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22 of 22 results found for - "Ben Franklin"  
[Quote No.31555] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Genius without education is like silver in the mine." - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.28294] Need Area: Mind > Plan
"He who waits upon Fortune is never sure of a dinner." - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.36557] Need Area: Mind > Plan
"[The incredibly productive and creative Ben Franklin used a process of daily setting and reviewing goals. Each morning he asked himself when he got up - at 5 am] 'What good shall I do today?' [Then every night before bed - around 10 pm he reviewed the day and asked himself] 'What good have I done to-day?'" - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.53772] Need Area: Mind > Plan
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time! --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve! --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.53773] Need Area: Mind > Focus
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve! --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions! --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.28295] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Industry, perseverance and frugality make fortune yield. " - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.53767] Need Area: Mind > Evolve
"[Benjamin Franklin, the statesman, polymath, and United States' founding father, came up with a system for self-mastery - character development, self-growth, personal 'evolution' - that is worth taking a serious look at if you're interested in getting better at anything in life. First, for those who are unfamiliar with Franklin's accomplishments, he was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer and the glass armonica. He facilitated many civic organisations, including a fire department and a university. But the young Ben Franklin was a bit rough around the edges, prone to vehemently arguing his case in all matters and alienating colleagues. Fortunately, he realised he needed to do something about this tendency, so he decided to work on developing more amenable character traits. Despite considerable application, however, as soon as he tried, he became overwhelmed by the magnitude of the task. After much rumination, Franklin posited that it may work better to focus on improving just one thing at a time, rather than try and work on everything at once. So he selected 13 character traits that he believed were important for business and social success, and resolved to focus on just one of these for a week at a time, leaving all others to chance. He would each evening of that week review his day to see how he had handled himself in regard to the 13 virtues with special awareness of that week's focus, with a desire to see progress in the reduction of the number of transgressions, missed opportunities, etc., and therefore the improvement in his character. The following week he moved to the next characteristic and he continued thus until he had covered all of them, taking 13 weeks to complete the exercise. At this point, Franklin went back to the first week's aspect and started repeating the cycle. These four cycles fitted perfectly into the year. The virtues Franklin defined in 1741, in his own words (plus his added commentary) were:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates. [Franklin achieved extraordinary success. In his autobiography he said that he felt that his greatest contribution to posterity, and the one that he wished most fervently his progeny would heed, was his system for self-mastery.] It may be well my posterity should be informed that to this little artifice, with the blessing of God, their ancestor ow'd the constant felicity of his life, down to his 79th year, in which this is written....I hope, therefore, that some of my descendants may follow the example and reap the benefit." - Ben Franklin
The quote above is from his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'. [The introduction above is from the excellent article 'What teachers can learn from Benjamin Franklin: a step-by-step approach' by Tom Cassidy - Refer http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2014/jan/14/teachers-learn-benjamin-franklin-step-by-step-teaching-practice-improvement ]
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[Quote No.36558] Need Area: Mind > Progress
"[The incredibly productive and creative Ben Franklin used a process of daily setting and reviewing goals. Each morning he asked himself when he got up - at 5 am] 'What good shall I do today?' [Then every night before bed - around 10 pm - he reviewed the day and asked himself] 'What good have I done to-day?'" - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.53768] Need Area: Mind > Progress
"[Benjamin Franklin, the statesman, polymath, and United States' founding father, came up with a system for self-mastery - character development, self-growth, personal 'evolution' - that is worth taking a serious look at if you're interested in getting better at anything in life. First, for those who are unfamiliar with Franklin's accomplishments, he was a leading author, printer, political theorist, politician, postmaster, scientist, musician, inventor, satirist, civic activist, statesman, and diplomat. As a scientist, he was a major figure in the American enlightenment and the history of physics for his discoveries and theories regarding electricity. He invented the lightning rod, bifocals, the Franklin stove, a carriage odometer and the glass armonica. He facilitated many civic organisations, including a fire department and a university. But the young Ben Franklin was a bit rough around the edges, prone to vehemently arguing his case in all matters and alienating colleagues. Fortunately, he realised he needed to do something about this tendency, so he decided to work on developing more amenable character traits. Despite considerable application, however, as soon as he tried, he became overwhelmed by the magnitude of the task. After much rumination, Franklin posited that it may work better to focus on improving just one thing at a time, rather than try and work on everything at once. So he selected 13 character traits that he believed were important for business and social success, and resolved to focus on just one of these for a week at a time, leaving all others to chance. He would each evening of that week review his day to see how he had handled himself in regard to the 13 virtues with special awareness of that week's focus, with a desire to see progress in the reduction of the number of transgressions, missed opportunities, etc., and therefore the improvement in his character. The following week he moved to the next characteristic and he continued thus until he had covered all of them, taking 13 weeks to complete the exercise. At this point, Franklin went back to the first week's aspect and started repeating the cycle. These four cycles fitted perfectly into the year. The virtues Franklin defined in 1741, in his own words (plus his added commentary) were:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates. [Franklin achieved extraordinary success. In his autobiography he said that he felt that his greatest contribution to posterity, and the one that he wished most fervently his progeny would heed, was his system for self-mastery.] It may be well my posterity should be informed that to this little artifice, with the blessing of God, their ancestor ow'd the constant felicity of his life, down to his 79th year, in which this is written....I hope, therefore, that some of my descendants may follow the example and reap the benefit!" - Ben Franklin
The quote above is from his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'. [The introduction above is from the excellent article 'What teachers can learn from Benjamin Franklin: a step-by-step approach' by Tom Cassidy - Refer http://www.theguardian.com/teacher-network/teacher-blog/2014/jan/14/teachers-learn-benjamin-franklin-step-by-step-teaching-practice-improvement ]
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[Quote No.53777] Need Area: Body > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation! --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.28296] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Industry, perseverance and frugality make fortune yield!" - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.53774] Need Area: Money > Spend
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing! --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.53775] Need Area: Property > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time! --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation! --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.287] Need Area: Food > General
"At his table he liked to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to converse with, and always took care to start some ingenius or useful topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good, just, and prudent in the conduct of life; and little or no notice was ever taken to the victuals on the table,..." - Ben Franklin
[1706 – 1790], American scientist, inventor, statesman, printer, philosopher, musician and economist, discussing his father and childhood.
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[Quote No.53770] Need Area: Food > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation! --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.35652] Need Area: Friends > Children
"At his table he liked to have, as often as he could, some sensible friend or neighbor to converse with, and always took care to start some ingenius or useful topic for discourse, which might tend to improve the minds of his children. By this means he turned our attention to what was good, just, and prudent in the conduct of life..." - Ben Franklin
[1706 – 1790], American scientist, inventor, statesman, printer, philosopher, musician and economist, discussing his father and childhood.
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[Quote No.51996] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"[Do not gossip or share real secrets with anyone: silence alone is golden.] If you would keep your secret from an enemy, tell it not to a friend. [He also said 'Three can keep a secret, if two of them are dead.'] " - Ben Franklin
From his 'Poor Richard's Almanack'.
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[Quote No.53771] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation! --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly! --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty! --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve! --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable! --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates!" - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.686] Need Area: Friends > General
"I will speak ill of no man…and speak all the good I know of everybody" - Ben Franklin

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[Quote No.53776] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty! --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve! --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable. --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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[Quote No.309] Need Area: Fun > Gratitude
"When the well is dry, people know the worth of water. [so appreciate what you have while you have it]" - Ben Franklin
(1706 – 1790) , American scientist, inventor, statesman, printer, philosopher, musician and economist.
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[Quote No.53778] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Here are the thirteen virtues that Benjamin Franklin set for himself throughout his life, in his own words, plus his added commentary, as he defined them in 1741 and wrote them in his autobiography for the edification and emulation of his children and those who read his autobiography:] --- Temperance. Eat not to dullness; drink not to elevation. --- Silence. Speak not but what may benefit others or yourself; avoid trifling conversation. --- Order. Let all your things have their places; let each part of your business have its time. --- Resolution. Resolve to perform what you ought; perform without fail what you resolve. --- Frugality. Make no expense but to do good to others or yourself; i.e., waste nothing. --- Industry. Lose no time; be always employ'd in something useful; cut off all unnecessary actions. --- Sincerity. Use no hurtful deceit; think innocently and justly, and, if you speak, speak accordingly. --- Justice. Wrong none by doing injuries, or omitting the benefits that are your duty. --- Moderation. Avoid extreams; forbear resenting injuries so much as you think they deserve. --- Cleanliness. Tolerate no uncleanliness in body, cloaths, or habitation. --- Tranquillity. Be not disturbed at trifles, or at accidents common or unavoidable! --- Chastity. Rarely use venery but for health or offspring, never to dulness, weakness, or the injury of your own or another's peace or reputation. --- Humility. Imitate Jesus and Socrates." - Ben Franklin
From his book, 'The Autobiography of Benjamin Franklin'.
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