/dow-100000-marc-faber-warns-central-banks-will-monetize-everything-introduce-sociali ]
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[Quote No.60485] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Two vital marketplace signals are the profits that come with success and the losses that come with failure. When these two signals are not allowed to freely function, markets operate less efficiently." - Walter E. Williams

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[Quote No.60487] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Increases in money supply are what constitute inflation, and a general rise in prices is the symptom." - Walter E. Williams

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[Quote No.60516] Need Area: Money > Invest
"A flat yield curve squeezes bank interest margins and often precedes a credit contraction [which often precedes an inverted yield curve, a market bust and a recession]." - Colin Twiggs

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[Quote No.60524] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Keeping a little ahead of conditions is one of the secrets of business [especially investing]. " - Charles M. Schwab

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[Quote No.60604] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Before you invest, investigate." - William A. Ward

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[Quote No.60606] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Boom and bust momentum investing is dangerous requiring a greater fool to buy from you at a later date:] In the ruin of all collapsed booms is to be found the work of men who bought property at prices they knew perfectly well were fictitious, but who were willing to pay such prices simply because they knew that some still greater fool could be depended on to take the property off their hands and leave them with a profit." - Chicago Tribune
April 1890. [http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-10-03/greatest-fools-ever ]
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[Quote No.60633] Need Area: Money > Invest
"If you look back to the 1960s, the pattern is the same. Profits [and profit margins] rise after a recession as labor costs fall [as well as interest rates]. When the labor market reaches capacity, profits fall as labor costs rise. Then the Fed intervenes [to raise interest rates] to tame inflation from rising labor costs, causing another recession." - Colin Twiggs

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[Quote No.60740] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Remember when hearing about other's success or failure investing, either first-hand or second-hand,] ...people rarely tell the complete truth either about their amorous exploits or their stock portfolios, the latter being especially true for professional investors whose reputations hinge on appearing to be prescient about the market." - Liaquat Ahamed
'Lords of Finance: The Bankers Who Broke the World', published 2009, p. 342.
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[Quote No.60748] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[The political economy: i.e. - Monetary and fiscal policy and some of the effects on inflation, employment, economic growth, business profits and the share-market, currency 'strength' and the optics of who this all 'appears' to and actually helps - from importers to exporters, workers to investors, borrowers to savers, etc:] To the extent that you think government spending causes economic growth (a tenuous relationship, for sure), the central bank should respond by keeping monetary policy tighter than it ordinarily would [in order to keep inflation curtailed, especially wage inflation due to the increase in demand for the the same supply of workers. There are other issues to consider: for example: - the effect on the change in the 10 yr. government interest rate which determines the discount rate used to calculate the present value of a given cash-flow from a business and therefore its 'fair' share-market value and the share-markets 'fair' earning yield and price to earnings ratio as well as the demand for dividends versus capital growth stocks; the effect of the interest rates on business loans and business bond rates and therefore the businesses' profit margins per unit sold; the effect of the interest rates on customer borrowing to determine volume of units the businesses' sell including the effect of the interest rate differentials between domestic and foreign markets effecting currency strength and foreign competitors' competitiveness and; government regulations to determine personal and business deductions and taxes and therefore government budget deficits and spending priorities, etc., etc., etc]." - Jared Dillian
Editor, 'The 10th Man' - '...it is the duty of the 10th man to disagree', October 27, 2016. [http://www.mauldineconomics.com/the-10th-man ]
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[Quote No.60755] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Self-Defense and Martial Arts: geo-politics, global trade, conflicts and war:] I believe in adequate defense at the coastline and nothing else. If a nation comes over here to fight, then we'll fight. The trouble with America is that when the dollar only earns 6 percent over here, then it gets restless and goes overseas [and becomes what politicians euphemistically call 'American interests', rather than the more accurate moniker 'foreign interests'] to get 100 percent. Then the flag follows the dollar and the soldiers follow the flag [if those 'American interests' are 'threatened' politically, financially or physically]." - Smedley Butler
Major General USMC
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[Quote No.60835] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Free-market capitalism, consumer choice, competition, mergers and acquisitions and the danger with monopolies:] ...High M and A [Merger and Acquisition] activity may give the impression that the economy is robust, but in our opinion it merely reflects a sluggish economic environment as companies struggling to grow their revenues and profit margins organically, and turn to mergers and acquisitions instead. QE monetary policies have supported M and A activity by allowing ample availability of funding, as investors searching for yield are eager to buy corporate debt and drive credit margins lower. M and A activity causes a decrease in the number of firms and an increase of their respective market shares. This can result in significantly reduced competition between firms. In economic theory, when a few large firms dominate a market there is the potential to engage in collusive behaviours such as deliberately joining together in cartels in order to increase prices. In extreme cases a company that becomes too dominant develops the power to influence market price, run competition out of business or not allow competitors to emerge. Once enough other companies are bankrupt or bought off, the remaining company can stop improving its product, lower the quality and raise prices as much as it wishes, because consumers have no choice. It has been argued that some companies with large market shares can employ what game theorists call a 'trigger strategy,' whereby they signal to their competitors that if they lower their prices, they will start a vicious retail war. If a rogue player refuses to play the game, it becomes the target of an acquisition, not because it makes great products, but because owning it allows an oligopolist to raise prices. Another detrimental effect of low competition to the consumer was illustrated by an article in The New York Times entitled ‘Arbitration Everywhere, Stacking the Deck of Justice’, about the rise of private arbitration clauses in consumer services contracts, which allow large companies to avoid the court system and prevent consumers from joining together in class-action lawsuits. The Herfindahl-Hirschman index ('HHI') measures market concentration by industry and is used by regulators when reviewing mergers, values between 1,500 and 2,500 are defined as 'moderately concentrated,' while values above 2,500 are defined as 'highly concentrated'. The US beer market has a high HHI of 2696, it is dominated by one large producer, whose current market share is 46%. The company recently made a large acquisition, but subsequently was forced by the Department of Justice to sell part of the acquired business as the combined market share of 70% would have resulted in almost monopolistic conditions. At the turn of the 20th century, Teddy Roosevelt became president. He realised that for capitalism to maintain popular support, the monopolists and oligopolists of his time had to be taken on, and his presidency was driven by Trust busting. ... " - Russell Clark
Chief Investment Officer of hedge fund Horseman Global Management. [http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-12/what-worlds-most-bearish-hedge-fund-thinks-trump-presidency ]
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[Quote No.60836] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Free market capitalism, comparative advantage and foreign trade:] Economists still agree that Smoot-Hawley [Tariff Act] and the ensuing tariff wars were highly counterproductive and contributed to the depth and length of the global Depression [in the 1930's]." - Ben Bernanke

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[Quote No.60854] Need Area: Money > Invest
"...the problem with sharply higher US bond yield is that this tightens financial conditions. We have often seen rises in yield coincide with financial market crises [share market crashes, etc]. A rise in yields preceded the 1987 market crash. A rise in yield in 1994 preceded the Tequila crisis, when the Mexican peso devalued by half. After both events, yields quickly fell to new lows [as central banks increased liquidity and lowered interest rates to mitigate the financial problems caused by sharply rising bond yields and thereby the now much lower discounted cash-flow value of the share-market, etc]. Yields rose in 1996/7 before the Asian Financial Crisis, and yields again rose in 1999 before the dot com crash. After both events, yields fell to new lows. More recently, bond yields rose in 2006 before the Global Financial Crisis, and again in 2010/1 before the Euro-crisis. There was also a rise in yields before the crash in oil prices in 2014. In all cases yields fells to new low." - Russell Clark
Famous portfolio manager with the London-based hedge fund Horseman Global Fund. [http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-11-17/horseman-capital-sharp-spike-yields-preceded-every-market-crisis-last-20-years ]
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[Quote No.60903] Need Area: Money > Invest
"One of my favorite [business cycle investment timing] indicators, this graph compares profit margins (per unit of gross value added) to employee costs. There is a clear cycle: employee costs (per unit) fall after a recession while profits rise. As the economy recovers and approaches full capacity, employee costs start to rise and profits fall - which leads to the next recession." - Colin Twiggs

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[Quote No.60938] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Fundamental value investing during share-market crashes:] Investing is the only business I know that when things go on sale, people run out of the store." - Howard Marks
Oaktree Capital Management
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[Quote No.60981] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Contrarian investing style comes into its own when the majority have taken action and demand dissipates as then the opposite action often follows:] Whenever you find yourself on the side of the majority, it is time to pause and reflect." - Mark Twain

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[Quote No.61025] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Investing is a popularity contest, and the most dangerous thing is to buy something at the peak of its popularity." - Howard Marks

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[Quote No.61037] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Investing in turnarounds:] You can make a lot of money when things go from awful to merely bad." - Mark W. Yusko
Founder, Chief Investment Officer, and Chief Executive Officer of Morgan Creek Capital Management, LLC, an SEC-registered investment management firm that advises pension funds, endowments and wealthy individuals.
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