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43 of 43 results found for - "Robert Burns"  
[Quote No.9792] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"I pick my favorite quotations and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence. " - Robert Burns
Scottish Poet
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[Quote No.48401] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence." - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter to a friend
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[Quote No.58568] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"Know that prudent, cautious, self-control Is wisdom's root. " - Robert Burns
(1759-1796)
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[Quote No.66190] Need Area: Mind > Learn
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence. " - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter
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[Quote No.44297] Need Area: Mind > Focus
"I pick my favorite quotation and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.51307] Need Area: Mind > Focus
"Prudent, cautious self-control, is wisdom's root." - Robert Burns
(1759 - 1796)
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[Quote No.58569] Need Area: Mind > Focus
"Know that prudent, cautious, self-control Is wisdom's root!" - Robert Burns
(1759-1796)
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[Quote No.38743] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Firmness in enduring and exertion is a character I always wish to possess. I have always despised the whining yelp of complaint and cowardly resolve." - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.51656] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"[Poem: - with a lesson about failure, mistakes, costs, learning and persistence]

The best laid schemes o' mice an' men,
Gang aft agley,
And lea'e us nought by grief and pain,
For promised joy.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.60347] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"Firmness, both in sufferance and exertion, is a character which I would wish to possess. I have always despised the whining yelp of complaint and the cowardly, feeble resolve." - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.66192] Need Area: Mind > Persist
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!! " - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter
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[Quote No.52553] Need Area: Mind > Evolve
"[Poem: about the content of a person's character is more important than their appearance, wealth or social 'position'!]

'A Man's A Man For A' That'

Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave-we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that:
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's abon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that;
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's coming yet for a' that,
That Man to Man, the world o'er,
Shall brothers be for a' that.

" - Robert Burns
Birkie=cool, young guy
Coof=idiot
E'er=ever
Fa'=fall; or lot, portion; or to get; suit; claim
Gie=give
Gowd=gold
Gude=good
Hoddin=the motion of a sage countryman riding on a cart-horse
Mak=make
Maunna=mustn't
Sae=so Wha=who
Yon=yonder
[http://www.robertburns.org/works/496.shtml ]

This has been set to music, and you may have heard it sung. It is written in Ayrshire dialect, and English, but the sentiments expressed are universal.

In Verse One, Burns is saying that wealth, or lack of it, and social class should not be the measure of a man's true worth. 'The rank is but the guinea's stamp' means that a person cannot be given a price. The man's character is the true gold.

Verse Two continues the theme. We may wear ordinary clothes, and eat simple food, but appearance is just a show, like tinsel. Honesty is worth more than fancy clothes.

Now Verse Three might have got Burns into some trouble in Edinburgh. The birkie (cool young guy) who struts around, and has the title of Lord, is only a coof (an idiot). The man who learns to think for himself is worth much more than that.

Verse Four continues this theme. Princes can hand out titles at will, but honesty and pure goodness are worth much more. Self respect doesn't come from inherited wealth or titles.

Verse Five is a prayer that Sense and Worth shall eventually agree with all mankind. Burns imagines a future world in which all people will live as brothers, in mutual trust and respect. 'It's coming yet, for a' that'.
[refer http://allpoetry.com/A-Man's-A-Man-For-A'-That ]

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[Quote No.52551] Need Area: Body > Grooming
"[Poem: about the content of a person's character is more important than their appearance, wealth or social 'position'.]

'A Man's A Man For A' That'

Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave-we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that:
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's abon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that;
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's coming yet for a' that,
That Man to Man, the world o'er,
Shall brothers be for a' that.

" - Robert Burns
Birkie=cool, young guy
Coof=idiot
E'er=ever
Fa'=fall; or lot, portion; or to get; suit; claim
Gie=give
Gowd=gold
Gude=good
Hoddin=the motion of a sage countryman riding on a cart-horse
Mak=make
Maunna=mustn't
Sae=so Wha=who
Yon=yonder
[http://www.robertburns.org/works/496.shtml ]

This has been set to music, and you may have heard it sung. It is written in Ayrshire dialect, and English, but the sentiments expressed are universal.

In Verse One, Burns is saying that wealth, or lack of it, and social class should not be the measure of a man's true worth. 'The rank is but the guinea's stamp' means that a person cannot be given a price. The man's character is the true gold.

Verse Two continues the theme. We may wear ordinary clothes, and eat simple food, but appearance is just a show, like tinsel. Honesty is worth more than fancy clothes.

Now Verse Three might have got Burns into some trouble in Edinburgh. The birkie (cool young guy) who struts around, and has the title of Lord, is only a coof (an idiot). The man who learns to think for himself is worth much more than that.

Verse Four continues this theme. Princes can hand out titles at will, but honesty and pure goodness are worth much more. Self respect doesn't come from inherited wealth or titles.

Verse Five is a prayer that Sense and Worth shall eventually agree with all mankind. Burns imagines a future world in which all people will live as brothers, in mutual trust and respect. 'It's coming yet, for a' that'.
[refer http://allpoetry.com/A-Man's-A-Man-For-A'-That ]

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[Quote No.53377] Need Area: Body > General
"[Poem: about how some see life as being difficult for most, rich and poor alike, until death's release]

'Man Was Made To Mourn: A Dirge'

When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.

'Young stranger, whither wand'rest thou?'
Began the rev'rend sage;
'Does thirst of wealth thy step constrain,
Or youthful pleasure's rage?
Or haply, prest with cares and woes,
Too soon thou hast began
To wander forth, with me to mourn
The miseries of man.

'The sun that overhangs yon moors,
Out-spreading far and wide,
Where hundreds labour to support
A haughty lordling's pride;-
I've seen yon weary winter-sun
Twice forty times return;
And ev'ry time has added proofs,
That man was made to mourn.
'O man! while in thy early years,
How prodigal of time!
Mis-spending all thy precious hours -
Thy glorious, youthful prime!
Alternate follies take the sway;
Licentious passions burn;
Which tenfold force gives Nature's law.
That man was made to mourn.

'Look not alone on youthful prime,
Or manhood's active might;
Man then is useful to his kind,
Supported in his right:
But see him on the edge of life,
With cares and sorrows worn;
Then Age and Want-oh! ill-match'd pair -
Shew man was made to mourn.

'A few seem favourites of fate,
In pleasure's lap carest;
Yet, think not all the rich and great
Are likewise truly blest:
But oh! what crowds in ev'ry land,
All wretched and forlorn,
Thro' weary life this lesson learn,
That man was made to mourn.

'Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves,
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight,
So abject, mean, and vile,
Who begs a brother of the earth
To give him leave to toil;
And see his lordly fellow-worm
The poor petition spurn,
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife
And helpless offspring mourn.

'If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave,
By Nature's law design'd,
Why was an independent wish
E'er planted in my mind?
If not, why am I subject to
His cruelty, or scorn?
Or why has man the will and pow'r
To make his fellow mourn?

'Yet, let not this too much, my son,
Disturb thy youthful breast:
This partial view of human-kind
Is surely not the last!
The poor, oppressed, honest man
Had never, sure, been born,
Had there not been some recompense
To comfort those that mourn!

'O Death! the poor man's dearest friend,
The kindest and the best!
Welcome the hour my aged limbs
Are laid with thee at rest!
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow
From pomp and pleasure torn;
But, oh! a blest relief for those
That weary-laden mourn!'

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as The Bard. He was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. This poem was first published in 1784.
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[Quote No.7663] Need Area: Money > Invest
"[Poem:]

The best laid schemes o' mice an' men,
Gang aft agley,
And lea'e us nought by grief and pain,
For promised joy.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.11849] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Prudent, cautious self-control, is wisdom's root. " - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.29621] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Prudent, cautious self-control, is wisdom's root. [especially when investing]" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.51308] Need Area: Money > Invest
"Prudent, cautious self-control, is wisdom's root!" - Robert Burns
(1759 - 1796)
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[Quote No.52552] Need Area: Money > General
"[Poem:- about the content of a person's character is more important than their appearance, wealth or social 'position'.]

'A Man's A Man For A' That'

Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave-we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that:
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's abon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that;
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's coming yet for a' that,
That Man to Man, the world o'er,
Shall brothers be for a' that.

" - Robert Burns
Birkie=cool, young guy
Coof=idiot
E'er=ever
Fa'=fall; or lot, portion; or to get; suit; claim
Gie=give
Gowd=gold
Gude=good
Hoddin=the motion of a sage countryman riding on a cart-horse
Mak=make
Maunna=mustn't
Sae=so Wha=who
Yon=yonder
[http://www.robertburns.org/works/496.shtml ]

This has been set to music, and you may have heard it sung. It is written in Ayrshire dialect, and English, but the sentiments expressed are universal.

In Verse One, Burns is saying that wealth, or lack of it, and social class should not be the measure of a man's true worth. 'The rank is but the guinea's stamp' means that a person cannot be given a price. The man's character is the true gold.

Verse Two continues the theme. We may wear ordinary clothes, and eat simple food, but appearance is just a show, like tinsel. Honesty is worth more than fancy clothes.

Now Verse Three might have got Burns into some trouble in Edinburgh. The birkie (cool young guy) who struts around, and has the title of Lord, is only a coof (an idiot). The man who learns to think for himself is worth much more than that.

Verse Four continues this theme. Princes can hand out titles at will, but honesty and pure goodness are worth much more. Self respect doesn't come from inherited wealth or titles.

Verse Five is a prayer that Sense and Worth shall eventually agree with all mankind. Burns imagines a future world in which all people will live as brothers, in mutual trust and respect. 'It's coming yet, for a' that'.
[refer http://allpoetry.com/A-Man's-A-Man-For-A'-That ]

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[Quote No.51521] Need Area: Work > Leadership
"I pick my favorite quotation and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!!!" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.63877] Need Area: Work > Sell
"Dare to be honest... " - Robert Burns
(1759-1796), [also known as Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as simply The Bard] Scottish poet and lyricist
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[Quote No.53380] Need Area: Property > Clothing
"[Poem: about how if we could see how fashion makes us look ridiculous we would dress more sensibly and be more humble]

'To a Louse'

...

O wad some Power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!
It wad frae monie a blunder free us,
An'foolish notion:
What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us,
An' ev'n devotion!

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), Scottish poet.

Refer below for the modern English translation by Michael R. Burch of the above quoted, last verse of this poem:

O would some Power with vision teach us
To see ourselves as others see us!
It would from many a blunder free us,
And foolish notions:
What airs in dress and carriage would leave us,
And even devotion!


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[Quote No.11627] Need Area: Property > Garden/Nature
"[Poem:]

Again rejoicing Nature sees,
Her robe assume its vernal hues,
Her leafy locks wave in the breeze,
All freshly steep'd in the morning dews.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.35118] Need Area: Property > Garden/Nature
"When chill November's surly blast make fields and forest bare." - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.41438] Need Area: Friends > Love
"[A poem:]

'A Red, Red Rose'

O my Luve's like a red, red rose,
That's newly sprung in June;
O my Luve's like the melodie,
That's sweetly play'd in tune.

As fair art thou, my bonnie lass,
So deep in luve am I:
And I will luve thee still, my dear,
Till a' the seas gang dry:

Till a' the seas gang dry, my dear,
And the rocks melt wi' the sun:
I will luve thee still, my dear,
While the sands o' life shall run.

And fare thee well, my only Luve,
And fare thee well, a while!
And I will come again, my Luve,
Tho' it were ten thousand mile.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.52511] Need Area: Friends > Love
"[Poem: about a love ending.]

'A Fond Kiss'

...

But to see her was to love her;
Love but her, and love forever.
Had we never lov'd say kindly,
Had we never lov'd say blindly,
Never met--or never parted--
We had ne'er been broken-hearted.
Fare thee well, thou first and fairest!
Fare thee well, thou best and dearest!

...

" - Robert Burns
Say=so
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[Quote No.52512] Need Area: Friends > Love
"[Poem: 'A Fond Kiss']

But to see her was to love her;
Love but her, and love forever.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.19569] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"A mind conscious of integrity scorns to say more than it means to perform." - Robert Burns
(1759-1796), Scottish poet
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[Quote No.29501] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"Learn taciturnity [to speak little and then only briefly] and let that be your motto!" - Robert Burns
Famous Scottish poet
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[Quote No.44298] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"I pick my favorite quotation and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!!" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.48403] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!!" - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter to a friend
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[Quote No.53381] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"[Poem:- about empathy and in particular how if we could see how fashion makes us look ridiculous we would dress more sensibly and be more humble in our behaviour and speech]

'To a Louse'

...

O wad some Power the giftie gie us
To see oursels as ithers see us!
It wad frae monie a blunder free us,
An'foolish notion:
What airs in dress an' gait wad lea'e us,
An' ev'n devotion!

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), Scottish poet.

Refer below for the modern English translation by Michael R. Burch of the above quoted, last verse of this poem:

O would some Power with vision teach us
To see ourselves as others see us!
It would from many a blunder free us,
And foolish notions:
What airs in dress and carriage would leave us,
And even devotion!


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[Quote No.60348] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"Firmness, both in sufferance and exertion, is a character which I would wish to possess. I have always despised the whining yelp of complaint and the cowardly, feeble resolve!" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.63878] Need Area: Friends > Conversation
"Dare to be honest ... " - Robert Burns
(1759-1796), [also known as Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as simply The Bard] Scottish poet and lyricist
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[Quote No.15200] Need Area: Friends > General
"Man's inhumanity to man makes countless thousands mourn!" - Robert Burns
(1759-1796), famous Scottish poet.
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[Quote No.27260] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: ‘Man was Made to Mourne – A Dirge’ ]

Man’s inhumanity to man,
Makes countless thousands mourn!

" - Robert Burns
(1759 - 1796), the national poet of Scotland. Line from his poem ‘Man was Made to Mourne – A Dirge’.
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[Quote No.31675] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:]

The heart benevolent and kind,
The most resembles God.

" - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.52554] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem:- about the content of a person's character is more important than their appearance, wealth or social 'position'!]

'A Man's A Man For A' That'

Is there for honest Poverty
That hings his head, an' a' that;
The coward slave-we pass him by,
We dare be poor for a' that!
For a' that, an' a' that.
Our toils obscure an' a' that,
The rank is but the guinea's stamp,
The Man's the gowd for a' that.

What though on hamely fare we dine,
Wear hoddin grey, an' a that;
Gie fools their silks, and knaves their wine;
A Man's a Man for a' that:
For a' that, and a' that,
Their tinsel show, an' a' that;
The honest man, tho' e'er sae poor,
Is king o' men for a' that.

Ye see yon birkie, ca'd a lord,
Wha struts, an' stares, an' a' that;
Tho' hundreds worship at his word,
He's but a coof for a' that:
For a' that, an' a' that,
His ribband, star, an' a' that:
The man o' independent mind
He looks an' laughs at a' that.

A prince can mak a belted knight,
A marquis, duke, an' a' that;
But an honest man's abon his might,
Gude faith, he maunna fa' that!
For a' that, an' a' that,
Their dignities an' a' that;
The pith o' sense, an' pride o' worth,
Are higher rank than a' that.

Then let us pray that come it may,
(As come it will for a' that,)
That Sense and Worth, o'er a' the earth,
Shall bear the gree, an' a' that.
For a' that, an' a' that,
It's coming yet for a' that,
That Man to Man, the world o'er,
Shall brothers be for a' that.

" - Robert Burns
Birkie=cool, young guy
Coof=idiot
E'er=ever
Fa'=fall; or lot, portion; or to get; suit; claim
Gie=give
Gowd=gold
Gude=good
Hoddin=the motion of a sage countryman riding on a cart-horse
Mak=make
Maunna=mustn't
Sae=so Wha=who
Yon=yonder
[http://www.robertburns.org/works/496.shtml ]

This has been set to music, and you may have heard it sung. It is written in Ayrshire dialect, and English, but the sentiments expressed are universal.

In Verse One, Burns is saying that wealth, or lack of it, and social class should not be the measure of a man's true worth. 'The rank is but the guinea's stamp' means that a person cannot be given a price. The man's character is the true gold.

Verse Two continues the theme. We may wear ordinary clothes, and eat simple food, but appearance is just a show, like tinsel. Honesty is worth more than fancy clothes.

Now Verse Three might have got Burns into some trouble in Edinburgh. The birkie (cool young guy) who struts around, and has the title of Lord, is only a coof (an idiot). The man who learns to think for himself is worth much more than that.

Verse Four continues this theme. Princes can hand out titles at will, but honesty and pure goodness are worth much more. Self respect doesn't come from inherited wealth or titles.

Verse Five is a prayer that Sense and Worth shall eventually agree with all mankind. Burns imagines a future world in which all people will live as brothers, in mutual trust and respect. 'It's coming yet, for a' that'.
[refer http://allpoetry.com/A-Man's-A-Man-For-A'-That ]

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[Quote No.53378] Need Area: Friends > General
"[Poem: about how some see life as being difficult for most, rich and poor alike, until death's release.]

'Man Was Made To Mourn: A Dirge'

When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.

'Young stranger, whither wand'rest thou?'
Began the rev'rend sage;
'Does thirst of wealth thy step constrain,
Or youthful pleasure's rage?
Or haply, prest with cares and woes,
Too soon thou hast began
To wander forth, with me to mourn
The miseries of man.

'The sun that overhangs yon moors,
Out-spreading far and wide,
Where hundreds labour to support
A haughty lordling's pride;-
I've seen yon weary winter-sun
Twice forty times return;
And ev'ry time has added proofs,
That man was made to mourn.
'O man! while in thy early years,
How prodigal of time!
Mis-spending all thy precious hours -
Thy glorious, youthful prime!
Alternate follies take the sway;
Licentious passions burn;
Which tenfold force gives Nature's law.
That man was made to mourn.

'Look not alone on youthful prime,
Or manhood's active might;
Man then is useful to his kind,
Supported in his right:
But see him on the edge of life,
With cares and sorrows worn;
Then Age and Want-oh! ill-match'd pair -
Shew man was made to mourn.

'A few seem favourites of fate,
In pleasure's lap carest;
Yet, think not all the rich and great
Are likewise truly blest:
But oh! what crowds in ev'ry land,
All wretched and forlorn,
Thro' weary life this lesson learn,
That man was made to mourn.

'Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves,
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight,
So abject, mean, and vile,
Who begs a brother of the earth
To give him leave to toil;
And see his lordly fellow-worm
The poor petition spurn,
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife
And helpless offspring mourn.

'If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave,
By Nature's law design'd,
Why was an independent wish
E'er planted in my mind?
If not, why am I subject to
His cruelty, or scorn?
Or why has man the will and pow'r
To make his fellow mourn?

'Yet, let not this too much, my son,
Disturb thy youthful breast:
This partial view of human-kind
Is surely not the last!
The poor, oppressed, honest man
Had never, sure, been born,
Had there not been some recompense
To comfort those that mourn!

'O Death! the poor man's dearest friend,
The kindest and the best!
Welcome the hour my aged limbs
Are laid with thee at rest!
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow
From pomp and pleasure torn;
But, oh! a blest relief for those
That weary-laden mourn!'

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as The Bard. He was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. This poem was first published in 1784.
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[Quote No.48402] Need Area: Fun > General
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence!" - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter to a friend
Author's Info on Wikipedia  - Author on ebay  - Author on Amazon  - More Quotes by this Author
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Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.53379] Need Area: Fun > General
"[Poem: about how some see life as being difficult for most, rich and poor alike, until death's release!]

'Man Was Made To Mourn: A Dirge'

When chill November's surly blast
Made fields and forests bare,
One ev'ning, as I wander'd forth
Along the banks of Ayr,
I spied a man, whose aged step
Seem'd weary, worn with care;
His face furrow'd o'er with years,
And hoary was his hair.

'Young stranger, whither wand'rest thou?'
Began the rev'rend sage;
'Does thirst of wealth thy step constrain,
Or youthful pleasure's rage?
Or haply, prest with cares and woes,
Too soon thou hast began
To wander forth, with me to mourn
The miseries of man.

'The sun that overhangs yon moors,
Out-spreading far and wide,
Where hundreds labour to support
A haughty lordling's pride;-
I've seen yon weary winter-sun
Twice forty times return;
And ev'ry time has added proofs,
That man was made to mourn.
'O man! while in thy early years,
How prodigal of time!
Mis-spending all thy precious hours -
Thy glorious, youthful prime!
Alternate follies take the sway;
Licentious passions burn;
Which tenfold force gives Nature's law.
That man was made to mourn.

'Look not alone on youthful prime,
Or manhood's active might;
Man then is useful to his kind,
Supported in his right:
But see him on the edge of life,
With cares and sorrows worn;
Then Age and Want-oh! ill-match'd pair -
Shew man was made to mourn.

'A few seem favourites of fate,
In pleasure's lap carest;
Yet, think not all the rich and great
Are likewise truly blest:
But oh! what crowds in ev'ry land,
All wretched and forlorn,
Thro' weary life this lesson learn,
That man was made to mourn.

'Many and sharp the num'rous ills
Inwoven with our frame!
More pointed still we make ourselves,
Regret, remorse, and shame!
And man, whose heav'n-erected face
The smiles of love adorn, -
Man's inhumanity to man
Makes countless thousands mourn!

'See yonder poor, o'erlabour'd wight,
So abject, mean, and vile,
Who begs a brother of the earth
To give him leave to toil;
And see his lordly fellow-worm
The poor petition spurn,
Unmindful, tho' a weeping wife
And helpless offspring mourn.

'If I'm design'd yon lordling's slave,
By Nature's law design'd,
Why was an independent wish
E'er planted in my mind?
If not, why am I subject to
His cruelty, or scorn?
Or why has man the will and pow'r
To make his fellow mourn?

'Yet, let not this too much, my son,
Disturb thy youthful breast:
This partial view of human-kind
Is surely not the last!
The poor, oppressed, honest man
Had never, sure, been born,
Had there not been some recompense
To comfort those that mourn!

'O Death! the poor man's dearest friend,
The kindest and the best!
Welcome the hour my aged limbs
Are laid with thee at rest!
The great, the wealthy fear thy blow
From pomp and pleasure torn;
But, oh! a blest relief for those
That weary-laden mourn!'

" - Robert Burns
(1759 – 1796), also known as Robbie Burns, Rabbie Burns, Scotland's favourite son, the Ploughman Poet, Robden of Solway Firth, the Bard of Ayrshire and in Scotland as The Bard. He was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish Diaspora around the world. Celebration of his life and work became almost a national charismatic cult during the 19th and 20th centuries, and his influence has long been strong on Scottish literature. This poem was first published in 1784.
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Send as Free eCard with optional Google Image

[Quote No.60349] Need Area: Fun > General
"Firmness, both in sufferance and exertion, is a character which I would wish to possess. I have always despised the whining yelp of complaint [negativity] and the cowardly, feeble resolve." - Robert Burns

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[Quote No.66191] Need Area: Fun > General
"I pick up favorite quotations, and store them in my mind as ready armor, offensive or defensive, amid the struggle of this turbulent existence! " - Robert Burns
in a 1792 letter
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