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  Quotations - Persist  
[Quote No.51809] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"We do not meet with success except by reiterated efforts." - Françoise de Maintenon
Françoise d'Aubigné, Marquise de Maintenon was the second wife of King Louis XIV of France. She was known during her first marriage as Madame Scarron, and subsequently as Madame de Maintenon.
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[Quote No.51811] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"The successful man lengthens his stride when he discovers that the signpost has deceived him; the failure looks for a place to sit down!" - J. R. Rogers

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[Quote No.51812] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"A determinate purpose in life and a steady adhesion to it through all disadvantages are indispensable conditions of success." - William Punshon

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[Quote No.51817] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"About the only thing that comes to us without effort is old age [and then death]." - Gloria Pitzer

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[Quote No.51826] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Diligence is the mother of good fortune." - Benjamin Disraeli

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[Quote No.51831] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Great effort springs naturally from great attitude." - Pat Riley

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[Quote No.51845] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"When you have exhausted all possibilities, remember this: you haven't!" - Thomas A. Edison

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[Quote No.51847] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Become a possibilitarian. No matter how dark things seem to be or actually are, raise your sights and see the [good] possibilities - always see them, for they are always there!" - Norman Vincent Peale

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[Quote No.51849] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Do not let your fire go out, spark by irreplaceable spark in the hopeless swamps of the not quite, the not yet, and the not at all. Do not let the hero in your soul perish in lonely frustration for the life you deserved and have never been able to reach. The world you desire can be won. It exists. It is real. It is possible. It is yours." - Ayn Rand

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[Quote No.51902] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposed ideas in the mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. One should, for example, be able to see that things are hopeless and yet be determined to make them otherwise. " - F. Scott Fitzgerald

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[Quote No.51949] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about handling difficult situations by remembering that it could be worse and that I help myself be more able to cope by focusing on seeing myself getting through it.] - Adrift - In 1982 Steven Callahan was crossing the Atlantic alone in his sailboat when it struck something and sank. He was out of the shipping lanes and floating in a life raft, alone. His supplies were few. His chances were small. Yet when three fishermen found him seventy-six days later (the longest anyone has survived a shipwreck on a life raft alone), he was alive -- much skinnier than he was when he started, but alive. His account of how he survived is fascinating. His ingenuity -- how he managed to catch fish, how he fixed his solar still (evaporates sea water to make fresh) -- is very interesting. But the thing that caught my eye was how he managed to keep himself going when all hope seemed lost, when there seemed no point in continuing the struggle, when he was suffering greatly, when his life raft was punctured and after more than a week struggling with his weak body to fix it, it was still leaking air and wearing him out to keep pumping it up. He was starved. He was desperately dehydrated. He was thoroughly exhausted. Giving up would have seemed the only sane option. When people survive these kinds of circumstances, they do something with their minds that gives them the courage to keep going. Many people in similarly desperate circumstances give in or go mad. Something the survivors do with their thoughts helps them find the guts to carry on in spite of overwhelming odds. 'I tell myself I can handle it,' wrote Callahan in his narrative. 'Compared to what others have been through, I'm fortunate. I tell myself these things over and over, building up fortitude....' I wrote that down after I read it. It struck me as something important. And I've told myself the same thing when my own goals seemed far off or when my problems seemed too overwhelming. And every time I've said it, I have always come back to my senses. The truth is, our circumstances are only bad compared to something better. But others have been through much worse. I've read enough history to know you and I are lucky to be where we are, when we are, no matter how bad it seems to us compared to our fantasies. It's a sane thought and worth thinking. So here, coming to us from the extreme edge of survival, are words that can give us strength. Whatever you're going through, tell yourself you can handle it. Compared to what others have been through, you're fortunate. Tell this to yourself over and over, and it will help you get through the rough spots with a little more fortitude." - Adam Khan
'Self-Help Stuff That Works'
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[Quote No.51957] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about courage and the rewards of persistence:] - My Miraculous Family - I never considered myself unique, but people are constantly telling me, 'I am a miracle.' To me, I was just an ordinary 'guy' with realistic goals and big dreams. I was a 19-year-old student at the University of Texas and well on my way toward fulfilling my 'big dream' of one day becoming an orthopedic surgeon. On the night of February 17, 1981 I was studying for an Organic Chemistry test at the library with Sharon, my girlfriend of three years. Sharon had asked me to drive her back to her dormitory as it was getting quite late. We got into my car, not realizing that just getting into a car would never quite be the same for me again. I quickly noticed that my gas gauge was registered on empty so I pulled into a nearby convenience store to buy $2.00 worth of gas. 'I'll be back in two minutes,' I yelled at Sharon as I closed the door. But instead, those two minutes changed my life forever. Entering the convenience store was like entering the twilight zone. On the outside I was a healthy, athletic, pre-med student, but on the inside I was just another statistic of a violent crime. I thought I was entering an empty store, but suddenly I realized it was not empty at all. Three robbers were in the process of committing a robbery and my entrance into the store caught them by surprise. One of the criminals immediately shoved a .38 caliber handgun to my head, ordered me to the cooler, pushed me down on the floor, and pumped a bullet into the back of my head - execution style. He obviously thought I was dead because he did not shoot me again. The trio of thieves finished robbing the store and left calmly. Meanwhile, Sharon wondered why I had not returned. After seeing the three men leave the store she really began to worry as I was the last person she saw entering the store. She quickly went inside to look for me, but saw no one -- only an almost empty cash register containing one check and several pennies. Quickly she ran down each aisle shouting, 'Mike, Mike!' Just then the attendant appeared from the back of the store shouting, 'Lady, get down on the floor. I've just been robbed and shot at!' Sharon quickly dropped to the floor screaming, 'Have you seen my boyfriend ... auburn hair?' The man did not reply but went back to the cooler where he found me choking on my vomit. The attendant quickly cleaned my mouth and then called for the police and an ambulance. Sharon was in shock. She was beginning to understand that I was hurt, but she could not begin to comprehend or imagine the severity of my injury. When the police arrived they immediately called the homicide division as they did not think I would survive and the paramedic reported that she had never seen a person so severely wounded survive. At 1:30 a.m. my parents who lived in Houston, were awakened by a telephone call from Brackenridge Hospital advising them to come to Austin as soon as possible for they feared I would not make it through the night. But I did make it through the night and early in the morning the neurosurgeon decided to operate. However, he quickly informed my family and Sharon that my chances of surviving the surgery were only 40/60. If this were not bad enough, the neurosurgeon further shocked my family by telling them what life would be like for me if I beat the odds and survived. He said I probably would never walk, talk, or be able to understand even simple commands. My family was hoping and praying to hear even the slightest bit of encouragement from that doctor. Instead, his pessimistic words gave my family no reason to believe that I would ever again be a productive member of society. But once again I beat the odds and survived the three and a half hours of surgery. Even though my family breathed a huge sigh of relief that I was still alive the doctor cautioned that it would still be several days before I would be out of danger. However, with each passing day I became stronger and stronger and two weeks later I was well enough to be moved from the ICU to a private room. Granted, I still could not talk, my entire right side was paralyzed and many people thought I could not understand, but at least I was stable. After one week in a private room the doctors felt I had improved enough to be transferred by jet ambulance to Del Oro Rehabilitation Hospital in Houston. My hallucinations, coupled with my physical problems, made my prognosis still very bleak. However, as time passed my mind began to clear and approximately six weeks later my right leg began to move ever so slightly. Within seven weeks my right arm slowly began to move and at eight weeks I uttered my first few words. My speech was extremely difficult and slow in the beginning, but at least it was a beginning. I was starting to look forward to each new day to see how far I would progress. But just as I thought my life was finally looking brighter I was tested by the hospital neuropsychologist. She explained to me that judging from my test results she believed that I should not focus on returning to college but that it would be better to set more 'realistic goals.' Upon hearing her evaluation I became furious for I thought, 'Who is she to tell me what I can or cannot do. She does not even know me. I am a very determined and stubborn person!' I believe it was at that very moment that I decided I would somehow, someday return to college. It took me a long time and a lot of hard work but I finally returned to the University of Texas in the fall of 1983 - a year and a half after almost dying. The next few years in Austin were very difficult for me, but I truly believe that in order to see beauty in life you have to experience some unpleasantness. Maybe I have experienced too much unpleasantness, but I believe in living each day to the fullest, and doing the very best I can. And each new day was very busy and very full, for besides attending classes at the University I underwent therapy three to five days each week at Brackenridge Hospital. If this were not enough I flew to Houston every other weekend to work with Tom Williams, a trainer and executive who had worked for many colleges and professional teams and also had helped many injured athletes, such as Earl Campbell and Eric Dickerson. Through Tom I learned: 'Nothing is impossible and never, never give up or quit.' He echoed the same words and sentiments of a prominent neurosurgeon from Houston, Dr. Alexander Gol, who was a close personal friend of my parents and who drove to Austin with my family in the middle of the night that traumatic February morning. Over the many months I received many opinions from different therapists and doctors but it was Dr. Gol who told my family to take one day at a time, for no matter how bad the situation looked, no one knew for certain what the brain could do. Early, during my therapy, my father kept repeating to me one of his favorite sayings. It could have been written by both Tom and Dr. Gol and I have repeated it almost every day since being hurt: 'Mile by mile it's a trial; yard by yard it's hard; but inch by inch it's a cinch.' I thought of those words, and I thought of Dr. Gol, Tom, my family and Sharon who believed so strongly in me as I climbed the steps to receive my diploma from the Dean of Liberal Arts at the University of Texas on that bright sunny afternoon in June of 1986. Excitement and pride filled my heart as I heard the dean announce that I had graduated with 'highest honors' (grade point average of 3.885), been elected to Phi Beta Kappa, and been chosen as one of 12 Dean's Distinguished Graduates out of 1600 in the College of Liberal Arts. The overwhelming emotions and feelings that I experienced at that very moment, when most of the audience gave me a standing ovation, I felt would never again be matched in my life -- not even when I graduated with a masters degree in social work and not even when I became employed full time at the Texas Pain and Stress Center. But I was wrong! On May 24, 1987, I realized that nothing could ever match the joy I felt as Sharon and I were married. Sharon, my high school sweetheart of nine years, had always stood by me, through good and bad times. To me, Sharon is my miracle, my diamond in a world filled with problems, hurt, and pain. It was Sharon who dropped out of school when I was hurt so that she could constantly be at my side. She never wavered or gave up on me. It was her faith and love that pulled me through so many dark days. While other nineteen year old girls were going to parties and enjoying life, Sharon devoted her life to my recovery. That, to me, is the true definition of love. After our beautiful wedding I continued working part time at the Pain Center and completed my work for a masters degree while Sharon worked as a speech pathologist at a local hospital. We were extremely happy, but even happier when we learned Sharon was pregnant. On July 11, 1990 at 12:15 a.m. Sharon woke me with the news: 'We need to go to the hospital .... my water just broke.' I couldn't help but think how ironic it was that my life almost ended in a convenience store and now on the date '7-11' we were about to bring a new life into this world. This time it was my turn to help Sharon as she had helped me over those past years. Sharon was having contractions about every two minutes, and each time she needed to have her lower back massaged. Since she was in labor for 15 hours that meant 450 massages!! It was well worth every bit of pain in my fingers because at 3:10 p.m. Sharon and I experienced the birth of our beautiful daughter, Shawn Elyse Segal! Tears of joy and happiness came to my eyes as our healthy, alert, wonderful daughter entered this world. We anxiously counted her 10 fingers and her 10 toes and watched her wide eyes take in the world about her. It was truly a beautiful picture that was etched in my mind forever as she lay in her mother's waiting arms, just minutes after her birth. At that moment I thanked God for blessing us with the greatest miracle of all -- Shawn Elyse Segal." - Michael Jordan Segal
'Teaching What I Most Need to Know'
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[Quote No.51960] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Mile by mile it's a trial; yard by yard it's hard; but inch by inch it's a cinch!" - Saying

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[Quote No.51961] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about helping others and not being daunted by a big job.] - The Secret of Jimmy Yen - A jury of distinguished scholars and scientists, including Albert Einstein and Orville Wright thought enough of Jimmy Yen to vote him one of the top ten Modern Revolutionaries of the Twentieth Century. Yet all he did was teach Chinese peasants to read. What made that so amazing was that for four thousand years reading and writing in China was only done by the Scholars. 'Everybody' knew, including the peasants themselves, that peasants were incapable of learning. That thoroughly ingrained cultural belief was Jimmy Yen's first 'impossible' barrier. The second barrier was the Chinese language itself, consisting of 40,000 characters, each character signifying a different word! The third barrier was the lack of technology and good roads. How could Jimmy Yen reach the 350 million peasants in China? Impossible odds, an impossibly huge goal-and yet he had almost attained it when he was forced (by Communism) to leave his country. Did he give up? No. He learned from defeat and expanded his goal: Teach the rest of the Third World to read. Practical reading programs, like the ones he invented in China, started pumping out literate people like a gushing oil well in the Philippines, Thailand, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Kenya, Columbia, Guatemala, Indonesia, Bangladesh, Ghana, India-people became literate. For the first time in their entire genetic history, they had access to the accumulated knowledge of the human race. For those of us who take literacy for granted, I'd like you to consider for a moment how narrow your world would be if you'd never learned how to read and there was no access to radios or TVs. 180,000 Chinese peasants were hired by the Allied Forces in WW1 as laborers in the war effort. Most of them had no idea-not a clue-where England, Germany or France was, they didn't know what they were being hired to do, and didn't even know what a war was! Try to grasp, if you will, the vacancy, the darkness, the lack that existed in those people because they couldn't read. Jimmy Yen was a savior to them. What was the secret of Jimmy Yen's success? He found a real need, and found in himself a strong desire to answer that need. And he took some action: He tried to do something about it even though it seemed impossible. He worked long hours. And he started with what he had in front of him and gradually took on more and more, a little upon a little. The English author Thomas Carlyle said, 'Our main business is not to see what lies dimly at a distance, but to do what lies clearly at hand.' And that's what Jimmy Yen did. He started out teaching a few peasants to read, with no desks, no pens, no money, no overhead projectors. He started from where he found himself and did what was clearly at hand. And that's all you need to do. Start now. Start here. And do what lies clearly at hand." - Adam Khan
'Self-Help Stuff That Works'
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[Quote No.51972] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about not dwelling on past mistakes but rather spending your time focusing on what you learnt and how that has made you better and more able to make the most of all the opportunities coming to you in the future:] -- Arthur Gordon is a favorite writer of mine. Once he came to New York to interview Dr. Blanton, a co-founder of the American Foundation for Religion and Psychiatry. Mr. Gordon sat in a restaurant waiting for the esteemed psychiatrist to arrive. As he waited, his mind went back over his life. By the time Mr. Blanton arrived, Mr. Gordon was sitting there with a frown and a very sad look on his face. 'What's the matter, Arthur?' 'Oh,' the writer replied, 'I've just been sitting here thinking about all the 'if's in my life.' Dr. Blanton suggested, 'Let's drive over to my office after lunch; I want you to hear something.' Later in his office, Dr. Blanton put on a tape and said, 'I'm going to let you listen to three different people; they're all patients of mine and they are mentally ill. Listen carefully.' For one hour the great author listened. When the tape was finished , Dr. Blanton asked, 'Tell me what single trait all these people had in common.' Arthur Gordon thought a moment and then answered, 'I can't think of anything.' 'Then I'll tell you,' the psychiatrist said. 'All of them kept repeating the phrase, 'If only...if only...if only.' These words cause mental sickness. They are like poison. These people must learn to say, 'Next time...next time...next time.' These words point to the future, to a new day, to healing and health!' [Arthur Gordon, later in a book called 'A Touch of Wonder' he wrote, 'The trouble with 'if only' is that it doesn't change anything. It keeps the person facing the wrong way – backward instead of forward. It wastes time. ...You're thinking of failure as the enemy of success. But it isn't at all. Failure is a teacher – a harsh one, perhaps, but the best. You say you have a desk full of rejected manuscripts? That's great! Every one of those manuscripts was rejected for a reason. Have you pulled them to pieces looking for that reason? You've got to put failure to work for you. That's where you'll find success. On the far side of failure.']" - Unknown

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[Quote No.51983] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about seeking and accepting constructive criticism, learning from it and persisting with the things that are important to you.] - Unpolished Diamond - How a person reacts to criticism often means the difference between success and failure. Take the case of Ole Bull, the famous Norwegian violinist of the past century. His practical father, a chemist, sent him to the University of Christiania to study for the ministry and forbade him to play his beloved violin. He promptly flunked out and, defying his father, devoted all his time and energy to the violin. Unfortunately, though he had great ability, his teachers were relatively unskilled, so that by the time he was ready to start his concert tour he wasn't prepared. In Italy a Milan newspaper critic wrote: 'He is an untrained musician. If he be a diamond, he is certainly in the rough and unpolished.' There were two ways Ole Bull could have reacted to that criticism. He could have let it make him angry, or he could learn from it. Fortunately he chose the latter. He went to the newspaper office and asked to see the critic. The astounded editor introduced him. Ole spent the evening with the 70-year-old critic, asked about his faults, and sought the older man's advice on how to correct them. Then he canceled the rest of his tour, returned home, and spent the next six months studying under really able teachers. He practiced hours upon hours to overcome his faults. Finally, he returned to his concerts and, when only 26, became the sensation of Europe!" - Unknown
Ole Bornemann Bull (5 February 1810 – 17 August 1880) was a Norwegian violinist and composer.
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[Quote No.52030] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"People want rainbows but don't want the rain that produces them. People want roses but don't want the thorns that accompany them. People want to go to 'heaven' but aren't prepared to 'die' to get there." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.52033] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about valuing comfort above all else destroys a person's ability to achieve anything else, because there is always a price in comfort that must be persistently paid throughout the process to achieve anything.] - Courage or Comfort - Once there was a beautiful bird, more beautiful than any other. It was powerful and free, and possessed great courage. This bird was fearless, going wherever it wanted. It also was very proud of its spectacular plumage of vibrant colors. One day the bird decided to pluck its own feathers, one by one, to make a beautiful nest in which it could rest with comfort and security. Now the bird can no longer fly." - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'More Sower's Seeds', where this story is found.
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[Quote No.52040] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about not focusing on past hurts which demotivate you. Rather focus on the lessons hard won from the hurts and reinvest them in the future with persistence to bring you ever closer to reaching your goals and dreams and evolving into the best you, you can be.] - Leaving the City of Regret - I had not really planned on taking a trip this time of year, and yet I found myself packing rather hurriedly. This trip was going to be unpleasant and I knew in advance that no real good would come of it. I'm talking about my annual 'Guilt Trip.' I got tickets to fly there on Wish I Had airlines. It was an extremely short flight. I got my baggage, which I could not check. I chose to carry it myself all the way. It was weighted down with a thousand memories of what might have been. No one greeted me as I entered the terminal to the Regret City International Airport. I say international because people from all over the world come to this dismal town. As I checked into the Last Resort Hotel, I noticed that they would be hosting the year's most important event, the Annual Pity Party. I wasn't going to miss that great social occasion. Many of the towns leading citizens would be there. First, there would be the Done family, you know, Should Have, Would Have and Could Have. Then came the I Had family. You probably know ol' Wish and his clan. Of course, the Opportunities would be present, Missed and Lost. The biggest family would be the Yesterday's. There are far too many of them to count, but each one would have a very sad story to share. Then Shattered Dreams would surely make an appearance. And It's Their Fault would regale us with stories (excuses) about how things had failed in his life, and each story would be loudly applauded by Don't Blame Me and I Couldn't Help It. Well, to make a long story short, I went to this depressing party knowing that there would be no real benefit in doing so. And, as usual, I became very depressed. But as I thought about all of the stories of failures brought back from the past, it occurred to me that all of this trip and subsequent 'pity party' could be cancelled by ME! I started to truly realize that I did not have to be there. I didn't have to be depressed. One thing kept going through my mind, I CAN'T CHANGE YESTERDAY, BUT I DO HAVE THE POWER TO MAKE TODAY A WONDERFUL DAY. I can be happy, joyous, fulfilled, encouraged, as well as encouraging. Knowing this, I left the City of Regret immediately and left no forwarding address. Am I sorry for mistakes I've made in the past? YES! But there is no physical way to undo them. So, if you're planning a trip back to the City of Regret, please cancel all your reservations now. Instead, take a trip to a place called, Starting Again. I liked it so much that I have now taken up permanent residence there. My neighbors, the I Forgive Myselfs and the New Starts are so very helpful. By the way, you don't have to carry around heavy baggage, because the load is lifted from your shoulders upon arrival. Congratulations in finding this great town. If you can find it -- it's in your own heart -- please look me up. I live on I Can Do It street." - Larry Harp

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[Quote No.52059] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Song Lyrics: 'Jet Airliner']

You know you got to go through hell,
Before you get to heaven.

" - The Steve Miller Band
Lyric from their song, 'Jet Airliner'.
(The 'author' ascribed to this 'quote' is the artist that released this version of the song. It is not necessarily the only artist to release the song nor is it necessarily the only version of the song available. The artist is not necessarily the song's writer, as in the person or persons who wrote the lyrics and music. The above lyrics are obviously the property and copyright of their legal owners. They are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.)
[Refer http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/stevemillerband/jetairliner.html ]

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[Quote No.52147] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about perseverance and dogged determination regardless of disabilities, real pain and reasonable excuses.] - A Different Kind of Athlete - We found out that Jenny was hearing impaired, when she was four and a half years old. Several surgeries and speech classes later, when she was seven, we found out that Jenny had Juvenile Rheumatoid Arthritis. She could not put pressure on the heels of her feet, so she walked on tiptoe, and when the pain became unbearable, I carried her. Jenny was fortunate, though, because she did not suffer the deformities, often associated with JRA. All through grade school, and on into high school, Jenny suffered, yet never complained. She took her medicine, and I would often wrap her feet in steaming towels, and hold her until the pain eased. But, as soon as she could withstand the pain, Jenny, immediately, carried on, as though she were pain free. She wore a smile on her face, a song on her lips, and a love and acceptance of others, that was, simply, amazing. I don't remember her ever voicing self-pity. She ran, when she could run. She played when she could play, and she danced when she could dance. And, when she could do none of these things, she took her medicine, and she waited until she could. Jenny, a beautiful blonde, with warm brown eyes, was never a cheerleader. She never competed in a sport. She could not even take part in a Gym Class, though she took the same health class four years in a row, just so she could pass with a substitute credit each year. She joined the band. She won a place in the Governor's School for the Arts; yet, no one in the Charleston, South Carolina School System knew what to do with Jenny. The perimeters were, simply, not in place to deal with a student, who was both active and handicapped. Jenny continued to have one surgery after another on her ears, all through school. Her hearing improved to 60%, and she taught herself to read lips. She carried a pillow to school, all through high school, and once, when she suddenly experienced crippling pain, her friends scooped her up, and carried her from class to class. She was totally mainstreamed, popular, and funny, attending every football game, cheering the team on, carrying her pillow everywhere she went, so that she could cushion the pain, when she sat down. Then came her senior year. She would be considered for scholarships; however school activities, especially sports, could often mean the difference between receiving an award or losing out. So Jenny came to a decision; and in her quirky, unorthodox manner, she began to bombard the high school football coach. She begged. She pleaded. She promised. She got her best friend to sign up with her. Finally the coach gave in, with the admonition, ‘If you miss ONE game, you're out!’ So, Jenny became Manager of the Garrett High School Football Team. She carried big buckets of water to her teammates. She bandaged knees and ankles before every game. She massaged necks and backs. She gave pep talks. She was continually at their beck and call, and it turned out to be one of the best years for Garrett High School Football Team, in its twenty-five year history. Often Jenny could be seen carrying a bucket of water in each hand, nearly dragging them, along with her pillow tucked under her arm. When asked why he thought that the team was winning all their games, even in the face of injury, one linebacker explained, in his soft, Charleston drawl, ‘Well, when you've been knocked down, and you can't seem to move, you look up and see Jenny Lewis, limping across the field, dragging her buckets and carrying her pillow. It makes anything the rest of us may suffer seem pretty insignificant.’ At the Senior Awards ceremony, Jenny received a number of scholarships to College of Charleston. Her favorite scholarship, however, was a small one from the Charleston Women's Club. The President of the Women's Club listed Jenny's accomplishments, starting with her grades, and ending with an excited, ‘...and the first girl to letter in football, in Garrett High School history!!’" - Jaye Lewis

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[Quote No.52158] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about the importance of recreation and taking time to relax.] - Balance - Once the great Anthony of the Desert was relaxing with his disciples outside his hut when a hunter came by. The hunter was surprised to see Anthony relaxing, and rebuffed him for taking it easy. It was not his idea of what a holy monk should be doing. Anthony replied, 'Bend your bow and shoot an arrow.' And the hunter did so. 'Bend it again and shoot another arrow,' said Anthony. The hunter did so, again and again. The hunter finally said, 'Abba Anthony, if I keep my bow always stretched, it will break.' 'So it is with the monk,' replied Anthony. 'If we push ourselves beyond measure, we will break. It is right from time to time to relax our efforts!' " - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004).
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[Quote No.52167] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Only one thing has to change for us to know happiness [action, persistence and success] in our lives: where we focus our attention!" - Greg Anderson
US basketball player, NBA forward/center for San Antonio Spurs and Atlanta Hawks
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[Quote No.52175] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about the value of challenges to help us grow in knowledge and in realising our potential.] - Refining Gold - Near Cripple Creek, Colorado, gold and tellurium occur mixed as tellurite ore. The refining methods of the early mining camps could not separate the two elements, so the ore was thrown into a scrap heap. One day a miner mistook a lump of ore for coal and tossed it into his stove. Later, while removing ashes from the stove, he found the bottom littered with beads of pure gold. The heat had burned away the tellurium, leaving the gold in a purified state. The discarded ore was reworked and yielded a fortune. People are like tellurite ore. We have gold inside us, but it often takes some trial in the fiery furnace of life to transform us." - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004).
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[Quote No.52180] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Song Lyrics: The Rose]

Just remember in the winter far beneath the bitter snow,
Lies the seed that with the sun's love, in the spring becomes the rose!

" - Bette Midler
Also known by her informal stage name 'The Divine Miss M', she is an American singer-songwriter, actress, comedian, film producer and entrepreneur.
(The 'author' ascribed to this 'quote' is the artist that released this version of the song. It is not necessarily the only artist to release the song nor is it necessarily the only version of the song available. The artist is not necessarily the song's writer, as in the person or persons who wrote the lyrics and music. The above lyrics are obviously the property and copyright of their legal owners. They are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.)
[Refer http://www.songlyrics.com/bette-midler/the-rose-lyrics/ ]

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[Quote No.52183] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about failures usually out-numbering successes and that this shouldn't discourage you if you understand that it is not unique to you, but just the way some things are in life.] - The Law of the Seed - Take a look at an apple tree. There might be five hundred apples on the tree, but each apple has just ten seeds. That's a lot of seeds! We might ask, ‘Why would you need so many seeds to grow just a few more apple trees?’ Nature has something to teach us here. It's telling us: ‘Not all seeds grow. In life, most seeds never grow. So if you really want to make something happen, you had better try more than once.’ This might mean: You'll attend twenty interviews to get one job. You'll interview forty people to find one good employee. You'll talk to fifty people to sell one house, one car, one vacuum cleaner, one insurance policy, or a business idea. And you might meet a hundred acquaintances just to find one special friend. When we understand the ‘Law of the Seed’, we don't get so disappointed. We stop feeling like victims. We learn how to deal with things that happen to us. Laws of nature are not things to take personally. We just need to understand them - and work with them. IN A NUTSHELL: Because failure happens, successful people ensure they have more successes by planting more seeds or in other words, having more tries and trying for longer." - Uknown

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[Quote No.52185] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Winners focus on the gain - and so continue. Losers focus on the pain - and so give up." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com

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[Quote No.52208] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about vision, persistence and patience.] - The Acorn Planter - In the 1930s a young traveler was exploring the French Alps. He came upon a vast stretch of barren land. It was desolate. It was forbidding. It was ugly. It was the kind of place you hurry away from. Then, suddenly, the young traveler stopped dead in his tracks. In the middle of this vast wasteland was a bent-over old man. On his back was a sack of acorns. In his hand was a four-foot length of iron pipe. The man was using the iron pope to punch holes in the ground. Then from the sack he would take an acorn and put it in the hole. Later the old man the traveler, 'I've planted over 100,000 acorns. Perhaps only a tenth of them will grow.' The old man's wife and son had died, and this was how he chose to spend his final years. 'I want to do something useful,' he said. Twenty-five years later the now-not-as-young traveler returned to the same desolate area. What he saw amazed him. He could not believe his own eyes. The land was covered with a beautiful forest two miles wide and five miles long. Birds were singing, animals were playing, and wild flowers perfumed the air. The traveler stood there recalling the desolation that once was. A beautiful oak forest stood there now - all because someone cared. " - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004)
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[Quote No.52239] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about the importance of desire to persistence and success.] - The Mountain - There were two warring tribes in the Andes, one that lived in the lowlands and the other high in the mountains. The mountain people invaded the lowlanders one day, and as part of their plundering of the people, they kidnapped a baby of one of the lowlander families and took the infant with them back up into the mountains. The lowlanders didn't know how to climb the mountain. They didn't know any of the trails that the mountain people used, and they didn't know where to find the mountain people or how to track them in the steep terrain. Even so, they sent out their best party of fighting men to climb the mountain and bring the baby home. The men tried first one method of climbing and then another. They tried one trail and then another. After several days of effort, however, they had climbed only several hundred feet. Feeling hopeless and helpless, the lowlander men decided that the cause was lost, and they prepared to return to their village below. As they were packing their gear for the descent, they saw the baby's mother walking toward them. They realized that she was coming down the mountain that they hadn't figured out how to climb. And then they saw that she had the baby strapped to her back. How could that be? One man greeted her and said, 'We couldn't climb this mountain. How did you do this when we, the strongest and most able men in the village, couldn't do it?' She shrugged her shoulders and said, 'It wasn't your baby.' " - Jim Stovall
from his book, 'You Don't Have to Be Blind to See'. Jim Stovall is blind and is an advocate on behalf of people with blindness. He has been a national champion Olympic weightlifter, the President of the Emmy Award-winning Narrative Television Network, and a highly sought after author and platform speaker. He is the author of the best selling book, 'The Ultimate Gift', which is now a major motion picture starring James Garner and Abigail Breslin. Steve Forbes, president and CEO of Forbes magazine, says, 'Jim Stovall is one of the most extraordinary men of our era.' For his work in making television accessible to our nation’s 13 million blind and visually impaired people, The President’s Committee on Equal Opportunity selected Jim Stovall as the Entrepreneur of the Year. He was also chosen as the International Humanitarian of the Year, joining Jimmy Carter, Nancy Reagan, and Mother Teresa as recipients of this honor. Printer Friendly Version Comment on Article
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[Quote No.52261] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about the power of dreaming and persistence.] - The Wright Stuff - Back in the 19th century two brothers had an idea which eventually became their passionate and consuming dream. Their relentless pursuit of that dream was rewarded with an accomplishment that changed world travel. On Friday December 17, 1903 at 10:35 AM, the Wright brothers (Wilbur and Orville) achieved their dream. They flew ‘the world's first power-driven, heavier-than-air machine in which man made free, controlled, and sustained flight.’ This memorable feat took place at Kitty Hawk, North Carolina on a cold windy morning. The dream started with an idea that was planted in their minds by a toy given to them by their father. In the words of the boys, ‘Late in the autumn of 1878, our father came into the house one evening with some object partly concealed in his hands, and before we could see what it was, he tossed it into the air. Instead of falling to the floor, as we expected, it flew across the room till it struck the ceiling, where it fluttered awhile, and finally sank to the floor.’ This simple toy made of bamboo, cork and stretched rubber bands, fascinated the Wright brothers and sparked their lifelong interest in human flight. The Wright brothers were great thinkers. They enjoyed learning new things. Initially, they recycled broken parts, built a printing press and opened their own printing office. Their interest moved to bicycles and in 1893, they opened the Wright Cycle Company where they sold and repaired bicycles. But Wilbur (the older brother) had his mind set on something more exciting. He decided to seriously pursue flying. The brothers spent many hours researching, testing their machines and making improvements after unsuccessful attempts at human flight. What started out as a hobby soon became a passion. With determination and patience they realized their dream in 1903. The next time you hear or see an airplane or travel on one, remember where it all started. A simply idea conceived in the minds of two young men who did not finish high school, but who would not give up on their dream of powered flight." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52264] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about the power of persistently focusing your imagination, thoughts, energy and action.] - Focus Your Thinking - On a clear, bright sunny day take powerful magnifying glass and a stack of newspapers and go outside for an experiment. Hold the magnifying glass over a pile of crumpled pages. Even though you are magnifying the power of the sun's rays through the glass lens, you will never start a fire - if you keep moving the glass. But if you hold the magnifying glass still, allowing it to focus the rays in a concentrated beam of sun energy, you harness the power of the sun and multiply it through the lens - starting a fire. Focusing also works with your power of thought! Try it and ignite your wandering ideas." - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'More Sower's Seeds', where this story is found.
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[Quote No.52285] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"People often say that motivation doesn't last. Well, neither does bathing -- that's why we recommend it daily!" - Zig Ziglar
American author and motivational speaker
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[Quote No.52298] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about the importance of persistence to overcome obstacles on the path to achieving the dream.] - The Invention of the First Successful Bread Slicing Machine in the US - For nearly 3,000 years, we’ve eaten bread. And we haven’t merely eaten it -- it’s been the crown jewel of our diet: by the early 20th century, bread made up nearly one-third of the average American's daily caloric intake. Throughout most of history, we either baked the bread ourselves, or bought it from bakers in giant, solid loaves -- until one man revolutionized the way we consumed it. On the surface, sliced bread seems pretty simple. But it didn’t come easily: it’s an invention that endured tremendous hardships, tragedy, and years of innovation before hitting the shelves in the 1920s. It even toughed out a government ban during World War II. And it began with a tenacious inventor named Otto. Born in 1880 to German immigrants, Otto Rohwedder exhibited a rare breed of entrepreneurship early on. After spending his childhood in Davenport, Iowa tinkering with small chunks of wood and rudimentary tools, he moved to Chicago at age 20 and earned a degree in optometry. A year later, he changed professions entirely and began an apprenticeship with a local jeweler. In 1905, he settled in St. Joseph, Missouri. Here, he excelled. Over the ensuing seven years, he acquired three jewelry shops and began inventing new tools and machines with his modest profits. At the time, all loaves of bread were sold whole, so as to preserve freshness. But Rohwedder began to overhear a familiar complaint among housewives: slicing bread was burdensome, time-consuming, and sometimes even perilous (hardened, stale loaves required very sharp knifes). What if, ruminated Rohwedder, there were a machine for bakers to pre-slice bread? Trusting the great potential in his hypothetical invention, he immediately set out to conduct some market research. He put together a brief questionnaire ‘for the purpose of determining a thickness of slice which would be most nearly universal in acceptance,’ and placed it as an ad in several large newspapers. Over the course of a few months, he managed to cull responses from 30,000 housewives. Armed with this knowledge, he embarked on a long, painful journey to bring his invention to life. He sold his jewelry businesses in 1916 and, with the profits, began building his first prototype in an abandoned warehouse outside of town. It was common knowledge that sliced bread didn’t maintain its soft texture as long as a whole loaf did, so the first problem Rohwedder had to address was coming up with a way to prolong freshness. His solution -- inserting long hat pins in each end of the sliced loaf to hold it together -- seemed to work initially, but bakers who tested the loaves complained that the metal pieces routinely fell out. For a year, Rohwedder retired to his warehouse and, with the feverish intensity of a mad scientist, sketched hundreds of blueprints. Then, while manufacturing his machine in 1917, he endured every inventor’s worst nightmare: a fire broke out. His prototype and all of his blueprints -- years of hard work and dedicated efforts -- were burned to ash. But Rohwedder refused to back down. He found work as an investment and securities agent to support his family, slowly rebuilt his funds, and sought out investors to back his idea. By 1927, he’d built another bread slicing machine -- one much better than his first a decade earlier. This time, instead of using pins, the machine tightly wrapped the sliced loaves in wax paper, both securing the individual pieces and keeping them fresh. A year later, he filed a patent for a ‘single step bread slicing machine,’ and formed his own company, Mac-Roh Sales & Manufacturing, to scale the production of his invention. A 1928 issue of ‘Modern Mechanics’ described the device’s ingenuity: ‘Two banks of thin sharp steel blades are utilized…The cutting edges are all in the same plane and alternated so that while one blade moves upward its immediate neighbor moves downward…As the blades pass through the soft bread, the loaf closes immediately behind the blades and keeps the air out. These perfect surfaces fit snugly against each other and adhere surprisingly, thus retaining the freshness of the loaf.’ Despite early praise, when it came time to sell the machine to bakeries, Rohwedder was scoffed at. For several months, nobody showed any interest in the device, which, at five feet wide by three feet high, was perceived to be too bulky and too complex for everyday bread production. On a last-resort whim, Rohwedder asked his friend Frank Bench, a baker on the brink of bankruptcy, if he’d give the slicer a shot. Though it was a substantial investment, Bench reluctantly agreed. ‘When no one else in the world would give my father's machine a try,’ Rohwedder’s son told the ‘Chillicothe Constitution-Tribune’ years later, ‘Frank Bench did.’ The massive machine was installed in Chillicothe, Missouri at the Chillicothe Baking Company, and, on July 7, 1928, the first loaf of commercially sliced bread was sold. The sliced loaves, produced with the name ‘Kleen Maid’, were immensely popular, and elicited glowing reviews from the press: ‘So neat and precise are the slices, and so definitely better than anyone could possibly slice by hand with a bread knife that one realizes instantly that here is a refinement that will receive a hearty and permanent welcome. After all the idea of sliced bread is not unlike the idea of ground coffee, sliced bacon and many other modern and generally accepted products which combine superior results with a saving of time and effort.’ A full-page ad in ‘Constitution-Tribune’ proudly stated that sliced bread was ‘the greatest forward step in the baking industry since bread was wrapped’ -- a phrase which was eventually hacked into the modern-day saying, ‘the greatest thing since sliced bread’ (used since the 1950s to applaud exceptional inventions). Frank Bench, the bankrupt baker who’s taken a chance on Rohwedder’s machine, was handsomely rewarded: within two weeks, his bread sales had increased by 2,000 percent. ‘We are confident in the belief that the real possibilities of Sliced Bread have scarcely been scratched,’ wrote Rohwedderin a 1930 issue of ‘New South Baker’, a bakery journal: ‘I have seen enough bakers benefit in a big way from sliced bread to know that the same results can be obtained by any baker anywhere if he goes about the matter correctly. A good loaf, a proper presentation of Sliced Bread to the grocers and a truthful, clean advertising program based upon successful experiences and the baker can build his business far beyond what he could do without sliced bread.’ A few months later, one company heeded his advice. In late 1930, the New York-based Continental Baking Company using Rohwedder’s machines to build an entire business around sliced bread. Backed by exceptional marketing, their product -- Wonder Bread -- brought the popularity of sliced bread to new peaks: by 1933, nearly every reputable bakery in the country had at least one of Rohwedder’s bread slicing machines installed in its production room, and 80% of the bread produced in America was sliced. Smitten with his success, Rohwedder sold his patent rights to industrial machinery company, Micro-Westco; he later joined on as an employee, eventually retiring in 1951 as a vice-president of sales. Throughout the 1930s, housewives revelled in the joys of not having to slice dozens of pieces of bread every day. Then, without warning, sliced bread was no more. In early 1943, citing wartime conservation efforts, U.S. Food Administrator Claude R. Wickard ordered a ‘ban’ on sliced bread. ‘The ready-sliced loaf must have a heavier wrapping than an unsliced one if it is not to dry out,’ he told the ‘New York Times’. ‘So, the order prohibiting the slicing of bread is aimed at effecting economies in the manufacture of bread and in the use of paper.’ Two weeks later, on January 18, the ban took effect, much to the dissatisfaction of homemakers. The outcry resulting from the ban was tremendous: in a ‘New York Times’ letter to the editor, one woman furiously stated her opinion on the matter: ‘I should like to let you see how important sliced bread is to the morale and saneness of a household. My husband and four children are all in a rush before, during and after breakfast. Without ready-sliced bread I must do the slicing for toast — two pieces for each one — that’s ten. For their lunches I must cut by hand at least twenty slices, for two sandwiches apiece. Afterward I make my own toast. Twenty-two slices of bread to be cut in a hurry. They look less appetizing than the baker’s neat, even pieces. Haven’t the bakers already their bread-slicing machines and for thousands of loaves? I should have to pay $7.95 for one, and I cannot afford even a good sharp knife. Sue Forrester Fairfield, Conn.’ At first, government officials warned dissenters -- especially bakers continuing to slice bread -- to back down. ‘To protect the cooperating bakeries against the unfair competition of those who continue to slice their own bread,’ New York’s FDA supervisor told the ‘Times’, ‘we are prepared to take stern measures if necessary.’ But the threats ultimately turned out to be short-lived. On March 8 -- less than three months later -- Food Administrator Wickard lifted the ban. ‘The savings are not as much as we had expected,’ he said, ‘and the War Production Board tells us that sufficient wax paper to wrap sliced bread for four months is in the hands of paper processor and the baking industry.’ Today, in an era saturated with fantastical, flashy inventions, sliced bread is often forgotten -- but its importance shouldn’t be dismissed. Though the device itself was hardly the most revolutionary thing in history, the persistence of its creator -- through loss, hardship, and doubt -- is still remembered. Deeming something to be ‘the greatest thing since sliced bread’ is a testament to its ingenuity, but also to the indefatigable spirit of invention. It’s a testament to the decades Otto Rohwedder spent toiling in his workshop, to his refusal to give up. And it is a tip of the cap to a man who believed that he could change the world -- one slice at a time." - Zachary Crockett
[http://priceonomics.com/the-invention-of-sliced-bread/?utm_source=digg&utm_medium=email ]
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[Quote No.52337] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"A true story - with a message about patient, persistent effort is the 28 year effort of lexicographer, Noah Webster, Jr. (1758 – 1843), to create his dictionary - 'An American Dictionary of the English Language'. In 1800 he published his intentions of writing a dictionary. He published a shortened, concise but comprehensive, version in 1806. The final version was finished in 1825 and published in 1828. It contained 70,000 words. To evaluate the etymology of words, Webster learned twenty-eight languages, including Old English (Anglo-Saxon), Gothic, German, Greek, Latin, Italian, Spanish, French, Dutch, Welsh, Russian, Hebrew, Aramaic, Persian, Arabic, and Sanskrit." - Seymour@imagi-natives.com
[refer http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Noah_Webster and https://www.noahwebsterhouse.org/discover/noah-webster-biography.htm ]
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[Quote No.52341] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about the importance of persistence and creativity to overcome the obstacles that everyone faces in one form or another to achieve their dreams.] - Django Reinhardt - When you hear the guitar playing of Django Reinhardt, with its fluid phrasing and lightning-fast arpeggios, it's incredible to think that he [was disabled as he] had only two good fingers on his left hand. When Reinhardt was 18 years old he was badly burned in a fire. It was late on the night of November 2, 1928. The young guitarist was at home with his common-law wife, Bella, in their gypsy caravan on the edge of Paris. To scrape together a little money, Bella had been making artificial flowers out of paper and highly flammable celluloid. When Django accidently knocked over a candle, the material from the flowers ignited and the trailer was quickly engulfed in flames. They both survived, but Django would spend the next 18 months recovering from terrible injuries. When a doctor expressed interest in amputating his right leg, Reinhardt left the hospital and moved into a nursing home, where he eventually got better. The two smallest fingers on his left hand–crucial to a guitarist for articulating notes on the fretboard–were paralyzed. A lesser musician would have given up, but Reinhardt overcame the limitation by inventing his own method of playing. With his two good fingers he moved rapidly up and down the guitar neck while making very limited use of his two shriveled fingers on chords, double-stops and triple-stops. He rose above his handicap to create one of the most distinctive instrumental styles in 20th century music. [Reinhardt's amazing technique, can be seen in the 1938 short film, Jazz 'Hot.' It features Reinhardt with violinist Stéphane Grappelli and their band, Quintette du Hot Club de France, playing a swing version of the popular song 'J'attendrai.' (It means 'I will wait.')]" - Mike Springer
[refer http://www.openculture.com/2012/08/django_reinhardt_and_the_inspiring_story_behind_his_guitar_technique.html ]
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[Quote No.52354] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"He is the best sailor who can steer within fewest points of the wind, and exact a motive power out of the greatest obstacles. [Points of sail: The course of a sailing vessel in relation to the direction of the wind, divided into six points: in irons (pointed directly into the wind), 'fewest points of the wind' or 'close hauled' (sailing as close into the direction of the wind as possible), close reach (between close reach and beam reach), beam reach (perpendicular to the wind), broad reach (wind behind the vessel at an angle), and running downwind or running before the wind (the wind is behind the vessel).] " - Henry David Thoreau

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[Quote No.52358] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Song lyrics: 'Seasons Of My Heart']

Winter comes but the spring is close behind

" - Johnny Cash
(The 'author' ascribed to this 'quote' is the artist that released this version of the song. It is not necessarily the only artist to release the song nor is it necessarily the only version of the song available. The artist is not necessarily the song's writer, as in the person or persons who wrote the lyrics and music. The above lyrics are obviously the property and copyright of their legal owners. They are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.) [Refer http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/johnnycash/seasonsofmyheart.html ]
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[Quote No.52386] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Song lyrics: 'Sometimes You Gotta Cry A Little']

One day, victory; one day, defeat,
Now I can take the bitter with the sweet!

" - Bobby 'Blue' Bland
(The 'author' ascribed to this 'quote' is the artist that released this version of the song. It is not necessarily the only artist to release the song nor is it necessarily the only version of the song available. The artist is not necessarily the song's writer, as in the person or persons who wrote the lyrics and music. The above lyrics are obviously the property and copyright of their legal owners. They are provided for educational purposes and personal use only.) [Refer http://www.metrolyrics.com/sometimes-you-gotta-cry-a-little-lyrics-bobby-blue-bland.html ]
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[Quote No.52389] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about the importance of taking the time to get rest, relaxation and recreation in order to refresh, re-energise and be at one's best:] - Busy - Once upon a time a very strong woodcutter asked for a job from a timber merchant, and he got it. The pay was very good and so were the working conditions. For that reason, the woodcutter was determined to do his best. His boss gave him an axe and showed him the area where he was supposed to work. The first day, the woodcutter cut down 18 trees. ‘Congratulations,’ the boss said. ‘Go on that way!’ Very motivated by the boss’s words, the woodcutter tried harder the next day, but he only could cut down 15 trees. The third day he tried even harder, but he only could cut down 10 trees. Day after day he was bringing less and less trees. ‘I must be losing my strength’, the woodcutter thought. He went to the boss and apologized, saying that he could not understand what was going on. ‘When was the last time you sharpened your axe?’ the boss asked. ‘Sharpen? I had no time to sharpen my axe. I have been very busy trying to cut trees...’" - Stephen Covey
'7 Habits of Highly Effective People'
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[Quote No.52394] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about determination and persistence overcoming enormous difficulties.] - Become What You Want to Be - Let me tell you about a little girl who was born into a very poor family in a shack in the Backwoods of Tennessee. She was the 20th of 22 children, prematurely born and frail. Her survival was doubtful. When she was four years old she had double pneumonia and scarlet fever - a deadly combination that left her with a paralysed and useless left leg. She had to wear an iron leg brace. Yet she was fortunate in having a mother who encouraged her. Well, this mother told her little girl, who was very bright, that despite the brace and leg, she could do whatever she wanted to do with her life. She told her that all she needed to do was to have faith, persistence, courage and indomitable spirit. So at nine years of age, the little girl removed the leg brace, and she took the step the doctors told her she would never take normally. In four years, she developed a rhythmic stride, which was a medical wonder. Then this girl got the notion, the incredible notion, that she would like to be the world's greatest woman runner. Now, what could she mean - be a runner with a leg like that? At age 13, she entered a race. She came in last - way, way last. She entered every race in high school, and in every race she came in last. Everyone begged her quit! However, one day, she came in next to last. And then there came a day when she won a race. From then on, Wilma Rudolph won every race that she entered. Wilma went to Tennessee State University, where she met a coach named Ed Temple. Coach Temple saw the indomitable spirit of the girl, that she was a believer and that she had great natural talent. He trained her so well that she went to the Olympic Games. There she was pitted against the greatest woman runner of the day, a German girl named Jutta Heine. Nobody had ever beaten Jutta. But in the 100-meter dash, Wilma Rudolph won. She beat Jutta again in the 200-meters. Now Wilma had two Olympic gold medals. Finally came the 400-meter relay. It would be Wilma against Jutta once again. The first two runners on Wilma's team made perfect handoffs with the baton. But when the third runner handed the baton to Wilma, she was so excited she dropped it, and Wilma saw Jutta taking off down the track. It was impossible that anybody could catch this fleet and nimble girl. But Wilma did just that! Wilma Rudolph had earned three Olympic gold medals." - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'The Sower's Seeds: Revised and Expanded - 120 Inspiring Stories for Preaching, Teaching and Public Speaking', (2004)
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[Quote No.52397] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about not quitting.] - The Show Must Go On - Nicolo Paganini was a well-known and gifted nineteenth century violinist. His most memorable concert was in Italy with a full orchestra. He was performing before a packed house and his technique was incredible, his tone was fantastic, and his audience dearly loved him. Toward the end of his concert, Paganini was astounding his audience with an unbelievable composition when suddenly one string on his violin snapped and hung limply from his instrument. Paganini frowned briefly, shook his head, and continued to play, improvising beautifully. Then to everyone's surprise, a second string broke. And shortly thereafter, a third. Almost like a slapstick comedy, Paganini stood there with three strings dangling from his Stradivarius. But instead of leaving the stage, Paganini stood his ground and calmly completed the difficult number on the one remaining string." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52398] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Poem: about the virtue of optimism and persistence.]

- Keep Swimming -

Two frogs fell into a deep cream bowl.
One was an optimistic soul.
But the other took the gloomy view.
'We'll drown,' he lamented without much ado,
And with a last despairing cry,
He flung up his legs and said 'Goodbye.'

Quote the other frog with a steadfast grin,
'I can't get out but I won't give in,
I'll just swim around till my strength is spent,
Then I'll die the more content.'
Bravely he swam to work his scheme,
And his struggles began to churn the cream.

The more he swam, his legs a flutter,
The more the cream turned into butter.
On top of the butter at last he stopped,
And out of the bowl he gaily hopped.

What is the moral? It's easily found...
If you can't hop out, keep swimming around!

" - Unknown

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[Quote No.52400] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about the value of adversity.] - Two Acorns - If you want to understand adversity, take two identical acorns from the same oak tree and plant them in two different locations. Plant the first in the middle of a dense forest, and the other on a hill by itself. Here's what will happen. The oak standing on a hillside is exposed to every storm and gale. As a result its roots plunge deep into the earth and spread in every direction, even wrapping themselves around giant boulders. At times it may seem the tree isn't growing fast enough - but the growth is happening under ground. It's as if the roots know they must protect the tree from the threatening elements. What about the acorn planted in the forest? It becomes a weak, frail sapling ­ having to compete with giant oaks for nutrients and space. And since it is protected by its neighbors, the little oak doesn't sense the need to spread its roots for support. Don't be afraid of adversity ­ welcome it! That's your sure-fire route to ultimate success." - Neil Eskelin

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[Quote No.52401] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about putting up with a temporary inconvenience to create a permanent pleasure.] - The Beauty Remains; the Pain Passes - Although Henri Matisse was nearly 28 years younger than Auguste Renoir, the two great artists were dear friends and frequent companions. When Renoir was confined to his home during the last decade of his life, Matisse visited him daily. Renoir, almost paralyzed by arthritis, continued to paint in spite of his infirmities. One day as Matisse watched the elder painter working in his studio, fighting torturous pain with each brush stroke, he blurted out: ‘Auguste, why do you continue to paint when you are in such agony?’ Renoir answered simply: ‘The beauty remains; the pain passes.’ And so, almost to his dying day, Renoir put paint to canvas. One of his most famous paintings, 'The Bathers', was completed just two years before his passing, 14 years after he was stricken by this disabling disease." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52408] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about persistence and going that little extra.] - Dig a Little Deeper - There's a story about the California gold rush that tells of two brothers who sold all they had and went prospecting for gold. They discovered a vein of the shining ore, staked a claim, and proceeded to get down to the serious business of getting the gold ore out of the mine. All went well at first, but then a strange thing happened. The vein of gold ore disappeared! They had come to the end of the rainbow, and the pot of gold was no longer there. The brothers continued to pick away, but without success. Finally, they gave up in disgust. They sold their equipment and claim rights for a few hundred dollars, and took the train back home. Now the man who bought the claim hired an engineer to examine the rock strata of the mine. The engineer advised him to continue digging in the same spot where the former owners had left off. And three feet deeper, the new owner struck gold. A little more persistence and the two brothers would have been millionaires themselves. That's gold in you too. Do you need to dig three feet farther?" - Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR
Fr. Brian Cavanaugh, TOR (Third Order Franciscan). He has authored a number of books including the excellent 'More Sower's Seeds', where this story is found.
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[Quote No.52410] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A story - with a message about persisting past failure to success.] - Don't Be Afraid to Fail - You've failed many times, although you may not remember. You fell down the first time you tried to walk. You almost drowned the first time you tried to swim, didn't you? Did you hit the ball the first time you swung a bat? Heavy hitters, the ones who hit the most home runs, also strike out a lot. R.H. Macy failed seven times before his store in New York caught on. English novelist John Creasey got 753 rejection slips before he published 564 books. Babe Ruth struck out 1,330 times, but he also hit 714 home runs. Don't worry about failure. Worry about the lessons you miss when you don't even try." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52411] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about persisting past failure to reach success.] - Don't Give Up - Walt Disney was turned down 302 times before he got financing for his dream of creating the 'Happiest Place on Earth'. Today, due to his persistence, millions of people have shared 'the joy of Disney'. Colonel Sanders spent two years driving across the United States looking for restaurants to buy his chicken recipe. He was turned down 1,009 times! How successful is Kentucky Fried Chicken today? Having said this, keep in mind that you must constantly re-evaluate your circumstances and the approach you are using to reach your goal. There is no sense in being persistent at something that you are doing incorrectly! Sometimes you have to modify your approach along the way. Every time you do something you learn from it, and therefore find a better way to do it the next time." - Unknown

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[Quote No.52412] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about persisting past failure to success regardless of your age.] - The Grandma Who Could - At the age of eighty, a farmer's wife in Cambridge, Virginia, suffered from painful arthritis. The mother of ten children and many grandchildren -- and great-grandchildren -- loved to do needlework, but her fingers could no longer manipulate the large needle to embroider. The elderly woman looked for something else that would keep her occupied and found she could hold a small paintbrush much easier than a needle. So she tried her hand painting. She thought her farm and country scenes were good enough to show at the Cambridge Fair, but only won prizes for her jams and canned fruit. There were no blue ribbons for her art. Then one day an art collector from New York City was traveling through the village and noticed several of her paintings for sale in a local drug store. When he showed them to his friends in the art circles of Manhattan, they were more than curious. Soon, 'Grandma Moses' gained an international reputation. Her widely-collected works of art were featured on calendars, greeting cards and in exhibitions in leading galleries including the Modern Museum of Art in New York. Even more amazing, twenty-five percent of her 1,500 popular paintings were done after she was 100!" - Neil Eskelin

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[Quote No.52413] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about persistence.] - Just Keep Planting - Paul Rokich is my hero. When Paul was a boy growing up in Utah, he happened to live near an old copper smelter, and the sulphur dioxide that poured out of the refinery had made a desolate wasteland out of what used to be a beautiful forest. When a young visitor one day looked at this wasteland and saw that there was nothing living there -- no animals, no trees, no grass, no bushes, no birds...nothing but fourteen thousand acres of black and barren land that even smelled bad -- well, this kid looked at the land and said, ‘This place is crummy.’ Paul knocked him down. He felt insulted. But he looked around him and something happened inside him. He made a decision: Paul Rokich vowed that some day he would bring back the life to this land. Many years later Paul was in the area, and he went to the smelter office. He asked if they had any plans to bring the trees back. The answer was ‘No.’ He asked if they would let him try to bring the trees back. Again, the answer was ‘No.’ They didn't want him on their land. He realized he needed to be more knowledgeable before anyone would listen to him, so he went to college to study botany. At the college he met a professor who was an expert in Utah's ecology. Unfortunately, this expert told Paul that the wasteland he wanted to bring back was beyond hope. He was told that his goal was foolish because even if he planted trees, and even if they grew, the wind would only blow the seeds forty feet per year, and that's all you'd get because there weren't any birds or squirrels to spread the seeds, and the seeds from those trees would need another thirty years before they started producing seeds of their own. Therefore, it would take approximately twenty thousand years to revegetate that six-square-mile piece of earth. His teachers told him it would be a waste of his life to try to do it. It just couldn't be done. So he tried to go on with his life. He got a job operating heavy equipment, got married, and had some kids. But his dream would not die. He kept studying up on the subject, and he kept thinking about it. And then one night he got up and took some action. He did what he could with what he had. This was an important turning point. As Samuel Johnson wrote, ‘It is common to overlook what is near by keeping the eye fixed on something remote. In the same manner, present opportunities are neglected and attainable good is slighted by minds busied in extensive ranges.’ Paul stopped busying his mind in extensive ranges and looked at what opportunities for attainable good were right in front of him. Under the cover of darkness, he sneaked out into the wasteland with a backpack full of seedlings and started planting. For seven hours he planted seedlings. He did it again a week later. And every week, he made his secret journey into the wasteland and planted trees and shrubs and grass. But most of it died. For fifteen years he did this. When a whole valley of his fir seedlings burned to the ground because of a careless sheep-herder, Paul broke down and wept. Then he got up and kept planting. Freezing winds and blistering heat, landslides and floods and fires destroyed his work time and time again. But he kept planting. One night he found a highway crew had come and taken tons of dirt for a road grade, and all the plants he had painstakingly planted in that area were gone. But he just kept planting. Week after week, year after year he kept at it, against the opinion of the authorities, against the trespassing laws, against the devastation of road crews, against the wind and rain and heat...even against plain common sense. He just kept planting. Slowly, very slowly, things began to take root. Then gophers appeared. Then rabbits. Then porcupines. The old copper smelter eventually gave him permission, and later, as times were changing and there was political pressure to clean up the environment, the company actually hired Paul to do what he was already doing, and they provided him with machinery and crews to work with. Progress accelerated. Now the place is fourteen thousand acres of trees and grass and bushes, rich with elk and eagles, and Paul Rokich has received almost every environmental award Utah has. He says, ‘I thought that if I got this started, when I was dead and gone people would come and see it. I never thought I'd live to see it myself!’ It took him until his hair turned white, but he managed to keep that impossible vow he made to himself as a child. What was it you wanted to do that you thought was impossible? Paul's story sure gives a perspective on things, doesn't it? The way you get something accomplished in this world is to just keep planting. Just keep working. Just keep plugging away at it one day at a time for a long time, no matter who criticizes you, no matter how long it takes, no matter how many times you fall. Get back up again. And just keep planting. Just keep planting." - Adam Khan
'Self-Help Stuff That Works'
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[Quote No.52415] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[A true story - with a message about persistence.] - Keep On, Keeping On - Colonel Sanders went to more than 1,000 places trying to sell his chicken recipe before he found an interested buyer. The fact that we can buy Kentucky Fried Chicken today attests to his perseverance. Thomas Edison tried almost 10,000 times before he succeeded in creating the electric light. If he had given up, you would be reading this in the dark! The original business plan for what was to become Federal Express was given a failing grade on Fred Smith¹s college exam. And, in the early days, their employees would cash their pay checks at retail stores, rather than banks. This meant it would take longer for the money to clear, thereby giving Fed Ex more time to cover their payroll. Sylvester Stallone had been turned down a thousand times by agents and was down to his last $600 before he found a company that would produce Rocky. The rest is history! To truly succeed requires a total commitment to your goal. Too many people make the mistake of quitting just short of success. Keep going no matter what." - Jim Donovan

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