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  Quotations - Health  
[Quote No.49352] Need Area: Body > Health
"Warning Signs of a Heart Attack: Some heart attacks are sudden and intense — the 'movie heart attack,' where no one doubts what's happening. But most heart attacks start slowly, with mild pain or discomfort. Often people affected aren't sure what's wrong and wait too long before getting help. Here are signs that can mean a heart attack is happening: --•Chest discomfort. Most heart attacks involve discomfort in the center of the chest that lasts more than a few minutes, or that goes away and comes back. It can feel like uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or pain. --•Discomfort in other areas of the upper body. Symptoms can include pain or discomfort in one or both arms, the back, neck, jaw or stomach. --•Shortness of breath with or without chest discomfort. --•Other signs may include breaking out in a cold sweat, nausea or lightheadedness. As with men, women's most common heart attack symptom is chest pain or discomfort. But women are somewhat more likely than men to experience some of the other common symptoms, particularly shortness of breath, nausea/vomiting, and back or jaw pain. ... Learn the signs, but remember this: Even if you're not sure it's a heart attack, have it checked out (tell a doctor about your symptoms). Minutes matter! Fast action can save lives — maybe your own. Don't wait more than five minutes to call ... your [medical] emergency response number... [which] is almost always the fastest way to get lifesaving treatment. Emergency medical services (EMS) staff can begin treatment when they arrive — up to an hour sooner than if someone gets to the hospital by car. EMS staff are also trained to revive someone whose heart has stopped. Patients with chest pain who arrive by ambulance usually receive faster treatment at the hospital, too. It is best to call EMS for rapid transport to the emergency room." - www.heart.org
[http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/Conditions/HeartAttack/WarningSignsofaHeartAttack/Warning-Signs-of-a-Heart-Attack_UCM_002039_Article.jsp ]
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[Quote No.49405] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Smile easily and often because...] Every care drives a nail in our coffin, no doubt; But remember every merry grin draws one out!" - Saying

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[Quote No.49727] Need Area: Body > Health
"Enjoy present pleasures in such a way as not to injure future ones [i.e. preserve your health]!" - Lucius Annaeus Seneca
(4 B.C.-A.D. 65) Roman Stoic philosopher, statesman, dramatist
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[Quote No.50074] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Keys to a Good Death:] ...I’ve worked with hundreds of dying people... What I’ve learned through my experience is that what people most need on their deathbed is to be heard - to have their wishes considered and, whenever possible, fulfilled... Here are...ways to help create the conditions for a good death [arranged by this websites’ editor around the imagi-natives need areas]... ------1. Mind: --- Hand over control to a trusted person, someone committed to helping them have the kind of death they desire: The whole issue of deathbed conversations - asking a person what he needs or wants - is very important. What does the dying person want? How can they get that? Is it reasonable? Sometimes it’s not reasonable: A friend’s dying mother wanted help in ending her own life; well, that wasn’t going to happen. Sometimes you can have the conversation without acting on it, and any conflicts or issues can be addressed. --- Satisfy any remaining wishes that are consistent with their present condition: Some people want to live long enough to go to a grandson’s graduation, to see a book published, to see a cousin they were close to who lives 3000 miles away. But, be careful that these are the wishes of the patient and not just the patient’s significant others. There’s a difference between a good death and an appropriated death - one that’s stolen from the dying person by other forces, including the agenda of close family members. ------2 Body: --- Experience as little pain as possible: When I talk of being pain-free, I mean physically, psycho-socially, and spiritually pain-free. Nowadays, there are medications that can manage most people’s physical pain and make them far more comfortable, and these should not be denied to any patient. --- Be protected from needless procedures that serve to only dehumanize and demean without much or any benefit: Emergency rooms, ICU’s, and 911 are set up to preserve life and are not typically supportive of the conditions for a good death. If a person is suffering tremendously, there may be cause to get emergency help; but for most situations, when you throw a person into the larger healthcare system, the prevention of death becomes the imperative, and that can serve to increase suffering for the dying person. One has to be very persistent and clear to avoid procedures that are unwanted - to insist on palliative or hospice care, instead. It can help to have an advanced directive or a ‘physician-orders for life sustaining treatment’ in writing and communicated to loved ones; but often a person also needs a vocal advocate - a family member, friend, or volunteer caregiver [perhaps a medical power of attorney]. ------3 Money: [Best considered through a legal will and perhaps a power of attorney] ------4 Work: --- Review their life to find meaning: There are two main ways that people on their deathbeds find meaning: in the recognition of all of the people they have loved and who have loved them, and in the work that they’ve done that has contributed to the greater good. In some cases, contributory work will be obvious; in others, it may be less so. But, helping the dying to articulate what brought meaning to their lives will help them feel more at peace with their death... ------5 Property: [Best considered through a legal will and perhaps a power of attorney] ------6 Food: [As pleasant as medically sensible] ------7 Friends: --- Decide how social and how alert they want to be: Sometimes a dying person wants solitude; sometimes he or she wants friends and family around. Whatever the case, the dying person should decide. And, though trickier, dying people should be allowed to decide how much consciousness they want. Some people want to sleep all of the time; others want to be alert as much as possible. Once these wishes are known, an advocate can help make that happen. --- Recognize and resolve interpersonal conflicts: We must also recognize psycho-social pain, the residue of life’s unresolved conflicts with other people. There are almost always interpersonal issues within families, and sometimes between close friends, when one is dying - people who’ve become estranged, 'I love you’s' that were never expressed, and more. Ira Byock, a palliative care doctor, wrote in his book, ‘The Four Things That Matter Most’, that there are four basic messages a person needs to communicate at the end of life: - ‘I love you.’ - ‘Thank you.’ - ‘I forgive you.’ - ‘Please forgive me.’ These, I think, are a good start. A good death creates a space for people to say those words. --- Experience as little pain as possible: When I talk of being pain-free, I mean physically, psycho-socially, and spiritually pain-free... Spiritual pain can occur, too. In fact, I have sat with several clergy who had crises of faith on their deathbeds. Sometimes, easing spiritual pain can be accomplished by the presence of a person of faith or readings from sacred texts; other times, it’s better to have someone who can engage in spiritual questioning. Either way, spiritual issues are common at the end of life, and they need attention. --8 Fun: --- Review their life to find meaning: There are two main ways that people on their deathbeds find meaning: in the recognition of all of the people they have loved and who have loved them, and in the work that they’ve done that has contributed to the greater good. In some cases, contributory work will be obvious; in others, it may be less so. But, helping the dying to articulate what brought meaning to their lives will help them feel more at peace with their death..." - Dr. Charles Garfield
He is the Clinical Professor of Psychology in the Department of Psychiatry at the University of California School of Medicine at San Francisco (UCSF). He is also a Fellow of the American Psychological Association and a Visiting Scholar at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley. He has been recognized internationally as the founder of Shanti, which has been at the forefront of a growing U.S. national movement to enhance the quality of life for persons living with life-threatening or chronic illnesses by providing volunteer-based emotional and practical support. His ten books include 'Sometimes My Heart Goes Numb: Love and Caregiving in a Time of AIDS' and 'Stress and Survival: The Emotional Realities of Life Threatening Illness'. He is a member of the Greater Good Science Center’s editorial board. [refer for originally arranged article http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/seven_keys_to_good_death? ]
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[Quote No.50427] Need Area: Body > Health
"Every time one laughs a nail is removed from one's coffin." - Honduran Proverb

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[Quote No.51568] Need Area: Body > Health
"Never underestimate the power of dreams and the influence of the human spirit [to overcome obstacles, including in my case polio and a deformed left leg]. We are all the same in this notion. The potential for greatness lives within each of us." - Wilma Rudolph
Inspirational athlete who overcame polio to become the fastest woman sprinter in the world in the 1960 Olympics.
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[Quote No.51645] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: 'Optimism']

...
Talk health. The dreary, never-changing tale,
Of mortal maladies is worn and stale.
You cannot charm, or interest, or please,
By harping on that minor chord, disease.
Say you are well, or all is well with you,
And God shall hear your words and make them true.

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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[Quote No.51755] Need Area: Body > Health
"In the nineteenth century health was transformed by clear, clean water. In the twenty-first century, health will be transformed by clean clear knowledge." - Sir Muir Gray
Doctor and Director UK NHS [National Health Service] National Knowledge Service and NHS Chief Knowledge Officer.
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[Quote No.51958] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about courage and the rewards of persistence:] - My Miraculous Family - I never considered myself unique, but people are constantly telling me, 'I am a miracle.' To me, I was just an ordinary 'guy' with realistic goals and big dreams. I was a 19-year-old student at the University of Texas and well on my way toward fulfilling my 'big dream' of one day becoming an orthopedic surgeon. On the night of February 17, 1981 I was studying for an Organic Chemistry test at the library with Sharon, my girlfriend of three years. Sharon had asked me to drive her back to her dormitory as it was getting quite late. We got into my car, not realizing that just getting into a car would never quite be the same for me again. I quickly noticed that my gas gauge was registered on empty so I pulled into a nearby convenience store to buy $2.00 worth of gas. 'I'll be back in two minutes,' I yelled at Sharon as I closed the door. But instead, those two minutes changed my life forever. Entering the convenience store was like entering the twilight zone. On the outside I was a healthy, athletic, pre-med student, but on the inside I was just another statistic of a violent crime. I thought I was entering an empty store, but suddenly I realized it was not empty at all. Three robbers were in the process of committing a robbery and my entrance into the store caught them by surprise. One of the criminals immediately shoved a .38 caliber handgun to my head, ordered me to the cooler, pushed me down on the floor, and pumped a bullet into the back of my head - execution style. He obviously thought I was dead because he did not shoot me again. The trio of thieves finished robbing the store and left calmly. Meanwhile, Sharon wondered why I had not returned. After seeing the three men leave the store she really began to worry as I was the last person she saw entering the store. She quickly went inside to look for me, but saw no one -- only an almost empty cash register containing one check and several pennies. Quickly she ran down each aisle shouting, 'Mike, Mike!' Just then the attendant appeared from the back of the store shouting, 'Lady, get down on the floor. I've just been robbed and shot at!' Sharon quickly dropped to the floor screaming, 'Have you seen my boyfriend ... auburn hair?' The man did not reply but went back to the cooler where he found me choking on my vomit. The attendant quickly cleaned my mouth and then called for the police and an ambulance. Sharon was in shock. She was beginning to understand that I was hurt, but she could not begin to comprehend or imagine the severity of my injury. When the police arrived they immediately called the homicide division as they did not think I would survive and the paramedic reported that she had never seen a person so severely wounded survive. At 1:30 a.m. my parents who lived in Houston, were awakened by a telephone call from Brackenridge Hospital advising them to come to Austin as soon as possible for they feared I would not make it through the night. But I did make it through the night and early in the morning the neurosurgeon decided to operate. However, he quickly informed my family and Sharon that my chances of surviving the surgery were only 40/60. If this were not bad enough, the neurosurgeon further shocked my family by telling them what life would be like for me if I beat the odds and survived. He said I probably would never walk, talk, or be able to understand even simple commands. My family was hoping and praying to hear even the slightest bit of encouragement from that doctor. Instead, his pessimistic words gave my family no reason to believe that I would ever again be a productive member of society. But once again I beat the odds and survived the three and a half hours of surgery. Even though my family breathed a huge sigh of relief that I was still alive the doctor cautioned that it would still be several days before I would be out of danger. However, with each passing day I became stronger and stronger and two weeks later I was well enough to be moved from the ICU to a private room. Granted, I still could not talk, my entire right side was paralyzed and many people thought I could not understand, but at least I was stable. After one week in a private room the doctors felt I had improved enough to be transferred by jet ambulance to Del Oro Rehabilitation Hospital in Houston. My hallucinations, coupled with my physical problems, made my prognosis still very bleak. However, as time passed my mind began to clear and approximately six weeks later my right leg began to move ever so slightly. Within seven weeks my right arm slowly began to move and at eight weeks I uttered my first few words. My speech was extremely difficult and slow in the beginning, but at least it was a beginning. I was starting to look forward to each new day to see how far I would progress. But just as I thought my life was finally looking brighter I was tested by the hospital neuropsychologist. She explained to me that judging from my test results she believed that I should not focus on returning to college but that it would be better to set more 'realistic goals.' Upon hearing her evaluation I became furious for I thought, 'Who is she to tell me what I can or cannot do. She does not even know me. I am a very determined and stubborn person!' I believe it was at that very moment that I decided I would somehow, someday return to college. It took me a long time and a lot of hard work but I finally returned to the University of Texas in the fall of 1983 - a year and a half after almost dying. The next few years in Austin were very difficult for me, but I truly believe that in order to see beauty in life you have to experience some unpleasantness. Maybe I have experienced too much unpleasantness, but I believe in living each day to the fullest, and doing the very best I can. And each new day was very busy and very full, for besides attending classes at the University I underwent therapy three to five days each week at Brackenridge Hospital. If this were not enough I flew to Houston every other weekend to work with Tom Williams, a trainer and executive who had worked for many colleges and professional teams and also had helped many injured athletes, such as Earl Campbell and Eric Dickerson. Through Tom I learned: 'Nothing is impossible and never, never give up or quit.' He echoed the same words and sentiments of a prominent neurosurgeon from Houston, Dr. Alexander Gol, who was a close personal friend of my parents and who drove to Austin with my family in the middle of the night that traumatic February morning. Over the many months I received many opinions from different therapists and doctors but it was Dr. Gol who told my family to take one day at a time, for no matter how bad the situation looked, no one knew for certain what the brain could do. Early, during my therapy, my father kept repeating to me one of his favorite sayings. It could have been written by both Tom and Dr. Gol and I have repeated it almost every day since being hurt: 'Mile by mile it's a trial; yard by yard it's hard; but inch by inch it's a cinch!' I thought of those words, and I thought of Dr. Gol, Tom, my family and Sharon who believed so strongly in me as I climbed the steps to receive my diploma from the Dean of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas on that bright sunny afternoon in June of 1986. Excitement and pride filled my heart as I heard the dean announce that I had graduated with 'highest honors' (grade point average of 3.885), been elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and been chosen as one of 12 Dean's Distinguished Graduates out of 1600 in the College of Liberal Arts. The overwhelming emotions and feelings that I experienced at that very moment, when most of the audience gave me a standing ovation, I felt would never again be matched in my life -- not even when I graduated with a masters degree in social work and not even when I became employed full time at the Texas Pain and Stress Center. But I was wrong! On May 24, 1987, I realized that nothing could ever match the joy I felt as Sharon and I were married. Sharon, my high school sweetheart of nine years, had always stood by me, through good and bad times. To me, Sharon is my miracle, my diamond in a world filled with problems, hurt, and pain. It was Sharon who dropped out of school when I was hurt so that she could constantly be at my side. She never wavered or gave up on me. It was her faith and love that pulled me through so many dark days. While other nineteen year old girls were going to parties and enjoying life, Sharon devoted her life to my recovery. That, to me, is the true definition of love. After our beautiful wedding I continued working part time at the Pain Center and completed my work for a masters degree while Sharon worked as a speech pathologist at a local hospital. We were extremely happy, but even happier when we learned Sharon was pregnant. On July 11, 1990 at 12:15 a.m. Sharon woke me with the news: 'We need to go to the hospital .... my water just broke.' I couldn't help but think how ironic it was that my life almost ended in a convenience store and now on the date '7-11' we were about to bring a new life into this world. This time it was my turn to help Sharon as she had helped me over those past years. Sharon was having contractions about every two minutes, and each time she needed to have her lower back massaged. Since she was in labor for 15 hours that meant 450 massages!! It was well worth every bit of pain in my fingers because at 3:10 p.m. Sharon and I experienced the birth of our beautiful daughter, Shawn Elyse Segal! Tears of joy and happiness came to my eyes as our healthy, alert, wonderful daughter entered this world. We anxiously counted her 10 fingers and her 10 toes and watched her wide eyes take in the world about her. It was truly a beautiful picture that was etched in my mind forever as she lay in her mother's waiting arms, just minutes after her birth. At that moment I thanked God for blessing us with the greatest miracle of all -- Shawn Elyse Segal." - Michael Jordan Segal
'Teaching What I Most Need to Know'
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[Quote No.52028] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about making the best of each day.] - Peggy's Paper Dolls - Brian scanned the walls of the same corridor that had become so familiar to him over the past few years. As he entered through door number thirty-two, a tremendous wave of emotion swept over him, and he had to fight not to drown in it. His sister's face lit up with a vibrant smile and that special twinkle in her eyes, as it always did whenever she saw him. Peggy was seven years old. She charmed everyone that knew her with her undying enthusiasm. She would talk non-stop to a listening ear, and she seldom cried. Peggy was dying of cancer. Brian was at the hospital constantly, knowing that his little sister had only a short time to live. His average life as a sixteen-year old had taken a traumatic turn for the worst upon the diagnosis. He loved his sister more than anything, and found himself becoming enraged that she, such a sweet and innocent girl, should be inflicted with such a horrible disease. Brimming with creativity, Peggy amazed Brian. She had a collection of paper dolls that she had made. All sixty-two were tacked behind her bed. Brian would ask her about the dolls, but she would always just smile, and say happily that they were her friends. He would be saddened by the fact that Peggy could not have the normal life of a seven-year-old, and make her own friends. It would only dishearten him more to watch her play with the other sick children. Each day that passed was like a ticking time bomb for Brian. Peggy grew physically weaker by the day, but her spirit remained strong. Each one of her smiles pierced his heart. She would ask him why he looked so sad, for he found it difficult to smile, though he pretended that everything was all right. When he wasn't at the hospital, he would spend most of his time at home, alone in his room. There were times when he would bang his head uncontrollably against the wall until it hurt. He would cry, shamelessly, and throw mad fits for no reason. His life was falling apart, almost as if it was him that was dying. It was two weeks after Peggy's eighth birthday that she passed away. Though expected, it broke Brian's heart. No amount of anticipation could have prepared him for the silence that was Peggy's passing. As Brian forced himself to walk through door number thirty-two in the cancer ward one last time, he almost expected to see Peggy sitting on her bed. He prayed that he would see her face light up, just like it always had. It was only the emptiness and coldness of the bed that greeted him, though. He wanted to scream and smash the table lamp on the floor. He wanted to do anything to escape from the silence. Silence was a foreign entity with Peggy around, but she was gone, and its presence was so thick that it suffocated him Then he saw the tiny paper dolls smiling back at him from the wall. Brian found a shoe box to put them in, unable to throw them away. One by one he removed them from the wall, seeing for the first time the inscriptions on the back of each: Terrah, Ivy, Nicole, Amy, Justin, Chris...and on and on. There was one name that stuck in his mind: Jesse. Jesse had been Peggy's first and best friend at the hospital. Jesse had died about one year ago. Then Brian began to recognize more names, and he realized why they seemed so familiar. Peggy's paper dolls were all the children that had died since she had arrived. When Brian finally pulled the sixty-second doll off the wall with a quivering hand, he realized that there was one that had not been there before. It was purple, Peggy's favourite colour, with a wide crayon smile. As Brian turned the doll over and read the back, he was snapped out of his state of denial, realizing for the first time that his sister was not coming back. Tears flooded his eyes as the name, scrawled in crayon, ‘Peggy’, screamed at him. She had known. In his head he could hear the sweet voice that he had known for so long, but for the first time, he understood her. All the time he had been inconspicuous, pretending that everything would turn out all right, for her benefit. (Or maybe it was for his own sake?). All along, she knew that she was going to die, yet not once did she say that it wasn't fair. As the memories of Peggy reeled through Brian's head, he realized that he could not remember a time when she had been truly unhappy. Peggy, only a child, had accepted her disease and death as a part of her life. She faced most people's worst fear with courage, and the determination to make each day that she lived worthwhile. The dolls were a means of remembrance and symbols of life. Instead of mourning the ones that she had loved, she remembered all the joy that they had brought her. Viewing life through Peggy's eyes, Brian saw that she didn't want to be known as the girl that died of cancer, but as the girl that shone like the sun. From his perspective, each day had escorted his sister one step closer to death. Through Peggy's eyes, each day of her life gave her one more day to shine. Wrapped up in his own sense of loss, Brian had let her illness eat away at his own mentality. Instead of being a big brother, he had given up, and now it was too late. He could have shared her life with her, if he'd only realized. Brian looked down at the small paper doll in his hand through salty tears, and he realized that it was not too late. He could still follow in her footsteps, and learn how to seek out the best in any situation. Suddenly he felt the odd sensation of a smile. Though choked with sobs and heartache, it paved the path for more smiles in his life, that he may never have had the courage to find had it not been for Peggy's attitude. He had never realized that he knew so little about his sister, but most importantly, that he would learn so much from her, the bravest girl on earth. From that day on, Brian learned not to dwell upon life's downsides, but to search for the positives that were sometimes hidden in the shadows of his fears. So often do people live for the future and for what ‘will be’, that they forget and take for granted ‘what is’. Peggy understood that the present was a gift. Every day, she would open her gift to discover all of the splendor and happiness that it had to offer. To realize the value of the present is only half of the battle. It is having the courage and the determination to live within it that wins it. Peggy was gone, but her memory, her heart, and all that was expressed through one child's paper dolls remained." - Casey-Jo Timson

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[Quote No.52071] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: 'I Am Blessed Indeed']

Today upon a bus I saw a lovely girl with golden hair.
I envied her - she seemed so gay - and wished I were as fair.
But suddenly she rose to leave. I saw her hobble down the aisle,
she had only one leg and wore a crutch, but as she passed...a smile.
Oh, God forgive me when I whine,
I have two legs, the world is mine.

I stopped to buy some candy. The lad who sold them had such charm.
I stopped to talk to him, he seemed so glad, if I was late could do no harm.
As I left he said to me, 'I thank-you, you have been so kind.
It's nice to talk to folks like you, you see,' he said, 'I am blind.'
Oh, God forgive me when I whine,
I have two eyes, the world is mine.

Later while walking down the street, I saw a child with eyes of blue.
He stood and watched the others play, he did not know what to do.
I stopped a moment and said, 'Why don't you join the others, dear?'
He looked ahead without a word and then I knew, he couldn't hear.
Oh, God forgive me when I whine,
I have two ears, the world is mine.

With feet to take me where I go,
with eyes to see the sunset glow,
with ears to hear what I would know.
Oh, God forgive me when I whine,
I am blessed indeed, the world is mine!

" - Og Mandino
(adapted from original by Red Foley)
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[Quote No.52082] Need Area: Body > Health
"['Patch Adams' is a movie, released in 1998, starring Robin Williams and Monica Potter and based on the book 'Gesundheit: Good Health Is a Laughing Matter' by Dr. Hunter 'Patch' Adams and Maureen Mylander, about his approach to medicine emphasizing humor. Born on May 28, 1945, he is an American physician, social activist, clown, and author. And like Robin Williams' character in the film, the real Patch Adams did in fact contemplate suicide. After Patch's father passed away of a heart attack when they were stationed in Germany, Patch's family moved back home and had to adjust to civilian life in suburban northern Virginia. For a short time, they stayed with his aunt and uncle. His uncle was a lawyer and an independent thinker, who quickly became Patch's surrogate father. Even after he, his mother, and his brother moved into their own house, Patch still spent a lot of time talking to his uncle. Early during his freshman year in college, the uncle who Patch admired committed suicide. It didn't happen long after his high school girlfriend Donna had broke up with him. Just before Halloween in 1964, an extremely depressed Patch Adams dropped out of college. In an interview, he discussed his thoughts of suicide:] I obsessed about suicide every day but needed to work up to it, so I went to a cliff near the college called Lover's Leap and sat at the edge, writing epic poetry to Donna. I composed sonnets, searching for the right words that would really get to her. If I had ever finished my outpourings I would have jumped. Fortunately, I was too long-winded. After a disastrous visit with Donna, I took a Greyhound bus home and trudged six miles through snow to my mother's doorstep. When she opened the door I told her that I'd been trying to kill myself so she'd better check me into a mental hospital. [After considering suicide, Patch Adams advised his mother to check him into a psychiatric facility. It was there that he realized that many of the patients around him suffered from extreme lonliness. They didn't have people in their lives who loved them as did he. He made friends with the patients, and he soon discovered that the key to human happiness is having loving and caring people in your life. It was then that he decided that the best way to spread his newfound knowledge was by becoming a doctor. Patch became 'a student of life, of happy life. I wanted to know everything possible about people and happiness and friendship,' Patch says. He had been a student of science since he was a boy, and he always had a desire to be a doctor. His temporary stay at the mental hospital provided him with the right motivation to become one. The film depicts a mid-life Patch (Robin Williams) staying at a mental hospital. In reality, Patch Adams endured three different mental hospitalizations when he was much younger, during the time when he was 17 and 18-years-old.]" - Patch Adams
Born on May 28, 1945, Dr. Hunter 'Patch' Adams is an American physician, social activist, clown, and author. He founded the Gesundheit! Institute in 1971 and has written the book, 'Gesundheit: Good Health Is a Laughing Matter' with Maureen Mylander. [Refer http://www.chasingthefrog.com/reelfaces/patchadams.php ]
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[Quote No.52148] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about perseverance and dogged determination regardless of disabilities, real pain and reasonable excuses.] - A Different Kind of Athlete - We found out that Jenny was hearing impaired, when she was four and a half years old. Several surgeries and speech classes later, when she was seven, we found out that Jenny had Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. She could not put pressure on the heels of her feet, so she walked on tiptoe, and when the pain became unbearable, I carried her. Jenny was fortunate, though, because she did not suffer the deformities, often associated with JRA. All through grade school, and on into high school, Jenny suffered, yet never complained. She took her medicine, and I would often wrap her feet in steaming towels, and hold her until the pain eased. But, as soon as she could withstand the pain, Jenny, immediately, carried on, as though she were pain free. She wore a smile on her face, a song on her lips, and a love and acceptance of others, that was, simply, amazing. I don't remember her ever voicing self-pity. She ran, when she could run. She played when she could play, and she danced when she could dance. And, when she could do none of these things, she took her medicine, and she waited until she could. Jenny, a beautiful blonde, with warm brown eyes, was never a cheerleader. She never competed in a sport. She could not even take part in a Gym Class, though she took the same health class four years in a row, just so she could pass with a substitute credit each year. She joined the band. She won a place in the Governor's School for the Arts; yet, no one in the Charleston, South Carolina School System knew what to do with Jenny. The perimeters were, simply, not in place to deal with a student, who was both active and handicapped. Jenny continued to have one surgery after another on her ears, all through school. Her hearing improved to 60%, and she taught herself to read lips. She carried a pillow to school, all through high school, and once, when she suddenly experienced crippling pain, her friends scooped her up, and carried her from class to class. She was totally mainstreamed, popular, and funny, attending every football game, cheering the team on, carrying her pillow everywhere she went, so that she could cushion the pain, when she sat down. Then came her senior year. She would be considered for scholarships; however school activities, especially sports, could often mean the difference between receiving an award or losing out. So Jenny came to a decision; and in her quirky, unorthodox manner, she began to bombard the high school football coach. She begged. She pleaded. She promised. She got her best friend to sign up with her. Finally the coach gave in, with the admonition, ‘If you miss ONE game, you're out!’ So, Jenny became Manager of the Garrett High School Football Team. She carried big buckets of water to her teammates. She bandaged knees and ankles before every game. She massaged necks and backs. She gave pep talks. She was continually at their beck and call, and it turned out to be one of the best years for Garrett High School Football Team, in its twenty-five year history. Often Jenny could be seen carrying a bucket of water in each hand, nearly dragging them, along with her pillow tucked under her arm. When asked why he thought that the team was winning all their games, even in the face of injury, one linebacker explained, in his soft, Charleston drawl, ‘Well, when you've been knocked down, and you can't seem to move, you look up and see Jenny Lewis, limping across the field, dragging her buckets and carrying her pillow. It makes anything the rest of us may suffer seem pretty insignificant.’ At the Senior Awards ceremony, Jenny received a number of scholarships to College of Charleston. Her favorite scholarship, however, was a small one from the Charleston Women's Club. The President of the Women's Club listed Jenny's accomplishments, starting with her grades, and ending with an excited, ‘...and the first girl to letter in football, in Garrett High School history!'" - Jaye Lewis

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[Quote No.52163] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A story - with a message about the importance of laughter.] - Humor Can Save Your Life - The story goes that a certain court jester went too far one day and insulted his king. The king became so infuriated he sentenced the jester to be executed. His court prayed upon the king to have mercy for this man who had served him well for so many years. After a time, the king relented only enough to give the jester his choice as to how he would like to die. True to form, the jester replied, ‘If it's all the same to you, my Lord, I'd like to die of old age.’ Certainly in this case, a good sense of humor saved the man's life. It's true for us as well. We may not be faced with a situation where our wit will save us from an execution, but our sense of humor and the ability to laugh at things has proven health benefits that extend and improve our quality of life. Norman Cousins, in his book 'Anatomy of an Illness', wrote about how he cured himself of cancer by laughing a good part of each day. He rented films of comedies and watched them for hours on end in his hospital room. He had nothing to lose since he'd been diagnosed as terminal. His ‘experiment’ turned out to be a classic example of the healing powers of laughter. If it worked for Cousins with a life-threatening illness, it can work for us to enhance and protect our good health. We should laugh often and heartily. It's good for our digestion and our disposition. Besides, life's too important to take seriously." - Michael Angier
Founder of Success Networks.
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[Quote No.52196] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about the importance of loving relationships in a healthy life.] - Love Cures - Early in the 20th century, two young medical school graduates and their father started a small sanatorium for mental patients on a farm outside Topeka, Kansas. This was a time with the 'rest cure' was in vouge in psychiatry, and patients were sent to impersonal institutions to life out their days. This father and his sons had a different idea. They were determined to create a loving, family atmosphere among their patients and staff. The nurses were given special training and were told 'Let each person know how much you value them. Shower these people with love.' The doctors were Karl and William Menninger, and the Minninger Clinic, with such 'revolutionary' methods, became world famous and has helped countless numbers of people. Karl Menninger said, 'Love cures people - both the ones who give it and the ones who receive it. This intangible thing love...enters into every therapeutic relationship. It is an element which finds and heals, which comforts and restores, which works what we have to call for now, miracles.' " - Neil Eskelin

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[Quote No.52440] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem:]

'Oh, I Wish I’d Looked After Me Teeth'

Oh, I wish I’d looked after me teeth,
And spotted the dangers beneath
All the toffees I chewed,
And the sweet sticky food.
Oh, I wish I’d looked after me teeth.

I wish I’d been that much more willin’
When I had more tooth there than fillin’
To give up gobstoppers,
From respect to me choppers,
And to buy something else with me shillin’.

When I think of the lollies I licked
And the liquorice allsorts I picked,
Sherbet dabs, big and little,
All that hard peanut brittle,
My conscience gets horribly pricked.

My mother, she told me no end,
‘If you got a tooth, you got a friend.’
I was young then, and careless,
My toothbrush was hairless,
I never had much time to spend.

Oh I showed them the toothpaste all right,
I flashed it about late at night,
But up-and-down brushin’
And pokin’ and fussin’
Didn’t seem worth the time – I could bite!

If I’d known I was paving the way
To cavities, caps and decay,
The murder of fillin’s,
Injections and drillin’s,
I’d have thrown all me sherbet away.

So I lie in the old dentist’s chair,
And I gaze up his nose in despair,
And his drill it do whine
In these molars of mine.
‘Two amalgam,’ he’ll say, ‘for in there.’

How I laughed at my mother’s false teeth,
As they foamed in the waters beneath.
But now comes the reckonin’
It’s methey are beckonin’
Oh, I wish I’d looked after me teeth.

" - Pam Ayres
Taken from her book, 'The Works: The Classic Collection', 2008. [Downloaded from http://www.pamayres.com/index.php/category/poems/ ]
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[Quote No.52441] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem:]

'Oh No, I've Got A Cold'

I am sitting on the sofa.
By the fire and staying in.
Me head is free of comfort
And me nose is free of skin
Me friends have run for cover,
They have left me pale and sick
With me pockets full of tissues
And me nostrils full of Vick.

" - Pam Ayres
[Downloaded from http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Pam_Ayres ]
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[Quote No.52616] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about dissatisfaction-discontent and envy-jealousy.]

'Anywhere Out of the World'

Life is a hospital where every patient is obsessed by the desire of changing beds. One would like to suffer opposite the stove, another is sure he would get well beside the window.

" - Charles Baudelaire
(1821 - 1867), Charles Pierre Baudelaire was a French poet, essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. This quote is just the first few lines of this poem.
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[Quote No.52694] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about the virtue of thinking ahead about the future consequences of your present choices in order to make good decisions and be happy now and later in life.]

'The Old Man's Comforts and How He Gained Them'

You are old, Father William, the young man cried,
The few locks which are left you are grey;
You are hale, Father William, a hearty old man,
Now tell me the reason I pray.

In the days of my youth, Father William replied,
I remember'd that youth would fly fast,
And abused not my health and my vigour at first
That I never might need them at last.

...

" - Robert Southey
(1774 - 1843), English poet of the Romantic school, one of the so-called 'Lake Poets', and Poet Laureate for 30 years from 1813 to his death in 1843.
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[Quote No.52704] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about the final illness before death.]

'Dregs'

The fire is out, and spent the warmth thereof,
(This is the end of every song man sings!)
The golden wine is drunk, the dregs remain,
Bitter as wormwood and as salt as pain;
And health and hope have gone the way of love
Into the drear oblivion of lost things.
Ghosts go along with us until the end;
This was a mistress, this, perhaps, a friend.
With pale, indifferent eyes, we sit and wait
For the dropped curtain and the closing gate:
This is the end of all the songs man sings.

" - Ernest Christopher Dowson
(1867 - 1900) English poet, novelist, and short-story writer, often associated with the Decadent movement.
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[Quote No.52914] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about an experience of being deathly ill and then feeling better]

'Farewell, Life.'

Farewell, life! my senses swim.
And the world is growing dim;
Thronging shadows cloud the light,
Like the advent of the night, -
Colder, colder, colder still,
Upward steals a vapor chill;
Strong the earthly odor grows, -
I smell the mold above the rose!

Welcome, life! the spirit strives!
Strength returns and hope revives;
Cloudy fears and shapes forlorn
Fly like shadows at the morn, -
O'er the earth there comes a bloom;
Sunny light for sullen gloom,
Warm perfume for vapor cold, -
I smell the rose above the mold!

" - Thomas Hood
(1799 – 1845) British humorist and poet. Written during a sickness in April, 1845. He died 3rd May 1845.
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[Quote No.53004] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about how even being sick can be a blessing in disguise that you can be grateful for, if you try to make the most of the opportunities it presents. For example 'making a virtue of a necessity' in this case by using the quiet days of recuperation.]

'Quiet Days'

The gentle, cheerful ticking of a clock;
A cloud that moves in leisurely pursuit;
The slow erosion of an ageless rock;
The timeless roar of sea that is not mute;
The patient building of a hill by ants;
The laboured steps before a child can walk;
The months when baby's words are chirps and chants,
Before he has acquired the skill of talk --
These made me wonder at my restless haste,
But it was illness that taught me to know
That quiet days are not a barren waste;
Though one lies still, the heart and mind can grow.

" - Mildred T. Mey

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[Quote No.53139] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about improving your health]

'The Five Best Doctors'

The five best doctors anywhere,
And no one can deny it,
Are Doctors Sunshine, Water, Air,
Exercise and Diet.

These five will gladly you attend,
If only you are willing;
Your mind they'll cheer, your ills they'll mend,
And charge you not one shilling.

" - O. S. Hoffman

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[Quote No.53285] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about the value of visiting sick friends and receiving visitors when sick]

'Visit The Sick'

A visit to the sick is such...
A brief and little thing...
And yet, consider all the joy...
And good that it can bring...
It means so much in every way ...
To one who lies in bed...
With only flowers to observe...
And papers to be read...
A visit gives that human touch ...
Of one more helping hand...
And all the faithful friendliness...
That tries to understand...

" - James J. Metcalfe

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[Quote No.53544] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Poem: about the need to care for our health, especially when young and working hard]

We squander health in search of wealth;
We scheme and toil and save;
Then squander wealth in search of health,
But only find a grave.

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.53700] Need Area: Body > Health
"The health of the people is really the foundation upon which all their happiness and all their powers as a state depend." - Benjamin Disraeli

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[Quote No.53872] Need Area: Body > Health
"Five Ways Music Can Make You Healthier! - New studies are suggesting that music can be more powerful than medication: When I gave birth to my first-born, I listened to CDs of classical music in the hospital. I figured that music would help calm me and distract me from the pain. You might use music to distract yourself from painful or stressful situations, too. Or perhaps you’ve listened to music while studying or working out, hoping to up your performance. Though you may sense that music helps you feel better somehow, only recently has science begun to figure out why that is. Neuroscientists have discovered that listening to music heightens positive emotion through the reward centers of our brain, stimulating hits of dopamine that can make us feel good, or even elated. Listening to music also lights up other areas of the brain - in fact, almost no brain center is left untouched - suggesting more widespread effects and potential uses for music. Music’s neurological reach, and its historic role in healing and cultural rituals, has led researchers to consider ways music may improve our health and wellbeing. In particular, researchers have looked for applications in health-care - for example, helping patients during post-surgery recovery or improving outcomes for people with Alzheimer’s. In some cases, music’s positive impacts on health have been more powerful than medication. Here are five ways that music seems to impact our health and wellbeing. ---1: Music reduces stress and anxiety: My choice to bring music into the birthing room was probably a good one. Research has shown that listening to music - at least music with a slow tempo and low pitch, without lyrics or loud instrumentation - can calm people down, even during highly stressful or painful events. Music can prevent anxiety-induced increases in heart rate and systolic blood pressure, and decrease cortisol levels—all biological markers of stress. In one study, researchers found that patients receiving surgery for hernia repair who listened to music after surgery experienced decreased plasma cortisol levels and required significantly less morphine to manage their pain. In another study involving surgery patients, the stress reducing effects of music were more powerful than the effect of an orally-administered anxiolytic drug. Performing music, versus listening to music, may also have a calming effect. In studies with adult choir singers, singing the same piece of music tended to synch up their breathing and heart rates, producing a group-wide calming effect. In a recent study, 272 premature babies were exposed to different kinds of music - either lullabies sung by parents or instruments played by a music therapist - three times a week while recovering in a neonatal ICU. Though all the musical forms improved the babies’ functioning, the parental singing had the greatest impact and also reduced the stress of the parents who sang. Though it’s sometimes hard in studies like this to separate out the effects of music versus other factors, like the positive impacts of simple social contact, at least one recent study found that music had a unique contribution to make in reducing anxiety and stress in a children’s hospital, above and beyond social contributions. ---2: Music decreases pain: Music has a unique ability to help with pain management, as I found in my own experience with giving birth. In a 2013 study, sixty people diagnosed with fibromyalgia - a disease characterized by severe musculoskeletal pain - were randomly assigned to listen to music once a day over a four-week period. In comparison to a control group, the group that listened to music experienced significant pain reduction and fewer depressive symptoms. In another recent study, patients undergoing spine surgery were instructed to listen to self-selected music on the evening before their surgery and until the second day after their surgery. When measured on pain levels post surgery, the group had significantly less pain than a control group who didn’t listen to music. It’s not clear why music may reduce pain, though music’s impact on dopamine release may play a role. Of course, stress and pain are also closely linked; so music’s impact on stress reduction may also partly explain the effects. However, it’s unlikely that music’s impact is due to a simple placebo effect. In a 2014 randomized control trial involving healthy subjects exposed to painful stimuli, researchers failed to find a link between expectation and music’s effects on pain. The researchers concluded that music is a robust analgesic whose properties are not due simply to expectation factors. ---3: Music may improve immune functioning: Can listening to music actually help prevent disease? Some researchers think so. Wilkes University researchers looked at how music affects levels of IgA—an important antibody for our immune system’s first line of defense against disease. Undergraduate students had their salivary IgA levels measured before and after 30 minutes of exposure to one of four conditions—listening to a tone click, a radio broadcast, a tape of soothing music, or silence. Those students exposed to the soothing music had significantly greater increases in IgA than any of the other conditions, suggesting that exposure to music (and not other sounds) might improve innate immunity. Another study from Massachusetts General Hospital found that listening to Mozart’s piano sonatas helped relax critically ill patients by lowering stress hormone levels, but the music also decreased blood levels of interleukin-6—a protein that has been implicated in higher mortality rates, diabetes, and heart problems. According to a 2013 meta-analysis, authors Mona Lisa Chanda and Daniel Levitin concluded that music has the potential to augment immune response systems, but that the findings to date are preliminary. Still, as Levitin notes in one article on the study, ‘I think the promise of music as medicine is that it’s natural and it’s cheap and it doesn’t have the unwanted side effects that many pharmaceutical products do.’ ---4: Music may aid memory: My now-teenage son always listens to music while he studies. Far from being a distraction to him, he claims it helps him remember better when it comes to test time. Now research may prove him right—and provide an insight that could help people suffering from dementia. Music enjoyment elicits dopamine release, and dopamine release has been tied to motivation, which in turn is implicated in learning and memory. In a study published last year, adult students studying Hungarian were asked to speak, or speak in a rhythmic fashion, or sing phrases in the unfamiliar language. Afterwards, when asked to recall the foreign phrases, the singing group fared significantly better than the other two groups in recall accuracy. Evidence that music helps with memory has led researchers to study the impact of music on special populations, such as those who suffer memory loss due to illness. In a 2008 experiment, stroke patients who were going through rehab were randomly assigned to listen daily either to self-selected music, to an audio book, or to nothing (in addition to receiving their usual care). The patients were then tested on mood, quality of life, and several cognitive measures at one week, three months, and 6 months post-stroke. Results showed that those in the music group improved significantly more on verbal memory and focused attention than those in the other groups, and they were less depressed and confused than controls at each measuring point. In a more recent study, caregivers and patients with dementia were randomly given 10 weeks of singing coaching, 10 weeks of music listening coaching, or neither. Afterwards, testing showed that singing and music listening improved mood, orientation, and memory and, to a lesser extent, attention and executive functioning, as well as providing other benefits. Studies like these have encouraged a movement to incorporate music into patient care for dementia patients, in part promoted by organizations like Music and Memory. ---5: Music helps us exercise: How many of us listen to rock and roll or other upbeat music while working out? It turns out that research supports what we instinctively feel: music helps us get a more bang for our exercise buck. Researchers in the United Kingdom recruited thirty participants to listen to motivational synchronized music, non-motivational synchronized music, or no music while they walked on a treadmill until they reached exhaustion levels. Measurements showed that both music conditions increased the length of time participants worked out (though motivational music increased it significantly more) when compared to controls. The participants who listened to motivational music also said they felt better during their work out than those in the other two conditions. In another study, oxygen consumption levels were measured while people listened to different tempos of music during their exercise on a stationary bike. Results showed that when exercisers listened to music with a beat that was faster and synchronous with their movement, their bodies used up oxygen more efficiently than when the music played at a slower, unsynchronized tempo. According to sports researchers Peter Terry and Costas Karageorghis, ‘Music has the capacity to capture attention, lift spirits, generate emotion, change or regulate mood, evoke memories, increase work output, reduce inhibitions, and encourage rhythmic movement – all of which have potential applications in sport and exercise.’" - Jill Suttie
January 20, 2015 [Refer http://greatergood.berkeley.edu/article/item/five_ways_music_can_make_you_healthier? ]
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[Quote No.53908] Need Area: Body > Health
"...health: enjoy it when good, be patient when it is bad, and never apply violent remedies except in an extreme necessity." - Francois Duc de La Rochefoucauld
(1613 - 1680)
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[Quote No.54052] Need Area: Body > Health
"Let the doctor tell me I shall die unless I do so-and-so; but whether life is worth having on those terms is no more a question for him than for any other man. [Information and education about consequences is of great benefit but it is still the individual in a free society that is responsible for choosing what they do which effects only their life, liberty and pursuit of happiness; namely informed consent or life without fraud or force are required to make the most of individual freedom and personal responsibility after reaching the age of reason and therefore consent!]" - C. S. Lewis
(1898-1963), British novelist. Source: 'Willing Slaves of the Welfare State', first published in 'The Observer' on July 20, 1958.
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[Quote No.54131] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about perseverance and dogged determination regardless of disabilities, real pain and reasonable excuses:] Frida Kahlo: Frida Kahlo, a Mexican painter, suffered physically debilitating conditions for much of her life. As a child, she had polio, leaving her right leg and foot damaged. While she was a young woman attending art school in Mexico City, a steel handrail drove through her pelvis during a collision between the bus she was riding and a streetcar. She had several miscarriages as a result of this accident. As physicians attempted to heal her shattered body, she underwent more than 30 surgeries. She painted even while most of her body was immobilized due to being bedridden or wearing a full-body cast. She drew on the physical and emotional pain she experienced as the subject of several of her 143 paintings. One of her paintings hangs in the Louvre, and she has been depicted on postage stamps in both the United States and Mexico." - Tara Green
eHow Contributor. [Refer http://www.ehow.com/info_8053170_inspirational-stories-perseverance.html ]
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[Quote No.54144] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story: about persistence past failure, criticism and disappointment, even severe health issues, to achieve success:] J. K. Rowling: Rowling considered herself as ‘the biggest failure [she] knew.’ She had no job, she had just ended an allegedly abusive marriage, she was diagnosed as clinically depressed, she also had a baby, and she was living off welfare benefits. But to her, her failure was liberating, ‘I was set free, because my greatest fear had been realized, and I was still alive, and I still had a daughter whom I adored, and I had an old typewriter, and a big idea. And so rock bottom became a solid foundation on which I rebuilt my life.’ " - Michael Alarcon
[Refer http://www.ehow.com/ehow-extras/blog/8-famous-failures-and-how-they-overcame-their-setbacks/ ]
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[Quote No.54147] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story – with a message that inspires about courage, persistence and compassion for others and not letting health problems or disabilities stop you from trying to achieve your dreams:] Terrance Stanley ‘Terry’ Fox CC OD (July 28, 1958 – June 28, 1981) was a Canadian athlete, humanitarian, and cancer research activist. In 1980, with one leg having been amputated, he embarked on a cross-Canada run [The Marathon of Hope] to raise money and awareness for cancer research. Although the spread of his CANCER EVENTUALLY FORCED HIM TO END HIS QUEST AFTER 143 DAYS AND 5,373 KILOMETRES (3,339 MI), and ultimately cost him his life, his efforts resulted in a lasting, worldwide legacy. The annual Terry Fox Run, first held in 1981, has grown to involve millions of participants in over 60 countries and is now the world's largest one-day fundraiser for cancer research; over C$600 million has been raised in his name. Fox was a distance runner and basketball player for his Port Coquitlam, British Columbia, high school and Simon Fraser University. His right leg was amputated in 1977 after he was diagnosed with osteosarcoma, though he continued to run using an artificial leg. He also played wheelchair basketball in Vancouver, winning three national championships. In 1980, he began the Marathon of Hope, a cross-country run to raise money for cancer research. He hoped to raise one dollar for each of Canada's 24 million people. He began with little fanfare from St. John's, Newfoundland in April and RAN THE EQUIVALENT OF A FULL MARATHON EVERY DAY. Fox had become a national star by the time he reached Ontario; he made numerous public appearances with businessmen, athletes, and politicians in his efforts to raise money. He was forced to end his run outside of Thunder Bay when the cancer spread to his lungs. His hopes of overcoming the disease and completing his marathon ended when he died nine months later. He was the youngest person ever named a Companion of the Order of Canada. He won the 1980 Lou Marsh Award as the nation's top sportsman and was named Canada's Newsmaker of the Year in both 1980 and 1981. Considered a national hero, he has had many buildings, roads and parks named in his honour across the country." - Unknown
[Refer http://www.totalprosports.com/2011/11/21/9-inspirational-sports-stories/ ]
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[Quote No.54150] Need Area: Body > Health
"[True story: about persisting past mental and physical health issues, language difficulties, failure, criticism, disappointment, etc to eventually achieve success:]

----- #4. ----- Roget Invented the Thesaurus at Age 73: It's not that Peter Roget went through life broke. By age 61, he was an accomplished doctor, lecturer and inventor. He was a respected man of science. He was also, however, pretty insane and most definitely miserable. Which is standard for people who spend their days studying kaleidoscopes, we guess. === The Rock Bottom Moment: Being nuts, it turns out, was in his blood: His grandmother was mentally unstable, his mother was nearly psychotic and his sister and daughter had suffered severe mental breakdowns. As if that wasn't enough, his father and wife died young, and one time his uncle slit his throat in front of him. Peter was actually the sane one in the family, or as it was known to people who weren't in his family, ‘still crazier than a shit house rat.’ Roget himself was described as ‘humorless and judgmental’ and a little bit paranoid. His obsessive personality slowly took over his life and led him to, for example, count his steps every day. He was also obsessed with cleanliness ... which was unfortunate, because he lived in 19th century London, which had no clean water or toilets. Civilization didn't beat out nomadic tribalism with the invention of the British accent. The only thing that seemed to calm him was making lists, a somewhat creepy hobby he'd had since childhood. When he retired from medicine at 61, he realized he might as well spend all day making one huge, all-encompassing list of all the things ever -- so that's exactly what he did. === The Success: Twelve years later, at age 73, Peter Roget published his giant list of words as a book, ‘Roget's Thesaurus of English Words and Phrases’ ... otherwise known as ‘the thesaurus.’ Or ‘wordbook’ or ‘phrasehouse’ or ‘table-leg prop.’ Back in 1805, he had compiled a small indexed catalog of words for personal use, presumably to help him cheat in crossword puzzles. Roget kept building on his initial list over the years, but only as a pointless hobby, because as we explained before, he was pretty much insane. It wasn't until he retired that he decided to devote himself seriously to creating a collection of synonyms and antonyms that writers could use as an easy reference. The thesaurus was an instant success and made Roget's name synonymous with, well, synonyms. He kept working on it until his death at age 90, and in the meantime managed to not kill himself or anyone else. Pretty impressive, we think. Look out! He's going to off, rub-out, liquidate or slay somebody!

----- #3. ----- The Author of the Book Behind ‘Apocalypse Now’ Was a Sailor, Drifter and Part-Time Criminal Until Age 37: Now it's true that a lot of writers don't publish their big novel until after a lot of years of trying. In the days before everybody had a blog, you'd maybe get your English degree and then write some short stories that get published in some magazine, or take work writing greeting cards -- whatever pays the bills. But others, well, they take a more roundabout approach. === The Rock Bottom Moment: In 1878, Jozef Teodor Konrad Nalecz Korzeniowski, a young Polish sailor working for the French marine service, tried to commit suicide by shooting himself in the chest. The reason? Pick one: His family was exiled from his country, he was orphaned by age 11, he was involved in a gun smuggling plot, he had just gone through a disastrous love affair that apparently ended in a duel and his gambling had left him riddled by debt. So he tried to shoot himself. The bullet didn't seem to hit anything important, though, so Jozef shrugged it off and kept working. In the same year, he joined the British Merchant Marines, even though he was already in his 20s and didn't know a word of English. Over the following decade, Jozef slowly picked up on the language during his many voyages around the world -- which, by the way, he barely survived. English is a notoriously dangerous language. A trip to Congo in 1890, for example, left him physically and psychologically drained. During his tour of Africa, Jozef witnessed enough horror and evil to shatter anyone's faith in humanity. It was almost like in ‘Apocalypse Now’. === The Success: No, wait, it was exactly like ‘Apocalypse Now’ -- he wrote it. All that shit Martin Sheen's character goes through in the movie is based on Jozef's own experiences as a merchant sailor in the Congo, which Francis Ford Coppola updated to the Vietnam War for the film. The book's surfing scene was left unchanged. You see, after 20 years of being a full-time sailor, one day Jozef decided to switch careers and become a novelist. He published his first novel in 1894, at age 37, under a name you are slightly more likely to recognize: ‘Joseph Conrad.’ This didn't exactly come out of nowhere: His father had tried to instil in him a love of literature before, you know, dying, and Conrad's life going to shit for the next 30 years gave him some material to work with. In 1899, Conrad began publishing ‘Heart of Darkness’, the novel that ‘Apocalypse Now’ is based on, and by the early 20th century he was recognized as one of the most important writers in the English language -- a language he didn't even speak until adulthood and that, perhaps most impressively, he apparently taught himself while listening to sailors.

" - Simon Dufresne and Dylan Moore
Published January 27, 2012. [Refer http://www.cracked.com/article_19655_5-famous-late-bloomers_p2.html ]
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[Quote No.54399] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about persisting past difficulties, including health and wealth challenges, to find career success and go from 'rags-to-riches':-] - Joni Mitchell - At the age of eight, Joni Mitchell, the Canadian singer-songwriter who was born November 7, 1943, contracted polio during the last major North American epidemic of the disease before the invention of the polio vaccine. Bedridden for weeks, with a prognosis of never being able to walk again, she found hope in singing during that harrowing time at the hospital a hundred miles from her home. And yet she did walk again – an extraordinary walk of life that overcame polio, and overcame poverty, and pernicious critics to make Mitchell one of the most original and influential musicians in modern history, the recipient of eight Grammy Awards, including one for Lifetime Achievement." - Unknown

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[Quote No.54401] Need Area: Body > Health
"[A true story - with a message about persisting past difficulties, including health and wealth challenges, to find career success and go from 'rags-to-riches':] - Johnny Cash - Johnny Cash, the American country singer, was born in Arkansaw in 1932 during the American depression. Rural living was hard and the Cash family was dirt poor. His father rode the rails traveling the length and breath of the country by train in search of work. Johnny started working in the cotton fields at age five, singing along with his family while working. From the age of twelve he began playing and writing songs. Throughout his career he suffered from periods of severe drug addictions and was suicidal at least on one occasion. Despite this his work ethic was legendary and his contribution to music immense." - Unknown

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[Quote No.54607] Need Area: Body > Health
"Divine is the task to relieve pain." - Hippocrates

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[Quote No.55204] Need Area: Body > Health
"What cannot be cured, Must be endured." - Thomas Fuller, M. D.
(1654 - 1734)
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[Quote No.55605] Need Area: Body > Health
"...hate, in the long run, is about as nourishing as cyanide." - Kurt Vonnegut
[http://www.brainpickings.org/2014/05/12/kurt-vonnegut-if-this-isnt-nice-fredonia/? ]
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[Quote No.57095] Need Area: Body > Health
"Nature heals, the doctor helps!" - Paracelsus

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[Quote No.57096] Need Area: Body > Health
"Everyone has a doctor in him; we just have to help him in his work. The natural healing force within each one of us is the greatest force in getting well." - Hippocrates

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[Quote No.57623] Need Area: Body > Health
"For all your ills I give you laughter!" - Francois Rabelais
(1494 - 1553), a major French Renaissance writer, physician, Renaissance humanist, monk and Greek scholar. He has historically been regarded as a writer of fantasy, satire, the grotesque, bawdy jokes and songs.
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[Quote No.57693] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Are you looking at how to be grateful that your life is not worse or bitter that your life is not better? Because it makes a big difference to how positive and happy your life will be! For example:] I met a person who was in a wheelchair. He related a story about how a person once asked if it was difficult to be confined to a wheelchair. He responded, 'I'm not confined to my wheelchair - I am liberated by it. If it wasn't for my wheelchair, I would be bed-bound and never able to leave my room or house.'" - Unknown

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[Quote No.57846] Need Area: Body > Health
"A merry heart doeth good like a medicine: but a broken spirit drieth the bones!" - Bible, Proverbs 17:22

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[Quote No.58183] Need Area: Body > Health
"Good health: It is much easier kept than regained." - Dr. Phil McGraw
Psychologist, TV personality and author
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[Quote No.58782] Need Area: Body > Health
"For a 'rich' life remember 'health is wealth' (as in wellth)." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.58858] Need Area: Body > Health
"Health comes from healthy living!" - Dr. Michael Klaper

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[Quote No.58859] Need Area: Body > Health
"With few exceptions, (accidents do happen!) our daily choices - the foods we eat (or don't eat), the activities we do (or don't do), the thoughts we harbor (or release), the actions we take (or don't take) are what create the body in which we reside, and determine if it is healthy or diseased. The adage 'By age 20 you have the face that Nature gave you; by age 50, you have the face your choices gave you' is, indeed, true - and holds throughout the body. By age 50, we have the arteries, the heart, the skin, the colon and the brain that our choices have given us." - Dr. Michael Klaper
[http://doctorklaper.com/about/ ]
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[Quote No.58860] Need Area: Body > Health
"...nutrition is the master key to human health." - T. Colin Campbell
Quote from his book, 'Whole: Rethinking the Science of Nutrition'.
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[Quote No.58865] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Good nutrition is vital for good health and active longevity:] 'What's on Your Fork Now Determines Your Health Later' - Baseball legend Mickey Mantle once said, 'If I'd known I was going to live this long, I'd have taken better care of myself.' Like all memorable quotes, it's a mix of clever wording and a universal truth: the poor diet and lifestyle choices of our youth start to catch up with us as we age. But the good news is that embracing a healthful lifestyle, including a nutrient-dense, plant-rich diet, can allow us to maintain optimal health and achieve enhanced longevity. We get older with every tick of the clock. But we have the power to decide how we want to age: with vitality, living life with gusto, full of energy and with our faculties intact; or in pain, beset by chronic (and preventable) diseases such as arthritis, atherosclerosis, hypertension, diabetes and dementia. Aging itself is not the primary cause of these common illnesses; the cause is predominately one's diet. Those types of diseases develop over many years of eating a less-than-ideal diet. In the United States, as in other developed countries, too much of the food that is consumed has almost no nutritional value. I am talking about highly processed foods that are often refered to as 'empty calories' because they are so low in micronutrients. These are products, not whole foods. Eating commercial baked goods, snack foods, luncheon meats, ice cream, soda, and oils, is dangerous. They are usually made with sweeteners, white flour or loaded with sodium. Our addiction to these high-calorie, low-nutrient foods have led to astronomically high rates of obesity, cancer, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. But it doesn't have to be this way. Heart disease, dementia, diabetes, and even cancer do not have to be the inevitable consequence of aging. It is possible to live a long life, free from disability and chronic disease if we eat a nutrient-dense, plant-rich diet, with little if any refined foods and minimal amounts of animal products. I call this way of eating a Nutritarian diet, to represent the healthiest way to eat in the world. There are many advantages to adopting the Nutritarian eating style: --- When you eat low-calorie, high-nutrient foods, you can eat abundantly. --- A diet based on greens, vegetables, beans, nuts, seeds, and fruit defends against cancer. --- Eating a nutrient-dense, plant-rich diet can keep you slim. Eat big salads that contain lots of leafy greens, and include tomatoes, raw onions, dressed with a nut-seed based dressing. Chew your foods thoroughly to breakdown its cellular walls to release as many of the nutrients as possible. Avoid excessive amounts of oils and animal products – if you do use them, don't eat them often — only in small amounts, like a condiment, a few times a week, or two or three times a month. My primary goal, throughout my career as a physician and nutritional researcher, has been to help people recognize the direct connection between food and health. We have a unique opportunity to live longer and more healthfully than ever before. We can age gracefully, free of the common diseases associated with aging. Thousands of scientific studies have been published to support eating this way. By utilizing these advances in nutritional science, I have enabled thousands of people to reverse their chronic disease, lower their weight, blood pressure and cholesterol to normal, without drugs, and to restore their health and vitality. Today is the day for you to begin if you have not already. I urge everyone to learn the principles of this style of eating. This is not about deprivation. It is a delicious, satisfying and sensible way to enjoy eating as we increase our ability to live a fuller, healthier and longer life. Commit to taking better care of yourself today. You'll not only reap immediate rewards – you'll also give yourself the chance to enjoy a long and healthy future." - Dr Joel Fuhrman
May 20, 2016. [https://www.drfuhrman.com/lifestyle/eat-to-live-blog/2/whats-on-your-fork-now-determines-your-health-later ]
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[Quote No.58878] Need Area: Body > Health
"[Cardio-vascular health to reduce the risk of arteriosclerosis, heart disease, hypertension, stroke, dementia, etc:] 'Exploring 'The Great Cholesterol Myth' - I have a strong interest in the prevention of heart disease. I believe healthy nutrition and lifestyle are the key to our health and well being. In my early career as a cardiologist, working in the hospital setting, I was fascinated by the diagnosis and treatment of heart disease. Don't misunderstand me, I still am. However, as the years have passed I have become more and more interested in disease prevention. Helping people stay healthy and avoid disease is very different from diagnosing and treating. Nonetheless, although prevention is important, it is not always easy to practice. It's time consuming, results are hard to measure and it deserves both patience and persistence. Therefore, it's not surprising that doctors are often less interested in prevention than treating and curing. Let me quote Dr. Bernard Lown from his blog, The Lown Conversation: 'Diligent prevention unfortunately plays second fiddle to heroic cures.' I believe the most powerful tool to cut the burden of heart disease in our community is education. The remarkable Maya Angelou said: 'When you know better you do better'. One of the most important roles for doctors and other medical professionals is educating people about healthy lifestyle, nutrition, exercise and other measures to prevent disease. All things considered, education is a double-edged sword. Bad education is often worse than no education. A huge number of books and articles have been written on lifestyle, exercise, diet and nutrition, and there is an overflow of information on the internet. Obviously, some of it is good and some of it is bad. In many cases, education and information is driven by a product line designed to enrich the bank account of the author. Obviously, such information may be misleading. Much has been said and written about the role of cholesterol in heart disease. Elevated cholesterol is considered a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Lowering cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in particular, is of key importance. Recently however, the role of cholesterol in heart disease has been debated. A few weeks ago a ran into a new book on the subject, called 'The Great Cholesterol Myth' written by nutritionist Jonny Bowden, PhD, and cardiologist Stephen Sinatra, MD. At first sight I wasn't interested in the book. There are so many similar books I thought: 'The Cholesterol Myths' by Uffe Ravnskog, 'The Great Cholesterol Con' by Malcolm Kendrick, 'The Great Cholesterol Con' by Antonio Colpo and 'The Great Cholesterol Lie' by Dwight Lundell. Sounds pretty boring. However I decided to give Bowden's and Sinatra's book a chance. --- Cholesterol and Heart Disease – Can We Ignore Contradictory Evidence? The role of cholesterol in atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease is often debated. In my opinion, the so-called lipid hypothesis is an oversimplification of a complex disorder. Sometimes we debate because we disagree on how to simplify complex mechanisms. Cholesterol is just one of many players in the atherosclerotic process. The main reason it has become such a popular player is that it is easy to measure, not because it plays the main role. However, medical debates are often quite interesting, and they may actually have some positives. They often provoke lively discussions, and they may stimulate scientific research. The downside is that if you have already chosen a side, you run the risk of neglecting, or not choosing to accept scientific results or arguments that don’t support your own opinion. There are different ways for authors to present a hypothesis they believe is true. You can choose to present all available data, and then make an argument for the data you believe support your hypothesis. Such a balanced, informative approach is honest, and it gives the reader a chance to make up his own mind. However, it doesn't necessarily catch the attention of the news media or make the headlines. If you believe you've found the truth, you may prefer to select data that reinforce your own beliefs. We could call this the preacher's approach. There is no reason to discuss any contradictory evidence. That's just confusing. In my opinion, the recent book by Bowden and Sinatra is a good example of the preachers approach. Somehow the authors believe they've managed to unlock the hidden truth. In fact you may admire how fearlessly they expose, what they call the misinformation fed by the scientific community. Let me quote the first sentence of the first chapter: 'The two of us came together to write this book because we believe that you have been completely misled, misinformed, and in some cases directly lied to about cholesterol'. Interesting and provoking. Conspiracy theories are likely to get media attention. I presume that's a part of the procedure. Somehow, we like to read about how we have been cheated and mislead. Consequently, if you manage to convince people they've been cheated, they're more likely to listen to your theories and arguments. While reading 'The Great Cholesterol Myth', I had this strong urge that I had to play the devil's advocate. It's not necessarily because I dislike the book or disagree with everything the authors write. On the contrary, I think they have some great tips on healthy lifestyle and diet. It's just because I believe people have the right to hear both sides of the story, and then make up their own mind. I'm not a book critique, so whether I liked the book or not is irrelevant. However, taking on the role of the devil's advocate I want to bring forward some of my thoughts while reading the book. --- 'Cholesterol Does Not Cause Heart Disease' – The Main Arguments: In the first two chapters the role of cholesterol in heart disease is discussed. The authors believe that cholesterol numbers are a poor predictor of heart disease. They point out that more than half of the people hospitalized with heart attacks have what they call 'perfectly normal cholesterol levels'. The importance of cholesterol for different bodily functions is underlined. The message is; because cholesterol is essential for life it can't be bad. Let me quote the book: 'Both of us became skeptical of the cholesterol theory at different points in our careers, traveling different pathways to arrive at the same conclusion: Cholesterol does not cause heart disease.' The second chapter is called 'Cholesterol is harmless'. In this chapter the people who write the special reports and guidelines, meant to help doctors make treatment decisions get a fierce amount of critique. A quote from the book: 'When the National Cholesterol Education Program lowered the optimal cholesterol levels in 2004, eight of the nine people on the panel had financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry, most of them to the manufacturers of cholesterol-lowering drugs who would subsequently reap immediate benefits from these same recommendations'. Atherosclerosis is the underlying cause of cardiovascular disease. It leads to the building of plaques within the walls of our arteries. These plaques are composed of several substances, among them is cholesterol. Atherosclerosis typically affects the coronary arteries, the vessels supplying blood to the heart muscle. In medical school I was taught that the exact cause of atherosclerosis was unknown. However, there were certain risk factors, which if present increased the likelihood of developing atherosclerosis and coronary artery disease. The main risk factors were family history of heart disease, smoking, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, diabetes and obesity. None of these risk factors was considered to be the cause of heart disease. However, by modifying the risk factors, the likelihood of developing heart disease could be reduced. I have never believed that cholesterol is the sole cause of heart disease. However, it is certainly involved, and it is quite clear that cardiovascular disease as we know it would not exist if cholesterol was not present. Is a tsunami caused by water? No, but it won't happen without it. Is heart disease caused by cholesterol? No, but it won't occur without it. The fact that cholesterol is a very important biologic substance and essential to life, does not prove that high levels may not promote a disease process. There are many examples of this phenomenon. Iron for example has important biologic functions. However high levels of iron in the body can cause a disease called haemochromatosis. Although insulin is essential for our metabolism, research indicates that high levels are undesirable and may promote obesity. A certain level of blood glucose is essential for life. If we don't get glucose through our diet, the body produces it. However, high blood levels of glucose are undesirable and associated with the disease we call diabetes. So, although cholesterol is an important biologic substance, high levels could certainly be associated with disease. In animal models, atherosclerosis does not occur in the absence of greatly elevated blood cholesterol. Furthermore, heart attacks have been shown to be uncommon in humans with very low plasma levels of LDL cholesterol due to a sequence variation in the PCSK9 gene. In cell cultures, according to Nobel prize winners Brown and Goldstein, cellular needs for cholesterol can be met with an LDL [Low Density Lipoprotein as opposed to HDL High Density Lipoprotein] cholesterol level of 25 mg/dl (0.65 mmol/L). Human newborns have an LDL cholesterol in the range of 40-50 mg/dl (1.1-1.3 mmol/L). Healthy adult levels are 3-4 times higher. The normal LDL cholesterol range is 50 to 70 mg/dl (1.3-1.5 mmol/L) for native hunter-gatherers, healthy human newborns, free-living primates, and other wild mammals, all of whom do not develop atherosclerosis. Randomized trial data suggest atherosclerosis progression and coronary heart disease events are minimized when LDL is lowered to <70 mg/dl (1.8 mmol/L). No major safety concerns have surfaced in studies that lowered LDL to the range of 50 to 70 mg/dl. Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a disorder characterized by high cholesterol levels, specifically levels of LDL-cholesterol. Many individuals with this disorder die prematurely of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. I have found no mention of this disorder in Bowden's and Sinatra's book. The most common problem in FH is the development of coronary artery disease at a much younger age than would be expected in the general population. So, try telling a thirty year old woman with FH, and an acute heart attack that cholesterol is harmless. Statin drugs have improved prognosis and quality of life in patients with FH. It is important to emphasize, that it is lipoproteins that interact with the arterial wall and initiate the cascade of events that leads to atherosclerosis. Cholesterol is only one of many components of lipoproteins. LDL, the major carrier of cholesterol in the circulation, is the most atherogenic lipoprotein. High levels of LDL in the blood may lead to increased transport of this substance into the vessel wall. When inside the arterial wall, LDL can undergo a variety of modifications including oxidation, uptake by white blood cells called macrophages, formation of so-called foam cells and the initiation of inflammation. This cascade of events may ultimately result in an atherosclerotic plaque within the vessel wall. Obviously, cholesterol is not the cause of all this, but it is always involved. So, could it be that atherosclerosis is more likely to occur if plasma concentration of LDL-cholesterol is high than if it is low. The answer is yes. A number of scientific studies indicate that this is definitively the case. However, this does not mean that cholesterol causes heart disease. That's an oversimplification. --- What Else Is Important? The authors claim that inflammation is the true cause of heart disease. Let me quote the book: 'So if cholesterol isn't the cause of heart disease, what is? The primary cause of heart disease is inflammation'. The authors point out that chronic inflammation is a significant component of virtually every single degenerative condition, including heart disease, Alzheimer's, diabetes, obesity, arthritis, cancer, and many other diseases. They believe oxidation is an important contributor to inflammation and atherosclerosis. Bowden and Sinatra consider the size of the atherogenic LDL particles to be important. Thus, the more of the large fluffy particles, the better. The more of the small dense particles, the higher your risk. They even suggest these parameters may be considered the 'new good and bad' cholesterol, instead of the traditional HDL [good] and LDL [bad] cholesterol. Nature is complex and so are biological mechanisms that control bodily functions. A disease often occurs during specific conditions that involve many different biological pathways. Of course environmental and genetic factors play a role as well. So, why should there be a one simple cause of heart disease such as chronic inflammation or cholesterol? Isn't it more likely that lipoproteins, cholesterol, oxidation, inflammation and many other factors are all involved at the same time? So, again, we may disagree because our methods of simplifying complex mechanisms are different. An association between LDL particle size and cardiovascular risk has been found in some studies. However, measurements reflecting the number of LDL particles appear to be a stronger predictor of risk than particle size in itself. LDL-P and apolipoprotein B reflect the number of LDL-particles. Interestingly, patients with FH usually have large LDL-particles, but their risk of heart disease is very high, and so is their LDL-particle number. It is likely that the association between small LDL and heart disease reflects an increased number of LDL particles in patients with small particles. Therefore, particle size in itself may be unimportant. Bowden and Sinatra say the benefits of statin drugs have been widely exaggerated. Furthermore, they believe the side effects of these drugs to be much more common than previously thought. They point out that statin therapy may be associated with cancer and diabetes. Other common side effects may be memory problems, lack of energy and sexual dysfunction. They believe that much of the side effects of statin therapy may be traced to depletion of coenzyme Q-10. Dr. Sinatra only uses statin drugs for high risk middle aged men. I share some of the authors thoughts on statin therapy. I think side effects are underreported and doctors should be much more alert on the possible adverse effects on muscle, diabetes risk, energy, memory and cognitive function. However, most people tolerate statin therapy quite well. Furthermore, I believe these drugs certainly reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with documented cardiovascular disease, and in many high risk individuals without disease. However, in my opinion statins are used too often in low risk patients. We, doctors should take time to inform these low risk individuals about possible alternatives to statin therapy, such as diet, exercise and healthy lifestyle. Interestingly, the chapter on statin therapy ends with a final cautionary note, let me quote: 'Look, there's not much doubt that statin therapy can significantly reduce the incidence of coronary morbidity and mortality for those who are at great risks of developing coronary artery disease'. Here I definitively agree with Dr. Bowden and Dr. Sinatra, but I have to wonder if they disagree with themselves. --- How About the Supplements? The seventh chapter of the book is called 'Help your heart with these supplements', and deals with different nutritional supplements. There are a number of supplements the authors believe improve the health of our hearts. Among these are coenzyme Q10, which the authors call the spark of life, D-ribose, L-carnitine, magnesium, niacin, vitamin E, fish oils and Omega-3. Interesting list, but somehow I could not help thinking that, if the authors owned companies that were selling these products on-line [which they do, as can be confirmed by a simple internet search], it would seriously affect the credibility of the book and reduce its educative value. However, keeping in mind the they believe that the lipid hypothesis is kept alive by medical professionals getting paid by pharmaceutical companies, I will have to assume that Dr. Bowden and Dr. Sinatra have no conflict of interest. Dr. Axel F. Sigurdsson Dr. Sigurdsson is a cardiologist at the Department of Cardiology at The Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik Iceland. He also practices cardiology at Hjartamidstodin (The Heart Center) which is a private heart clinic in the Reykjavik area. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), The Icelandic Society of Cardiology and the Swedish Society of Cardiology. Dr. Sigurdsson is a specialist in internal medicine and cardiology. He did his cardiology training at the Sahlgrenska/Östra University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden and at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria BC, Canada between 1988 – 1996. He is past president of the Icelandic Cardiac Society. Dr. Sigurdsson main interest has been in the field of coronary heart disease and heart failure. He has published more than 100 scientific abstracts, articles and book chapters in international journals and text books. Published January 28, 2013. [http://www.docsopinion.com/2013/01/28/the-great-cholesterol-myth/ and http://www.drsinatra.com/shop-vitamins-supplements-1/ ]" - Dr. Axel F. Sigurdsson
Dr. Sigurdsson is a cardiologist at the Department of Cardiology at The Landspitali University Hospital in Reykjavik Iceland. He also practices cardiology at Hjartamidstodin (The Heart Center) which is a private heart clinic in the Reykjavik area. He is a Fellow of the American College of Cardiology (ACC), The Icelandic Society of Cardiology and the Swedish Society of Cardiology. Dr. Sigurdsson is a specialist in internal medicine and cardiology. He did his cardiology training at the Sahlgrenska/Östra University Hospital in Gothenburg, Sweden and at the Royal Jubilee Hospital in Victoria BC, Canada between 1988 – 1996. He is past president of the Icelandic Cardiac Society. Dr. Sigurdsson main interest has been in the field of coronary heart disease and heart failure. He has published more than 100 scientific abstracts, articles and book chapters in international journals and text books. Published January 28, 2013. [http://www.docsopinion.com/2013/01/28/the-great-cholesterol-myth/ and http://www.drsinatra.com/shop-vitamins-supplements-1/ ]
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