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  Quotations - Learn  
[Quote No.52403] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Your level of success will seldom exceed your level of personal development." - Jim Rohn

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[Quote No.52416] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[A true story - with a message about preparation.] - The Moso Bamboo Tree - The Moso is a bamboo plant that grows in China and the far east. After the moso is planted, no visible growth occurs for up to five years - event under ideal conditions! Then, as if by magic, it suddenly begins growing at the rate of nearly two and one half feet per day, reaching a full height of ninety feet within six weeks. But it's not magic. The moso's rapid growth is due to the miles of roots it develops during those first five years, five years of getting ready." - Joel Weldon

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[Quote No.53600] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Freedom of thought, speech, expression, press and censorship:] To limit the press is to insult a nation; to prohibit reading of certain books is to declare the inhabitants to be either fools or knaves." - Claude-Adrien Helvetius
(1715-1771). Source: 'On The Mind'.
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[Quote No.52487] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[A poem: about freedom of thought, speech, education and press.]

'Where The Mind Is Without Fear'

Where the mind is without fear and the head is held high
Where knowledge is free
Where the world has not been broken up into fragments
By narrow domestic walls
Where words come out from the depth of truth
Where tireless striving stretches its arms towards perfection
Where the clear stream of reason has not lost its way
Into the dreary desert sand of dead habit
Where the mind is led forward by thee
Into ever-widening thought and action
Into that heaven of freedom, my Father, let my country awake

" - Rabindranath Tagore

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[Quote No.52574] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Fear as in False Evidence Appearing Real and] ... Ignorance made me forlorn ... [forlorn - adjective - 1. desolate or dreary; unhappy or miserable, as in feeling, condition, or appearance. 2. lonely and sad; forsaken. 3. expressive of hopelessness; despairing: 'forlorn glances.' 4. bereft; destitute: 'forlorn of comfort.']" - Allen Ginsberg
American poet and leading apostle of the beat generation. His first published work, 'Howl and Other Poems' (1956), sparked the San Francisco Renaissance and defined the generation of the '50s with an authority and vision that had not occurred in the United States since T. S. Eliot captured the anxiety of the 1920s in 'The Waste Land'. This quote is a line from his poem, 'Father Death Blues'.
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[Quote No.52589] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about learning empathy and compassion, and other important virtues, as 'the blessings in disguise' or 'the silver linings' of adversity, problems, pain, frustration, challenges, mistakes, etc.]

'Hymn to Adversity'

Daughter of Jove, relentless power,
Thou tamer of the human breast,
Whose iron scourge and torturing hour
The bad affright, afflict the best!
Bound in thy adamantine chain
The proud are taught to taste of pain,
And purple tyrants vainly groan
With pangs unfelt before, unpitied and alone.

When first thy Sire to send on earth
Virtue, his darling child, design’d,
To thee he gave the heavenly birth
And bade to form her infant mind.
Stern, rugged Nurse! thy rigid lore
With patience many a year she bore;
What sorrow was, thou bad’st her know,
And from her own she learn’d to melt at others’ woe.

Scared at thy frown terrific, fly
Self-pleasing Folly’s idle brood,
Wild Laughter, Noise, and thoughtless Joy,
And leave us leisure to be good.
Light they disperse, and with them go
The summer Friend, the flattering Foe;
By vain Prosperity received,
To her they vow their truth, and are again believed.

Wisdom in sable garb array’d
Immersed in rapturous thought profound,
And Melancholy, silent maid,
With leaden eye, that loves the ground,
Still on thy solemn steps attend:
Warm Charity, the general friend,
With Justice, to herself severe,
And Pity dropping soft the sadly-pleasing tear.

O! gently on thy suppliant’s head
Dread Goddess, lay thy chastening hand!
Not in thy Gorgon terrors clad,
Nor circled with the vengeful band
(As by the impious thou art seen)
With thundering voice, and threatening mien,
With screaming Horror’s funeral cry,
Despair, and fell Disease, and ghastly Poverty;-

Thy form benign, O Goddess, wear,
Thy milder influence impart,
Thy philosophic train be there
To soften, not to wound my heart.
The generous spark extinct revive,
Teach me to love and to forgive
Exact my own defects to scan,
What others are to feel, and know myself a Man.

" - Thomas Gray
(1716 – 1771), English poet, letter-writer, classical scholar and professor at Cambridge University.
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[Quote No.52604] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"When good things happen we are happy and grateful. When bad things happen, be grateful they are not worse and try to make them into good things - perhaps by learning from it so the future will be better for all. For example, if you are given an adversity turn it into an advantage, a burden into a benefit, a challenge into a conquest, a difficulty into a diamond, a failure into some fertilizer, a problem into a positive, a trial into a triumph." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.52613] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"There are always ways to 'spin' the facts to support the conclusion that a person desires to communicate. For example during 2013 and 2014 the politicians wanted to suggest the world economy was improving! So when oil price increased in 2013 they said this was due to the world economy improving and so demand for petrol was increasing. In 2014 when oil prices decreased they said this was positive for the world economy as it would mean that less money would be spent on petrol and so more money would be available for people to spend on their other desires. It is not difficult to imagine 'spin' that would have shown that both these prices in oil would have been bad for the world economy. This is why being skeptical is important so that information used to help people choose is as truthful and unbiased as possible." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
[Refer http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2014-12-05/only-thing-more-bullish-economy-lower-oil-prices http://www.wsj.com/articles/lower-oil-prices-will-help-boost-global-economy-imfs-lagarde-says-1417479908 http://www.usatoday.com/story/money/markets/2013/12/31/oil-gas-prices-2013/4270465/ ]
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[Quote No.52625] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem:]

'Wisdom'

When I have ceased to break my wings
Against the faultiness of things,
And learned that compromises wait
Behind each hardly opened gate,
When I can look Life in the eyes,
Grown calm and very coldly wise,
Life will have given me the Truth,
And taken in exchange -- my youth.

" - Sara Teasdale
'Love Songs'
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[Quote No.52629] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Occasionally we all feel like...] My soul is a broken field, plowed by pain. [These feelings are all part of developing empathy and compassion for others and ourselves and testing ideas to learn what works to give us greater choice and control over our lives and happiness in a process of self-evolution and 'the getting of wisdom' for the good of all!]" - Sara Teasdale

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[Quote No.52632] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about learning from every experience, especially mistakes and difficulties, so when life gives you lemons you create lemonade.]

For I shall learn from flower and leaf,
That color every drop they hold,
To change the lifeless wine of grief
To living gold.

" - Sara Teasdale
Poet
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[Quote No.52647] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem:]

The timid and fearful first failures dismay,
but the stout heart stays trying by night and by day.
He values his failures as lessons that teach,
The one way to get to the goal he would reach.

" - Edgar Albert Guest
(1881–1959), prolific English-born American poet who was popular in the first half of the 20th century and became known as the People's Poet.
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[Quote No.52650] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about learning from mistakes and turning lemons into lemonade]

'Hard Knocks'

I'm not the man to say that failure's sweet,
Nor tell a chap to laugh when things go wrong;
I know it hurts to have to take defeat
An' no one likes to loose before a throng;
It isn't very pleasant not to win
When you have done the very best you could;
But if you're down, get up and buckle in -
A lickin' often does a fellow good.

I've seen some chaps who never knew their power
Until somebody knocked 'em to the floor;
I've known men who discovered in an hour
A courage they had never shown before.
I've seen 'em rise from failure to the top
By doin' things they hadn't understood
Before the day disaster made 'em drop -
A lickin' often does a fellow good.

Success is not the teacher, wise an' true,
That gruff old failure is, remember that;
She's much too apt to make a fool of you,
Which isn’t true of blows that knock you flat.
Hard knocks are painful things an' hard to bear,
An' most of us would dodge 'em if we could;
There’s something mighty broadening in care -
A lickin’ often does a fellow good.

" - Edgar Albert Guest
(1881 - 1959) American author and poet
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[Quote No.52661] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about being skeptical of anything unproven - especially pessimistic criticism - and being willing to put it to the test.]

'It Couldn’t Be Done'

Somebody said that it couldn’t be done,
But he with a chuckle replied
That 'maybe it couldn’t,' but he would be one
Who wouldn’t say so ‘till he’d tried.
So he buckled right in with a trace of a grin
On his face. If he worried he hid it.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done and he did it.

Somebody Scoffed: 'Oh, you’ll never do that;
At least no one ever has done it;'
But he took off his coat and he took off his hat,
And the first thing we knew he’d begun it.
With a lift of his chin and a bit of a grin,
Without any doubting or quiddit.
He started to sing as he tackled the thing
That couldn’t be done, and he did it.

There are thousands to tell you it cannot be done,
There are thousands to prophesy failure;
There are thousands to point out to you one by one
The dangers that wait to assail you.

But just buckle in with a bit of a grin,
Just take off your coat and go at it;
Just start to sing as you tackle the thing
That 'cannot be done' and you’ll do it.

" - Edgar Albert Guest
(1881 - 1959) American author and poet
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[Quote No.52672] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about provable, scientific knowledge, truth and wisdom]

'The True Bible'

What is the world's true Bible -- ‘tis the highest thought of man,
The thought distilled through ages since the dawn of thought began.
And each age adds a word thereto, some psalm or promise sweet --
And the canon is unfinished and forever incomplete.
O'er the chapters that are written, long and lovingly we pore --
But the best is yet unwritten, for we grow from more to more.

Let us heed the voice within us and its messages rehearse;
Let us build the growing Bible -- for we too must write a verse.
What is the purport of the scheme toward which all time is gone?
What is the great aeonian goal? The joy of going on.

And are there any souls so strong, such feet with swiftness shod,
That they shall reach it, reach some bourne, the ultimate of god?
There is no bourne, no ultimate. The very farthest star
But rims a sea of other stars that stretches just as far.
There's no beginning and no end: As in the ages gone,
The greatest joy of joys shall be -- the joy of going on.

" - Sam Walter Foss
(1858 - 1911), poet. [The word 'Bible', which is derived from the same root word and meaning as bibliography, means 'books; collection of books; library'. 'The True Bible' is not specifically the same as 'The Holy Bible' as the word ‘Holy,’ means ‘consecrated, sacred; morally and spiritually perfect; belonging to, commissioned by or devoted to God’ (Concise Oxford Dictionary). Refer http://www.biblebasics.co.uk/thebible/bibleind.htm ] (bourne = n. Archaic 1. A destination; a goal. 2. A boundary; a limit.)
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[Quote No.52673] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the force of irrational habit and custom and therefore the need to be skeptical about our attitudes, skills and knowledge and regularly challenge and reprove their truth and rejustify their superior usefulness to what options are available now.]

'The Calf-Path'

One day, through the primeval wood,
A calf walked home, as good calves should;
But made a trail all bent askew,
A crooked trail as all calves do.

Since then two hundred years have fled,
And, I infer, the calf is dead.
But still he left behind his trail,
And thereby hangs my moral tale.

The trail was taken up next day
By a lone dog that passed that way;
And then a wise bell-wether sheep
Pursued the trail o'er vale and steep,
And drew the flock behind him, too,
As good bell-wethers always do.

And from that day, o'er hill and glade,
Through those old woods a path was made;
And many men wound in and out,
And dodged, and turned, and bent about
And uttered words of righteous wrath
Because ‘twas such a crooked path.
But still they followed -- do not laugh --
The first migrations of that calf,
And through this winding wood-way stalked,
Because he wobbled when he walked.

This forest path became a lane,
That bent, and turned, and turned again;
This crooked lane became a road,
Where many a poor horse with his load
Toiled on beneath the burning sun,
And traveled some three miles in one.
And thus a century and a half
They trod the footsteps of that calf.
The years passed on in swiftness fleet,
The road became a village street,
And this, before men were aware,
A city's crowded thoroughfare;
And soon the central street was this
Of a renowned metropolis;
And men two centuries and a half
Trod in the footsteps of that calf.

Each day a hundred thousand rout
Followed the zigzag calf about;
And o'er his crooked journey went
The traffic of a continent.
A hundred thousand men were led
By one calf near three centuries dead.
They followed still his crooked way,
And lost one hundred years a day;
For thus such reverence is lent
To well-established precedent.

A moral lesson this might teach,
Were I ordained and called to preach;
For men are prone to go it blind
Along the calf-paths of the mind,
And work away from sun to sun
To do what other men have done.
They follow in the beaten track,
And out and in, and forth and back,
And still their devious course pursue,
To keep the path that others do.

But how the wise old wood-gods laugh,
Who saw the first primeval calf!
Ah! many things this tale might teach --
But I am not ordained to preach.

" - Sam Walter Foss
(1858 - 1911), poet.
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[Quote No.52697] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that!" - John Stuart Mill

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[Quote No.52711] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the value of both good and bad]

'The Guest House'

This being human is a guest house.
Every morning a new arrival.

A joy, a depression, a meanness,
some momentary awareness comes
As an unexpected visitor.

Welcome and entertain them all!
Even if they're a crowd of sorrows,
who violently sweep your house
empty of its furniture,
still treat each guest honorably.
He may be clearing you out
for some new delight.

The dark thought, the shame, the malice,
meet them at the door laughing,
and invite them in.

Be grateful for whoever comes,
because each has been sent
as a guide from beyond.

" - Rumi
(1207 – 1273), Mewlana Jalaluddin Rumi - Persian poet, Islamic dervish, Sufi mystic and jurist. Translated by Coleman Barks
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[Quote No.52720] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[There is value to the negatives in life:] Emergencies [adversity, problems, difficulties, challenges, mistakes, etc] have always been necessary to [spur learning, imagination and] progress! It was darkness which produced the lamp. It was fog that produced the compass. It was hunger that drove us to exploration." - Victor Hugo

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[Quote No.52748] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Some] Poetry is nearer to vital truth than history." - Plato

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[Quote No.52752] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Laws as devised by rulers, governments and politicians are best when they express the unalienable rights, concerns and needs of the people and therefore, it has been argued, that the spokespeople of the community, the] Poets are the unacknowledged legislators of the world." - Percy Bysshe Shelley
(1792 – 1822) one of the major English Romantic poets, and regarded by critics as amongst the finest lyric poets in the English language. This quote is the concluding line of the essay, 'A Defence of Poetry' he wrote in 1821, but was only first published posthumously in 1840. [Refer http://www.bartleby.com/27/23.html and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Defence_of_Poetry ]
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[Quote No.52758] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about how adversity, challenges, problems, pain, mistakes, etc give us the opportunity to grow in sympathy and in skills and become better.]

'Along The Road'

I walked a mile with Pleasure;
She chattered all the way,
But left me none the wiser
For all she had to say.

I walked a mile with Sorrow
And ne'er a word said she;
But oh, the things I learned from her
When Sorrow walked with me!

" - Robert Browning Hamilton

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[Quote No.52769] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem:- about the importance of being skeptical about everything - negativity, pessimism and criticism just as much as positivity, optimism and praise.]

'It Can Be Done'

The man who misses all the fun
Is he who says, 'It can't be done.'
In solemn pride he stands aloof
And greets each venture with reproof.
Had he the power he'd efface
The history of the human race;
We'd have no radio or motor cars,
No streets lit by electric stars;
No telegraph nor telephone,
We'd linger in the age of stone.
The world would sleep if things were run
By men who say 'It can't be done.'

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.52774] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Life-skilled:] Whom do I call educated?

First, those who manage well the circumstances which they encounter day by day and those who possess a judgment which is accurate in meeting occasions as they arise and rarely miss the expedient course of action.

Next, those who are decent and honorable in their intercourse with all men, bearing easily and good-naturedly what is unpleasant and offensive in others, and being as agreeable and reasonable to their associates as it is humanly possible to be.

Furthermore, those who hold their pleasures always under control and are not ultimately overcome by their misfortunes, bearing up under them bravely and in a manner worthy of our common nature.

Finally, and most important of all, those who are not spoiled by their successes, who do not desert their true selves, but hold their ground steadfastly as wise and sober-minded men, rejoicing no more in the good things that have come to them through chance than in the which, through their own nature and intelligence, are theirs since birth.

Those who have a character which is in accord, not with one of these things, but with all of them -- these I maintain are educated and whole men [and women] possessed of all the virtues of a man [or woman].

" - Socrates

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[Quote No.52805] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Many men know the laws of mathematics and are skilled in the arts, but most men know very little about the laws governing life, the art of living. One may be able to build an airplane and circle the globe and yet be entirely ignorant of the simple art of how to be happy, successful, and content. When studying the arts, place first upon the list the art of living ['life-skills']. " - Unknown

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[Quote No.52814] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem:]

'Mistakes'

...

Through strife the slumbering soul awakes
We learn on errors troubled route
The truths we could not prize without
The sorrow of our sad mistakes.

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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[Quote No.52831] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[By thinking, learning and doing we are creating ourselves:] Our deeds are recorded even to the smallest detail. The recording 'angel' is no myth; it is found in ourselves. It is the law of habit. We spend our lives writing our own biographies. Every act, word, and thought leaves an impression and a tendency that makes repetition easy. We are prone to imitate those about us but most of all we imitate ourselves. The doing of a thing once makes it easier to do it again in the same way; and the repetition becomes a habit, which is almost impossible to break. Habits determine character, therefore right character consists of right habit making." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52832] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about memories, habits and character]

'A Builder's Lesson'

'How shall I a habit break?'
As you did that habit make.
As you gathered, you must lose;
As you yielded, now refuse.
Thread by thread the strands we twist
Till they bind us neck and wrist;
Thread by thread the patient hand
Must untwine ere free we stand.
As we builded, stone by stone,
We must toil unhelped, alone,
Till the wall is overthrown.

But remember, as we try,
Lighter every test goes by;
Wading in, the stream grows deep
Toward the center's downward sweep;
Backward turn, each step ashore
Shallower is than that before.

Ah, the precious years we waste
Leveling what we raised in haste;
Doing what must be undone
Ere content or love be won!
First across the gulf we cast
Kite-borne threads, till lines are passed,
And habit builds the bridge at last!

" - John Boyle O'Reilly
(1844 – 1890) Irish-born poet, journalist and fiction writer.
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[Quote No.52838] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about facing the adversities as necessary and even beneficial as they teach how to be and travel better in the future]

'Rabbi Ben Ezra'

...

Then, welcome each rebuff
That turns earth's smoothness rough,
Each sting that bids nor sit nor stand but go!
Be our joys three-parts pain!
Strive, and hold cheap the strain;
Learn, nor account the pang; dare, never grudge the throe!

...

" - Robert Browning
(1812–1889), English poet.
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[Quote No.52857] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Prefer knowledge to wealth; for the one is transitory, the other perpetual." - Socrates

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[Quote No.52863] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"When we long for life without difficulties [adversities, challenges, problems, mistakes, pain, etc], remind us that oaks grow strong in contrary winds and diamonds are made under pressure [and that these difficulties show us where we can improve and give us opportunities to better understand, experiment with and perfect methods to overcome these weaknesses in ourselves for the betterment of all in the future]." - Peter Marshall

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[Quote No.52917] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the importance of 'negative-bad' as well as 'positive-good' experiences for there are advantages in adversities, blessings in burdens, lessons in laments, positives in problems, etc!]

'Blessed Are They'

...

Yea, truly, though joy's note be sweet,
Life does not thrill to joy alone.
The harp is incomplete
That has no deeper tone.

Unclouded sunshine overmuch
Falls vainly on the barren plain;
But fruitful is the touch
Of sunshine after rain!

Who only scans the heavens by day
Their story but half reads, and mars;
Let him learn how to say,
'The night is full of stars!'

...

" - Rossiter Worthington Raymond
(1840 – 1918) American mining engineer, legal scholar and author. At his memorial, the President of Lehigh University described him as 'one of the most remarkable cases of versatility that our country has ever seen - sailor, soldier, engineer, lawyer, orator, editor, novelist, story-teller, poet, biblical critic, theologian, teacher, chess-player - he was superior in each capacity. What he did, he always did well.'
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[Quote No.53053] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the value of 'negative-bad' as well as 'positive-good' experiences for there are advantages in adversities, blessings in burdens, lessons in laments, positives in problems, etc. For example; we learn patience; we learn to be grateful for the good things without taking them for granted and; we also learn to relate and be compassionate to those who are suffering.]

'The Joy of Incompleteness'

If all our life were one broad glare
Of sunlight clear, unclouded:
If all our path were smooth and fair,
By no soft gloom enshrouded;
If all life's flowers were fully blown
Without the sweet unfolding,
And happiness were rudely thrown
On hands too weak for holding --
Should we not miss the twilight hours,
The gentle haze and sadness?
Should we not long for storms and showers
To break the constant gladness?

If none were sick and none were sad,
What service could we render?
I think if we were always glad
We scarcely could be tender.
Did our beloved never need
Our patient ministration,
Earth would grow cold and miss indeed
Its sweetest consolation:
If sorrow never claimed our heart
And every wish were granted
Patience would die, and hope depart --
Life would be disenchanted.

" - Albert Crowell

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[Quote No.53078] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about learning from mistakes and valuing them for their guidance and eventual self-improvement]

'Life'

All in the dark we grope along,
And if we go amiss
We learn at least which path is wrong,
And there is gain in this.

...

Some souls there are that needs must taste
Of wrong, ere choosing right;
We should not call those years a waste
Which led us to the light.

" - Ella Wheeler Wilcox

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[Quote No.53115] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about blessings from burdens, namely the benefits of wisdom and personal growth from learning what really works or doesn't in the real laboratory of life, as persistently try ways to endure and overcome the obstacles to our dream, goal, desire, etc]

'Good Timber'

The tree that never had to fight
For sun and sky and air and light,
That stood out in the open plain
And always got it's share of rain,
Never became a forest king,
But lived and died a scrubby thing.

The man who never had to toil
To heaven from the common soil,
Who never had to win his share
Of sun and sky and light and air,
Never became a manly man,
But lived and died as he began.

Good timber does not grow in ease;
The stronger wind, the tougher trees;
The farther sky, the greater length;
The more the storm, the more the strength;

By sun and cold, by rain and snows,
In tree or man, good timber grows.
Where thickest stands the forest growth
We find the patriarchs of both;
And they hold converse with the stars
Whose broken branches show the scars
Of many winds and much of strife --
This is the common law of life.

" - Douglas Malloch
(1877 – 1938) American poet, short-story writer and Associate Editor of American Lumberman, a trade paper in Chicago.
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[Quote No.53184] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the power of example and demonstration]

'Show Me'

I would rather see a Mason, than hear one any day,
I would rather one would walk with me than merely show the way.
The eye's a better pupil and more willing than the ear,
Fine counsel is confusing, but example's always clear.
And the best of all the Masons are the men who live their creeds,
For to see the good in action is what everybody needs.

I can soon learn how to do it if you'll let me see it done,
I can watch your hands in action, but your tongue too fast may run.
And the lectures you deliver may be wise and true,
But I'd rather get my lesson by observing what you do.
For I may misunderstand you and the high advice you give,
But there's no misunderstanding how you act and how you live.

" - Edgar Albert Guest

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[Quote No.53204] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"No matter how busy you may think you are, you must find time for reading, or surrender yourself to self-chosen ignorance. " - Confucius

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[Quote No.53207] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"True wit is Nature to advantage dressed, What oft was thought, but ne’er so well expressed!" - Alexander Pope

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[Quote No.53259] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about turning negatives into positives by learning what can from mistakes and reinvesting that learning persistently - therefore becoming wiser and more skilled and even grateful for the mistakes as you anticipate your on-going personal growth and even greater future successes and the satisfactions that those will bring!]

'The Mistake'

Why gaze so long at that mistake?
Last night it kept you wide awake,
and still you fret for its dull sake.

Don't mope about it, foolish one.
Still may you walk beneath the sun,
the race of life may yet be won.

A mere mistake and that is all.
A stumble and a moment's fall.
Don't let this little ailment gall.

Far better cry, 'Mistake! come here.'
Into its face then bravely peer,
but do not waste one sigh or tear.

A lesson, nothing more or less,
to help you win your happiness.
Then why such sharp and deep distress?

'Tis past, 'tis over, deem it dead;
accept the lesson, look ahead.
No wan regrets, fresh hope instead.

A mere mistake, be not downcast,
Wisdom you've gained; then hold it fast.
Look straight ahead, forget the past.

" - Wilhelmina Stitch
(1888-1936) Wilhelmina Stich is the pseudonym of Ruth Jacobs Cohen Collie. She was a writer, lecturer and poet - called 'The Poem A Day Lady'. Born at Cambridgeshire, England in 1888, daughter of I. W. Jacobs, she married E. Arakie Cohen while he was visiting England and returned with him to Winnipeg, the capital and largest city of the province of Manitoba, Canada. They had one son, Ralph. After her husband’s death in 1919, she was forced to seek employment to support herself and her son. Her friends encouraged her to submit her writing for publication, which led to a successful career as a writer which continued to the time of her death. Writing under the pen names 'Sheila Rand' or 'Wilhelmina Stitch', she had poetry and stories published in the Winnipeg Tribune and the Winnipeg Telegram. In time, she became, in the words an obituary, 'one of the best-known women writers in the British Empire'. She later remarried to Scottish physician Frank K. Collie and moved with him to London, England where she died on 6 March 1936. [refer http://www.mhs.mb.ca/docs/people/collie_rjc.shtml and http://content.lib.sfu.ca/cdm/ref/collection/ceww/id/254 ]
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[Quote No.53304] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[The following insight about the values of negatives in our lives has huge ramifications in all need-areas of life, but especially - learning(!), persisting, evolving, gratitude, satisfaction, anticipation:] A problem, believe it or not, is always great news at least in that it motivates you to face and solve that problem – in the same way that as expressed in the saying, ‘Need is the mother of invention (as in creativity in scientific and cultural evolution)’. In facing that problem you develop empathy and compassion for other sufferers of that problem and sufferers of problems in general. That improves your human understanding and that in turn improves your imaginative empathy with others and from that you improve your ability to apply love’s ‘Golden Rule’ of treating others in the way you imagine you would want to be treated in that same situation. Also in facing and trying to solve that problem you will need to examine it carefully and try many possible solutions. Whether they work or not you will learn and grow in experience and wisdom. That then becomes another huge benefit of the problem." - Ben O'Grady
Founder and CEO of imagi-natives.com
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[Quote No.53341] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem:]

‘The Poets light but Lamps'

The Poets light but Lamps —
Themselves — go out —
The Wicks they stimulate
If vital Light

Inhere as do the Suns —
Each Age a Lens
Disseminating their
Circumference —

" - Emily Dickinson
(1830 - 1886) American poet.
[Inhere = exist in essentially or permanently]

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[Quote No.53392] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the value of Truth and Science: the scientific method]

'Hymn to Science'

Science! thou fair effusive ray
From the great source of mental day,
Free, generous, and refin'd!
Descend with all thy treasures fraught,
Illumine each bewilder'd thought,
And bless my lab'ring mind.

But first with thy resistless light,
Disperse those phantoms from my sight,
Those mimic shades of thee;
The scholiast's learning, sophist's cant,
The visionary bigot's rant,
The monk's philosophy.

O! let thy powerful charms impart
The patient head, the candid heart,
Devoted to thy sway;
Which no weak passions e'er mislead,
Which still with dauntless steps proceed
Where Reason points the way.

Give me to learn each secret cause;
Let number's, figure's, motion's laws
Reveal'd before me stand;
These to great Nature's scenes apply,
And round the globe, and thro' the sky,
Disclose her working hand.

Next, to thy nobler search resign'd,
The busy, restless, human mind
Thro' ev'ry maze pursue;
Detect Perception where it lies,
Catch the ideas as they rise,
And all their changes view.

Say from what simple springs began
The vast, ambitious thoughts of man,
Which range beyond control;
Which seek Eternity to trace,
Dive thro' th' infinity of space,
And strain to grasp the whole.

Her secret stores let Memory tell,
Bid Fancy quit her fairy cell,
In all her colours drest;
While prompt her sallies to control,
Reason, the judge, recalls the soul
To Truth's severest test.

Then launch thro' Being's wide extent;
Let the fair scale, with just ascent,
And cautious steps, be trod;
And from the dead, corporeal mass,
Thro' each progressive order pass
To Instinct, Reason, God.

There, Science! veil thy daring eye;
Nor dive too deep, nor soar too high,
In that divine abyss;
To Faith content thy beams to lend,
Her hopes t' assure, her steps befriend,
And light her way to bliss.

Then downwards take thy flight agen;
Mix with the policies of men,
And social nature's ties:
The plan, the genius of each state,
Its interest and its pow'rs relate,
Its fortunes and its rise.

Thro' private life pursue thy course,
Trace every action to its source,
And means and motives weigh:
Put tempers, passions in the scale,
Mark what degrees in each prevail,
And fix the doubtful sway.

That last, best effort of thy skill,
To form the life, and rule the will,
Propitious pow'r! impart:
Teach me to cool my passion's fires,
Make me the judge of my desires,
The master of my heart.

Raise me above the vulgar's breath,
Pursuit of fortune, fear of death,
And all in life that's mean.
Still true to reason be my plan,
Still let my action speak the man,
Thro' every various scene.

Hail! queen of manners, light of truth;
Hail! charm of age, and guide of youth;
Sweet refuge of distress:
In business, thou! exact, polite;
Thou giv'st Retirement its delight,
Prosperity its grace.

Of wealth, pow'r, freedom, thou! the cause;
Foundress of order, cities, laws,
Of arts inventress, thou!
Without thee what were human kind?
How vast their wants, their thoughts how blind!
Their joys how mean! how few!

Sun of the soul! thy beams unveil!
Let others spread the daring sail,
On Fortune's faithless sea;
While undeluded, happier I
From the vain tumult timely fly,
And sit in peace with thee.

" - Mark Akenside
(1721-1770), English poet and physician.
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[Quote No.53402] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[There are lessons in all things, especially bad things. Finding, learning, sharing and using the lesson is how we can turn that negative into a positive -that burden into a blessing - and make the future better for all of us.] Sweet are the uses of adversity, Which like the toad, ugly and venomous, Wears yet a precious jewel in his head; And this our life, exempt from public haunt, Find tongues in trees, books in the running brooks, And good in everything." - William Shakespeare
from 'As You Like It'
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[Quote No.53410] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about asking for advice and accepting constructive criticism]

Ask council always of the wise,
give ear unto the end,
And ne’er refuse the sweet rebuke
of him that is thy friend.

" - Robert Smith
John Foxe’s Book of Martyrs.
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[Quote No.53416] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[The importance of skepticism and doubt till proven true] ...and don’t believe anything I say, unless on reflection you judge it to be true. " - Xenophon
(circa 430 BC – 354 BC), son of Gryllus, of the deme Erchia of Athens, also known as Xenophon of Athens, was a Greek historian, soldier, mercenary, and student of Socrates. While not referred to as a philosopher by his contemporaries, his status as such is now a topic of debate. Quote from his book, 'Hellenica' - Jason’s advice to Polydamas of Pharsalus.
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[Quote No.53426] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"By associating with wise people you become wise yourself." - Menander
(342 BC - 291 BC) Greek dramatist and the best-known representative of Athenian New Comedy. He was the author of more than a hundred comedies, and took the prize at the Lenaia festival eight times. Born:
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[Quote No.53474] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about learning life-skills:]

...
Ere I am old, O! let me give,
My life to learning how to live
...

" - Caroline Atherton Briggs Mason
(1823 – 1890) American poet. Quote from her poem, 'When I Am Old'. [ere = before]
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[Quote No.53517] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Poem: about the need for skepticism, careful investigation, questioning and evidence before making decisions and judgements lest silly or tragic mistakes are made]

'Beth Gelert, or the Grave of the Greyhound'

The spearmen heard the bugle sound,
And cheerly smiled the morn;
And many a brach and many a hound
Obeyed Llewelyn’s horn.

And still he blew a louder blast,
And gave a lustier cheer:
‘Come, Gelert, come, wert never last
Llewelyn’s horn to hear.

‘O, where doth faithful Gelert roam,
The flower of all his race,
So true, so brave, - a lamb at home,
A lion in the chase?’

’T was only at Llewelyn’s board
The faithful Gelert fed;
He watched, he served, he cheered his lord,
And sentineled his bed.

In sooth he was a peerless hound,
The gift of royal John;
But now no Gelert could be found,
And all the chase rode on.

And now, as o’er the rocks and dells
The gallant chidings rise,
All Snowdon’s craggy chaos yells
The many-mingled cries!

That day Llewelyn little loved
The chase of hart and hare;
And scant and small the booty proved,
For Gelert was not there.

Unpleased Llewelyn homeward hied,
When, near the portal seat,
His truant Gelert he espied,
Bounding his lord to greet.

But, when he gained his castle door,
Aghast the chieftain stood;
The hound all o’er was smeared with gore,
His lips, his fangs, ran blood.

Llewelyn gazed with fierce surprise;
Unused such looks to meet,
His favorite checked his joyful guise,
And crouched and licked his feet.

Onward, in haste, Llewelyn passed,
And on went Gelert too;
And still, where’er his eyes he cast,
Fresh blood-gouts shocked his view.

O’erturned his infant’s bed he found,
With blood-stained covert rent;
And all around the walls and ground
With recent blood besprent.

He called his child, - no voice replied, -
He searched with terror wild;
Blood, blood, he found on every side,
But nowhere found his child.

‘Hell-hound! my child’s by thee devoured,’
The frantic father cried;
And to the hilt his vengeful sword
He plunged in Gelert’s side.

His suppliant looks, as prone he fell,
No pity could impart;
But still his Gelert’s dying yell
Passed heavy o’er his heart.

Aroused by Gelert’s dying yell,
Some slumberer wakened nigh:
What words the parent’s joy could tell
To hear his infant’s cry!

Concealed beneath a tumbled heap
His hurried search had missed,
All glowing from his rosy sleep,
The cherub boy he kissed.

Nor scath had he, nor harm, nor dread,
But, the same couch beneath,
Lay a gaunt wolf, all torn and dead,
Tremendous still in death.

Ah, what was then Llewelyn’s pain!
For now the truth was clear;
His gallant hound the wolf had slain
To save Llewelyn’s heir:

Vain, vain was all Llewelyn’s woe;
’Best of thy kind, adieu!
The frantic blow which laid thee low
This heart shall ever rue.’

And now a gallant tomb they raise,
With costly sculpture decked;
And marbles storied with his praise
Poor Gelert’s bones protect.

There never could the spearman pass,
Or forester, unmoved;
There oft the tear-besprinkled grass
Llewelyn’s sorrow proved.

And there he hung his horn and spear,
And there, as evening fell,
In fancy’s ear he oft would hear
Poor Gelert’s dying yell.

And, till great Snowdon’s rocks grow old,
And cease the storm to brave,
The consecrated spot shall hold
The name of ‘Gelert’s Grave.’

" - William Robert Spencer
(1770–1834), English poet. This poem is like the short story, 'Death of a Hero', written by Marvin O. Ashton in 'Aspiring to Greatness'.
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[Quote No.53569] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"[Learning: a positive in a negative...] Sometimes by losing a battle you find a new way to win the war." - Donald Trump
American businessman
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[Quote No.53573] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Rehearse Coping Strategies: Here is a powerful tool that will help you cope with even the most difficult situations: Mentally picture yourself coming across difficult life tests - and then see yourself coping well with them. Repeat this over and over again in your mind... Today, think of a specific life test that you can apply this to." - Rabbi Zelig Pliskin
(see Rabbi Eliyahu Eliezer Dessler - Michtav MaiEliyahu, vol.4, pp252-3)
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